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Thread Like Summary
BeezaBryan, Boomer, GrandPaul, Hillbilly bike, Jon W. Whitley, kevin, PINEMONKEY, ricochetrider, Roadwarrior, wadeschields, Zimm
Total Likes: 19
Original Post (Thread Starter)
by Richrd
Richrd
I purchased a gas tank from a member and it was shipped from Vt. on 12-19. According to tracking, it arrived in Jersey City on 12-25.

SIX DAYS?

Ever since then the tracking site just says "in transit, arriving late"

I ask the local post office why they even bother with tracking numbers if there is no tracking information provided. They're answer is "well, we've been busy"

not only that but I hate winter and trying to get decent spares for Ducati singles is harder than brit stuff.
Liked Replies
by Zimm
Zimm
I have seen service degradations as well.

Consider this: Both UPS and Fed Ex control their volumes, with excess being diverted to USPS. That, coupled with the huge increase in online shopping, has resulted in huge volume increases in package business for USPS. They did not anticipate this, did not increase resources, and are overwhelmed.

Regrettably, the notion that USPS is in financial trouble is something of a myth. They are forced to use a different accounting model than other Government departments which makes their results look bad. From a cash flow perspective, they are fine. Much of this appears to be an effort to privatize some or all of one of the few Fed operations that worked well.

When you consider whether the private sector can do things better, consider the massive amounts of money that defense contractors are paid to do work that was done by the troops in the past. Food service is contracted out, lots of supply is contracted out, painting the rocks is contracted out. All at big dollars when comparted to what a buck private cost in the past. How much was spent with Blackrock in Iraq, for example.

There really needs to be an adult conversation as to what services Government should provide and how they should be paid for. Trouble is, there are fefw if any adults in the room.
2 members like this
by Zimm
Zimm
Now that I am about in the middle of my 7th decade, I find that I am less bothered by stuff than I used to be.

You want to self identify as a Poodle? Fine with me, just don't poop on my lawn or try to hump my leg. Whatever. You think I need a haircut? Thats your problem dude, I don't even waste energy telling such people to FO, as I did in my early 20s. You wanna be a [***]? Fine, whatever, just leave me out of it. Ask what kind of Harley my M20 is? Sorry you are dumb. Can't fix that for you, so move along now.

On the other hand, somethings really light me up: Don't put the shopping cart back? You are dead to me. Dead I say.

I could rant on for hours, being as I am trying to rock being a cranky old guy.
2 members like this
by ricochetrider
ricochetrider
I personally had a lens shipped to me, Priority Mail in late-mid December. It was supposed to be delivered on Dec 22. For days on end al th tracking said was, "arriving late, in transit to the next facility". Late. yesterday afternoon, I received and email saying it had arrived at the sorting facility in Harrisburg and was on en route to its destination- which I assume is my local Post Office. A c couple more tracking. notices overnight as it went from one place to another (or whatever) and by the time I woke up the lens was "out for delivery" and "to be delivered by 9:00 PM".

FINALLY thumbsup I bought this for a specific photography project which as it happens will have to e delayed while I [***] around the country attending to some "family matters". Maybe I'll carry the new glass along to get acquainted with it before I shoot anything critical.

Originally Posted by Boomer
. For some reason the appointed head of the USPS decided in October to curtail all overtime and dismantle sorting machines contributing to a slowdown of mail particularly in the middle of the country. Bill B...

Yes well the war is on against the USPS and that is absolute. The same person who sicced the dogs on the USPS also appointed people in every cabinet position who were the 100% antithesis of -and the enemy of- each agency they were appointed to oversee destroy.

I won't say anything further about that specifically to avoid the bullsh*t politics of the matter...

BUT I will say that I love the USPS and they have done a wonderful job over the course of my own lifetime. I'm sticking with them no matter what. Apparently I'm not alone:

"The Postal Service is very popular, especially with rural Americans. Surveys consistently find the Postal Service among the most popular government agencies, with 91% of Americans expressing approval in a March 2020 Pew poll (Pew Research Center 2020). A RAND poll conducted in May found the Postal Service was second only to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in public trust, with rural Americans, who tend to vote Republican, giving it especially high marks (Pollard and Davis 2020; Parker et al. 2018)."

this from a rather epic study of the USPS by EPI.org - the Economic Policy Institute. Read the full, exhaustively comprehensive report HERE

This report, titled & subtitled thusly, is from December 22, 2020 so the ink is still fresh on this one:

The War Against The Postal Service

Postal services should be expanded for the public good, not diminished by special interests
1 member likes this
by Ob1quixote
Ob1quixote
Postal changes were started more than 4 years ago...
1 member likes this
by Ob1quixote
Ob1quixote
And with the losses it experiences, something has needed to be changed for a lot longer than 4 years.
1 member likes this
by Lannis
Lannis
Originally Posted by Hillbilly bike
As an electrician I worked on gov't projects with private contractors. In every situation there were cost overuns due to constant and often unwarranted changes. It seemed like every gov't official wanted his say on the project...Some might call this corruption...

