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Thread Like Summary
Allan G, Bustednukel, gavin eisler, The Bonneville Shop
Total Likes: 8
Original Post (Thread Starter)
by Bustednukel
Bustednukel
BSA newbie here. REALLY happy to have found the Britbike community. Thanks for having me as a member! My first post:

Could not resist making an offer on an advertised Craigslist 68 basket case 650 Lightning. The seller, an obvious bike nut with a row of Ducatis and BMWs in his garage sold it to me for $550 with an anecdote that it was sitting in the basket for years and he got it from uncle with no time to mess with. He said there was no title and no serial number on the frame which almost killed the deal for me, and no idea how complete it is. No seat obviously. I thought the dual port head might be worth enough to save me and took it all home with a signed bill of sale. Also has a new front fork and nice Dunlops.

Turns out the engine is a 71, has an OIF with serial #83 2109 stamped on the bottom of the weldment fitting at the kickstand and GR 5 on the top. Also stamped on the frame on the weldment fitting directly opposite the kickstand is the same #83 2109 with GR 23 on the bottom. The tank is also from a third bike, I think.

Will post some pics when I figure out how to drag and drop or upload, no?

Anyhow, any thoughts on the OIF stamping would be highly appreciated.

Probably should put some personal notes in my membership folder. I'm x-Norton Atlas from 40 years ago; drove it across the USA. x- 65 Panhead, so I know how to chase oil leaks. Still have a 93 FXDL and a R1200RT. Last motor I built was a Porsche 911 which is still in the stable. Drive BMW and Mercedes cars, all wrenched by me.

Will buy forum staff a pint or three! Cheers!!!
Liked Replies
by The Bonneville Shop
The Bonneville Shop
Hey Bustednukel, the serial number on the frame usually appears in the vicinity of the headstock on the oil in frames, possibly on the gusset, or the top or down tubes, even on the headstock itself. The 83 2109 number you see could be a production reference number, as the frame part number is 83-2802, as listed in the 1971 and 1972 parts books. BSA used casting numbers on various parts that were usually similar to the actual part numbers in the parts catalogues. As mentioned previously, the engine numbers are on the raised pad below the cylinder base on the drive-side crankcase. The 1971-72 A65 engines are easy to identify, as they had the Triumph-style clutch actuator, where the cable exited the outer timing cover vertically, as well as 3/8" UNF cylinder base studs. Aside from the A70 750cc engine, they are perhaps the most sought after A65 engines due to their refinements over the previous iterations. Good score!
-Dave
1 member likes this
by kommando
kommando
Radiator shops have hot tanks with an alkaline solution, good at removing paint, grease and rust.
1 member likes this
by quinten
quinten
Originally Posted by Allan G
What is “hot tank the frame”?

Something along the lines of a big tank of caustic hot water
or other cleaning solution , that can be agitated
while the whole part in dipped
[Linked Image from s19529.pcdn.co]
1 member likes this
by Mark Z
Mark Z
Originally Posted by The Bonneville Shop
If the oil pump was disassembled, cleaned, and reassembled without any hint of drag on the gears (when turning the spindle by hand), you got lucky! Every one I ever tried to refresh and inspect always had a little drag after putting back together. I learned after the first couple of A65 engine overhauls that if the pump turns smoothly and the drive gear is not knackered, flush it with solvent and leave it together. The gears wear in a pattern, and essentially are "married" together. When the pump is reassembled, if the gears are not precisely fitted as they were originally, the result is a slight drag. I agonized about this on my first BSA engine overhaul, a 1970 A50, but just refitted the pump and never had an issue with it during the year I rode it as a daily rider, nor did the guy that bought it from me. -Dave

Yes Dave, I kind of hinted around at the same thing, but I didn't want to give Busted heartburn. I had the same experience with the first oil pump I took apart. It never turned again, after four or five attempts at reassembly, and I then had to toss it in the junk bin and replace it. (I still have that oil pump, circa 1973!)
1 member likes this
by The Bonneville Shop
The Bonneville Shop
If the oil pump was disassembled, cleaned, and reassembled without any hint of drag on the gears (when turning the spindle by hand), you got lucky! Every one I ever tried to refresh and inspect always had a little drag after putting back together. I learned after the first couple of A65 engine overhauls that if the pump turns smoothly and the drive gear is not knackered, flush it with solvent and leave it together. The gears wear in a pattern, and essentially are "married" together. When the pump is reassembled, if the gears are not precisely fitted as they were originally, the result is a slight drag. I agonized about this on my first BSA engine overhaul, a 1970 A50, but just refitted the pump and never had an issue with it during the year I rode it as a daily rider, nor did the guy that bought it from me. The reproduction black-face gauges are available from us for around $150 for the pair.They are, by the way, a bit taller than the original Smith's instruments, so they stand a little proud in the binnacles.
-Dave
1 member likes this
by DMadigan
DMadigan
You need a link image to an file. Left mouse click on the picture in flickr, in the lower right there is a down arrow (download this photo). Click on that. When the picture comes up, select a size (medium is good), then right mouse click on the picture. A menu comes up. The forth line down is "Copy image link". Selelct that then in Britbike use the picture icon. It will bring up a window. Paste the image link there.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
1 member likes this
by NickL
NickL
It's more likely that the clutch has spun on the shaft at some time looking
at the keyway and the taper.
Nice round dogs on mainshaft 2nd too.
1 member likes this
by NickL
NickL
Originally Posted by Allan G
The 68 cam plates have it, the ones that followed don’t need it. But if you fit the bridge or a 68 style cam plate into an oif then you’ll also need to grind away some of the casting inside the box To clear the bridge

You should check any of the camplates for full clear movement, later plates in early engines are also prone
to fouling. The best places to weld bridges is where 2nd and 3rd are selected, but only really required for racing.
The beezer 'fix' was rubbish, too thin and bent should be a solid strap just filed out enough to clear the fork roller.
1 member likes this
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