Britbike forum

Classic British SparesKlempf British PartsBaxter CycleThe Bonneville ShopLowbrow CustomsGirling Classic MotorcycleLucas Classic MotorcycleHepolite PistonsIndustrial tec supplyJob Cycle

Upgrade your membership to Premium Membership or Gold Membership or even Benefactor


New Sponsor post
Triumph 650/750 High-Output Alternator Kit
by The Bonneville Shop - 01/13/23 11:29 pm
New FAQ post
Missing edit button
by wrench136 - 05/30/22 2:57 pm
News & Announcements
Premium members! šŸŒŸ
by Morgan aka admin - 01/28/23 3:01 pm
Buy BritBike staff a coffee ā˜•ļø or pint šŸŗ
by Morgan aka admin - 01/15/23 9:29 am
Benefactor āœ…
by Morgan aka admin - 01/08/23 8:38 pm
Gold members! ā­ļø ā­ļø ā­ļø
by Morgan aka admin - 01/03/23 6:30 pm
How to guides - Technical articles
British Fasteners Specs
by Morgan aka admin - 01/03/23 1:29 pm
ShoutChat
Comment Guidelines: Do post respectful and insightful comments. Don't flame, hate, spam.
Member Spotlight
Tridentman
Tridentman
New Jersey USA
Posts: 6,334
Joined: February 2008
Top Posters(30 Days)
Lannis 76
DavidP 64
Top Likes Received (30 Days)
Kev. 36
DavidP 25
Newest Members
sam keller, Raz, HermDawg, 47sqfour, Blackdoctor
12,383 Registered Users
Forum Statistics
Forums35
Topics76,514
Posts783,703
Members12,383
Most Online204
Jul 10th, 2022
Random Gallery photo
Photo posting tutorial

Thread Like Summary
gavin eisler, kevin, Roadwarrior
Total Likes: 3
Original Post (Thread Starter)
by Big Al
Big Al
Good evening
This is a new one to me .
A new Brit bike owner and friend did his first oil change on his new to him ā€˜79 T140E with low miles on it . (Indicated 7500)
He used Spectro mineral Heavy Duty 20w50 which is what I use in my ā€˜76 T140V .
Cleaned the frame screen and the engine screen .
On third start up with engine cold, the oil light flickers below 1500rpm.
Over 1500 the oil light goes out .
At idle, the oil light is solid on.
Before the oil change the oil light behaved normally .
Key on, light on. Engine start , light off .


Thanks in advance .
Curious in Clovis
Liked Replies
by triton thrasher
triton thrasher
Originally Posted by Stein Roger
Brass and bronze are often confused with each other, and are more often than not referred to as "copper alloys" these days. However, as brass is typically more malleable than bronze, it's often used for instruments and vases and such, while bronze is used when resistance to wear and corrosion is needed. I'm pretty sure that Triumph oil pumps are made from bronze. Personally, I've never seen an iron oil pump in a Triumph engine,, and I have actually seen a few.

SR
Originally Posted by Shippy
Brass (soft) has very poor wearing properties and would not be any good for a pump. They appear to be made of Gun Metal (Red Brass in USA), which is a type of bronze; an alloy of copper, tin and zinc. Its typically around 88% copper, 8ā€“10% tin, and 2ā€“4% zinc. It cast very well and was originally used chiefly for making cannons. It was also widely used for valves and fittings on steam locomotives and steam boilers and is much harder, stronger, wear and corrosion resistant than brass.
I see it regularly working on steam locomotive valves and fittings regularly at a heritage railway, It is a different colour (more gold coloured than yellow) like brass and I am quite familiar working with it..

You guys know your stuff, unlike those silly nits at Triumph.

[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]
1 member likes this
by triton thrasher
triton thrasher
Iā€™d check the oil pump, clean it, reseat the balls.

There may be dirt under a ball valve.

And inspect the crank nose oil seal.
1 member likes this
by Shippy
Shippy
Brass (soft) has very poor wearing properties and would not be any good for a pump. They appear to be made of Gun Metal (Red Brass in USA), which is a type of bronze; an alloy of copper, tin and zinc. Its typically around 88% copper, 8ā€“10% tin, and 2ā€“4% zinc. It cast very well and was originally used chiefly for making cannons. It was also widely used for valves and fittings on steam locomotives and steam boilers and is much harder, stronger, wear and corrosion resistant than brass.
I see it regularly working on steam locomotive valves and fittings regularly at a heritage railway, It is a different colour (more gold coloured than yellow) like brass and I am quite familiar working with it.
A number of steam loco valves have steel (stainless) non return ball valves and the practice of seating the ball in the seats by a sharp tap with a drift is a normal practice and works well to seat restore a slightly worn seat.

The secret is to give the ball only ONE sharp tap, if its going to work, that is enough.

I haven't actually done this on a Triumph pump, but I see no reason why it should be any different.
1 member likes this
British Cycle SupplyMorries PlaceKlempf British PartsBSA Unit SinglesPodtronicVintage MagazineBritBike SponsorBritish Tools & FastenersBritBike Sponsor






Ā© 1996-2023 britbike.com
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5