It might be corruption in some or many cases ... but the main reason that (unlike the French) we do not and never have had a standardized nuclear power plant design is because "Everyone Wanted His Say", whether it meant more money for them or not. Every one of them is a custom-built one-off, as if we are starting from scratch.

The reason is that the utility operators want everything just like THEY have always done it, which is different from everyone else. When we DID try to implement standardized French designs for American power utilities, the operator wouldn't have it. If something was red, it had to be blue - if it was a pushbutton, it had to be a lever - if it was 250 volts it had to be 249 volts, or they wouldn't sign off on it.

So we never got to amortize the work that had already been done, the NRC had to approve new design changes, and the costs skyrocketed. Maybe someone was making some money on the side, but most of it was "I'm In Charge Here, and It's Going To Be Done MY Way!" even if that "way" was demonstrably inferior. Nobody was in charge to tell them "Here's the new power plant - the rest of the world uses it, get used to it."

It's human nature. We even see it in the infamous "Oil Threads" on our bike forums. Nobody's got any good reason to use something besides the manufacturers' suggestions - they just want to be different, to be part of an Inner Clique that knows the Secret Sauce, and not look like they're being anybody's "boy", especially not to the guy who wrote the manual!

Lannis
1 member likes this
by Lannis
Lannis
Originally Posted by Hugh Jörgen
1.60 adjusted for inflation: $10.73
https://www.in2013dollars.com/us/inflation/1970?amount=1.60#:~:text=Value%20of%20%241.60%20from%201970,cumulative%20price%20increase%20of%20570.69%25.

McDonalds cashier position in Appalachia: 8.00/hr
https://www.indeed.com/q-McDonalds-l-Appalachia,-VA-jobs.html

Since it's not about a living wage, maybe minimum wage should be $0.00?

Nobody's family could "live on" $3200 a year in 1970, nor on $21,000 a year now, nor on $16,000 a year in Appalachia. Again, that's not what it's about. Everyone can't flip burgers or shovel shyte forever; you get experience and move on. That's what everyone on this list did.

Make it $0? Or make it $40.00 an hour so that everyone makes $80,000 a year? Or, shoot, why not $100 an hour, make everyone wealthy!

The government has always been notoriously bad when it comes to wage and price controls. Exploring how "high" it can go is like exploring "the limits of traction" on a racetrack. There's only one way to find out where it really is, and the result is always the same. Those who cannot remember history are condemned to repeat it.

Lannis
1 member likes this
by ricochetrider
ricochetrider
If you read the EPI report I linked you'll see that the post office is pretty heavily restricted by the federal government- the USPS cannot, by LAW operate in the same manner and with the same freedoms of private businesses. This began I believe in 2005 06 2006 (which would have been under Bush Jr administration).

There is no one reason and certainly no simple reason why the United Staes Postal Service has the problems it has. IF you REALLY want to know the WHOLE story READ THE STUDY REPORT from the Economic Policy Institute. IF you don't know who they are here's their own blurb explaining about them and what they do:

Economic Policy Institute’s mission is to inform and empower individuals to seek solutions that ensure broadly shared prosperity and opportunity.

About EPI. The Economic Policy Institute (EPI) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan think tank created in 1986 to include the needs of low- and middle-income workers in economic policy discussions. EPI believes every working person deserves a good job with fair pay, affordable health care, and retirement security. To achieve this goal, EPI conducts research and analysis on the economic status of working America. EPI proposes public policies that protect and improve the economic conditions of low- and middle-income workers and assesses policies with respect to how they affect those workers.



It's always best to complain and talk smack from a position of knowledge than to just randomly b*tch & moan without any understanding of what you're complaining about. Read the link and inform yourselves.

EDIT Ok I'll make it easy on you. Except I'm cherry picking, RE: points mentioned above. IF you wish to fully inform YOURSELVES, (LOL who tf am I kidding)
READ the report.



I'll admit the report does mention the President's attacks on, and grievances with, the postal service. The report mentions the constant barrage of conservative measures to privatize and restrict the post office and to bolster private corporations against USPS success and its longstanding but degraded monopolies. While you may see this as some sort of liberal bias or partisan politics, the report simply states the facts of these matters and also supplies, not links to each act or court case but does name each instance of attack or degradation or attempts to privatize or bolster corporate competitiveness against the USPS. The report mentions the constant lobbying of private businesses such as FedEx and UPS - to name only major, household-name companies- against the USPS.

Call it what you want and like it or not- but these are the facts of the matter and these facts along with many many others things before and behind them constitute a large portion of the core of your complaints. The story of the fight against the USPS is a long and complex tale, and new chapters are added all the time.



Privatization is a long-standing goal of think tanks and corporations that stand to gain from weakening or dismantling the Postal Service.
While politics and ideology play a role in privatization efforts, the driving force is special interests—large corporations such as United Parcel Service, FedEx, and Pitney Bowes that seek to take advantage of the same network and scale economies as the Postal Service to capture an even larger share of the shipping and mail-processing markets without shouldering the Postal Service’s public service responsibilities. These corporations not only lobby Congress and the Postal Regulatory Commission but also exert an unusual amount of influence through industry advisory groups that operate behind closed doors.

The Postal Service is restricted in its ability to enter new markets, a restriction that benefits competitors but not consumers. In particular, the financial services industry has an interest in preventing the Postal Service from reviving postal banking, which would greatly benefit unbanked and underbanked communities that currently rely on high-cost payday lenders and other alternative financial services.

Meanwhile, the Postal Service is being hollowed out by outsourcing and constrained in its ability to compete in parcel delivery, with negative effects on consumers and workers. Laws designed to prevent government agencies from lowering labor standards by outsourcing to low-wage companies do not apply to bulk mailers and other companies that perform processing and transportation tasks that would otherwise be done by the Postal Service—and receive deep discounts in exchange. The Postal Service itself does not benefit from these “workshare” arrangements because the cost savings are fully passed on to the companies, many of which are competitive only because they pay low wages. The new postmaster general, Louis DeJoy, previously headed a logistics company that performed outsourced postal work and engaged in illegal anti-union activities


furthermore

Restrictions on what the Postal Service and its private-sector competitors can and cannot do have always been points of contention (Ryan 1999). The Postal Service lost its monopoly on express mail delivery in 1979 and has long competed with private companies in package delivery. These activities are circumscribed, with the Postal Service subjected to fluctuating weight and size limits on packages over the years, for example. FedEx, a pioneer in express air delivery, and UPS, which since its inception has focused on larger parcels, jealously guard against what they view as encroachment by the Postal Service.

Protecting private-sector companies against competition from the Postal Service is often treated as an end in itself, whether or not it serves a public purpose. In 1952, for example, Congress reduced the Postal Service’s package weight limit to 40 pounds in a futile effort to prop up a competing railroad-based delivery service (USPS 2020d). Generally, relaxing these limits has benefited consumers and companies relying on home delivery. When a four-pound weight limit was lifted in 1913 with the introduction of Parcel Post, Sears, Roebuck catalog orders increased fivefold within a year (USPS 2008b).

While competitors try to crack the postal monopoly, they resist Postal Service efforts to expand its competitive business. Former Postal Service Inspector General and Board Vice Chair David C. Williams, among others, has pointed out that the Postal Service could offer more services to offset the fixed cost of maintaining post offices and daily delivery (USPS OIG 2015b; HSGAC 2016; Brookings 2015b). Post offices, for example, could offer many printing and other services provided by FedEx Office and The UPS Store, and expand the use of parcel delivery lockers (USPS OIG 2013). Likewise, mail carriers could pick up and make deliveries from local stores, including groceries (Chandler 2014).


The bottom line is that historically the USPS is a much beloved and essential part of the fabric of American lives, especially in rural communities where common urban & suburban services such as UPS or other direct competitors don't exist. AS I posted yesterday, the USPS currently scores highly, and has ALWAYS scored extremely high points with all their customers, from all sides, across all political party lines.

Privatization of all things I have any experience with (parking authority, Water utilities, to name 2) ALWAYS means higher prices and lower grades of customer service and support.

Privatization means "profit over all else" and while that might not be too horrible as a GENERAL way to look at things, when it's life sustaining like water, or a long standing entity that offers a rock solid, universally loved service to ALL citizens no matter where they may live, then look at how F'd up things get when sheer profit is the only operational ethos.

I don't know about you guys but where I live we used to have a good number of local lumber yards, cabinet shops, electrical & plumbing supply places, and appliance & hardware stores. In one town I lived in, Carlisle PA, back when Lowes first opened their store, damn near every single builder or contractor in the whole area went running over there, these dumbasses turned their backs on the local, family owned & operated lumber yards and hardware stores who had served them faithfully for decades, for generations. It was as if they never existed.

BUT a few years in, once these same builders and contractors realized the products were all [email protected], the variety was very limited, and there was near zero customer service after the sale from Lowes (& Home Depot by then) it was too late because all the lumber yards and hardware stores and closed up shop. Most of the electrical s supply stores closed as did the plumbing supply places- only the biggest national chain suppliers remained. Almost all of the local appliance stores closed too. These @sh0les had the nerve to make a public outcry over the fact that all the services they USED to take for granted, the ones they turned their backs on- had closed!

Two major chain stores, Home Depot & Lowes wiped out all those services and all those jobs. Not only in Carlisle PA but all across our once-mighty Homeland. Who here LOVES these two stores?
The story is very similar with WalMart: Jobs and services lost, replaced by a faceless entity without heart.

The same thing is going to happen with the USPS IF A it gets privatized, or B if USPS goes away altogether & UPS & FedEx et al end up being our only services for mail delivery and shipping of small packages. Maybe not you 5 or 7 or 10 people, but a great many WILL indeed miss the USPS. SO let's not see anyone crying about UPS or FedEx if you live to see the day the government finally kills the Postal Service.

OK guys that's it, cry, p1ss, b*tch & moan in peace.
Have a fabulous day.
1 member likes this
by DavidP
DavidP
Originally Posted by HughdeMann
All I can say about the post office is this. I'd happily pay more to use UPS. They know what the term tracking means, they get things here when they say they will, and when I send things out they arrive on time.
At least the Postal Service doesn't leave my package on the porch across the street!
1 member likes this
by Lannis
Lannis
Originally Posted by GrandPaul
Originally Posted by Zimm
There really needs to be an adult conversation as to what services Government should provide and how they should be paid for. Trouble is, there are few if any adults in the room.
Here, here!

Sadly, at the rate our government is morphing into the entrenched 2-party mob system, that day will never come without bloodshed on a massive scale.

Actually, a sort of entrenched Uniparty. Hard to tell the difference any more. thumbsdown

For me, all politics is local - I campaign for, and give to, the local county and state candidates that I support; I know my county supervisor, state delegate, my state senator, and my US congressman personally. You can't do anything about the rest of it; the old "social contract" is broken, so you have to do like Gandhi - if enough people ignore the dictatorial orders and unconstitutional laws of an illegitimate elite, they haven't got enough fixers to do anything about it, and things'll have to change. 2c

Looks like there ARE a few adults in the room from what I can see! thumbsup

Rant over; the Post Office has something for me that wouldn't fit into the box - maybe it's the item I ordered 2 months ago! wink

Lannis
1 member likes this
by Lannis
Lannis
Originally Posted by GrandPaul
Originally Posted by Lannis
My plumber is a guy named Victor...

He's made a good living all these years, he has hundreds of friends, NO ONE is bad-mouthing him. I don't know why more people can't be like that unless it's just love of the almighty dollar...

I'm all for folks bettering themselves, working hard, charging what the market will bear (depending on what "bear" means - in this case it means that very many people use plumbers as a prime example of overcharging barstewards), and all that.

I worked hard myself, and I COULD have made a lot more money if I had moved somewhere where opportunities were better and salaries were higher, but where I'd have been miserable with a lower quality of life, and IF I had spent time away from my family to a degree that would have hurt them and me. I like making money, but not that badly .... !

Sounds like a lot of folks here have made those same compromises.

Lannis
1 member likes this
by henryanthony
henryanthony
Originally Posted by Hugh Jörgen
Originally Posted by GrandPaul
...A quick search will show the vast majority of politicians are/were alleged attorneys.

This was not meant to be...

The Founding Fathers.
As many as thirty-five including Adams, Hamilton, Jefferson, Madison, and Jay were trained as lawyers though not all of them practiced law. Some had also been local judges.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Founding_Fathers_of_the_United_States#Occupations

Maybe this is because the colonists wanted a nation of laws and not a kingdom?
1 member likes this
by kevin
kevin
well, there ar eonly three kinds of loads.

a preload is when you show up with an empty trailer and swap it for one that the customer has already loaded-- steel of all kinds, dressed lumber, manufactured hvac equipment. its on the trailer already, so you just add your own straps, chains, and taps and take off, leaving the empty for them to load for spomeone else.

a live load is when you show up and they load you right then and there. lumber, military vehicles, rolls of newsprint, boulders, shipping containers, shingles, farm tractors, could be anything. they load you with their own equipment.

and then there's drop and hook, where you show up somewhere with a loaded trailer, leave it, and drive away with an empty one. or vise versa. usually larger distribution centers like lowes or walmart.

none of thee loads involve the driver doing anything but watching, and you are always forbiddenn to drive their forklift, operate their overhead cranes, or do anything with the loading except to specify how yoou want it placed on the truck. so i can't touch anything, but i customarily work with the crane operators or forklift drivers to put things where i want them.

that's important, because your permissible axle weights are determined by law.i can carry 13,000 or so on the front axle, 34,000 on the drivves, and thenan 40,000 on the rear of a flatbed trailer if the axles are ten feet apart. to stay under the limit of 80,000 pounds i might carry a 47,000 pound steel coil, and i will place it 18 inches to thhe rear of the trailer center in order to not exceed 34,000 in the fron or 40,000 in the rear. there's an art to loading the trbuck that you develop a skill in, because you sometimes have to carry three or four very heavy objects of different wieghts like spulley sheaves for strip mine equipment or plate steel, and a foot either way will exceed an axle weight front or back.

but the only equipment i can personally use to help load is a hand truck oor pallet jack,.in lots of places i am not permitted to help because the help is unionized. groocery supply centers have dedicated lumpers on the premises, who i have to pay to unload the customer's goods onto the customer's dock. they won't let me use thier equipment, because they make money from me.

i've never been anywhere that i was allowed to load or unload the truck

in america you can drive up to 80,000 pounds gross without an overweight permit, so your typical weight is around 79,000 +/-pounds. right now i drive oil field tankers and routinely carry illegal loads of up to 88,000 pounds. sometimes in the bigger trucks we load close to 97,000 pounds. you either do that or you don't have a job.
1 member likes this
by kevin
kevin
it has a clutch but i dont use it much. thers so much inertia in the rotating assembly that you can float the transmission and then wiggle between gears before the motor knows what youre doing

not so much time on hills tho so the clutch is useful then
1 member likes this
by Zimm
Zimm
When I shipped my A10 motor to the Carter Brothers in 2015, I built a plywood crate. The drive end of the crank was sunk into a block and I modified some extra mounts to be able to bolt it in solidly. The whole thing weighed just under the 150 # limit. Mike took as much care packing it on the return trip. It arrived in front of my garage door, on its side despite the big arrow. Good news is that everything was fine.
Attached Images
1 member likes this
by DavidP
DavidP
Originally Posted by GrandPaul
Fort all intents and purposes, and all evidence pointing to the obvious, it is just another typical inefficient, bloated, government agency.
Sadly the USPS falls under your favorite executive's purview. You know, the people who think that everything should be run as the private sector. The private sector does away with real pensions, they can't force that on the postal employees so they cripple that pension system with onerous pre-funding requirements.
https://www.brookings.edu/blog/up-f...-u-s-postal-service-governed-and-funded/
UPS and Fedex are not required to, and will not, deliver to every address in the United States, and often hand the package off to USPS for local delivery.
I've had no issues with the Postal Service, and the only time I see goofy routing is from private delivery services. A Fedex package ordered from Atlanta goes to Mississippi, then to Memphis then here, in EAST Tennessee.
At least the USPS leaves my package on MY porch, not the one across the street, as UPS has done several times.
1 member likes this
by rick e.
rick e.
Originally Posted by DavidP
Originally Posted by GrandPaul
Fort all intents and purposes, and all evidence pointing to the obvious, it is just another typical inefficient, bloated, government agency.
Sadly the USPS falls under your favorite executive's purview. You know, the people who think that everything should be run as the private sector. The private sector does away with real pensions, they can't force that on the postal employees so they cripple that pension system with onerous pre-funding requirements.
https://www.brookings.edu/blog/up-f...-u-s-postal-service-governed-and-funded/
UPS and Fedex are not required to, and will not, deliver to every address in the United States, and often hand the package off to USPS for local delivery.
I've had no issues with the Postal Service, and the only time I see goofy routing is from private delivery services. A Fedex package ordered from Atlanta goes to Mississippi, then to Memphis then here, in EAST Tennessee.
At least the USPS leaves my package on MY porch, not the one across the street, as UPS has done several times.

I have had my share of problems with USPS, but trust me, you do not want them to go away, especially if you live in the sticks.
1 member likes this
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