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Ian Ashdown
Ian Ashdown
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Thread Like Summary
chainreaction, Cyborg, GrandPaul, gREgg-K, Hugh Jörgen, Magnetoman, Stuart Kirk
Total Likes: 18
Original Post (Thread Starter)
#828313 10/30/2020 5:52 PM
by Bry
Bry
Here is the basis of my next project. It's a 1937 Rudge Ulster, bought as a mostly complete, but partially dismantled and started restoration by the previous owner.

It's my first dabble into the Rudge world so I have a lot of reading to do and figuring out exactly what I have and how to best to approach the restoration process.

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#839410 Feb 8th a 05:20 PM
by Bry
Bry
...there were two oil tanks that came with the bike, one has a hole where the threaded fixing boss for the spacer bolt connecting to the battery carrier has broken out. The other one has had the same boss and threaded hole soldered up, presumably because it had also been damaged and was leaking.

As the tanks are fabricated using soft soldering, after removing the paint, I decided to desolder (using MAP gas and an airline), clean and re-solder the best of the two tanks

I took the opportunity to knock out some small dents in the tank while it was apart.

When reassembling I made a larger doubler plate to reinforce the threaded boss that was leaking.

Upon inspection of the connection fittings - the filler neck, oil outlet connection and drain plug fitting all looked sound, but the oil inlet connection had a crack in the solder on the inside. So this was removed and cleaned also and refitted with a reinforcement collar.

After tinning, I re-soldered using 40/60 tinmans stick solder and a butane torch.

Seems to have sealed up well but I will leave it sitting for a few days full of white spirit as a leak test, I'll then low pressure air test it and inspect using snoop liquid.

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3 members like this
#830558 Nov 21st a 10:15 PM
by Bry
Bry
...a bit more work on worn linkages today, with the stand operating lever mechanism. It was working ok but the side to side movement at the handle was excessive. So similar to what I did with the gear lever, I decided to ream out the linkage holes and make oversized pivot bolts from stainless steel.

I measured the lifting handle pivot boss and pin along their length and the wear was not only oval in section but it was found to be hour glass/barrelled. I suppose this is understandable for 80+ years of wear where the handle is not pulled directly up but also with some lateral force. I used an expanding reamer to get the bore consistent along the length of the boss then finished it with a regular hand reamer.

There was also a problem with the handle hitting the foot rest which didn't look right. After a bit of investigation it tuned out that there should be an eccentric stop which was missing. I think this is the correct arrangement for this model year, there are also listed also a cross tube and bolts between the engine plates which act as a stand stop, seemingly for for earlier models. As the factory drawing for this part is available I made one from stainless steel bar.

There are also indents in the bottom edge of the engine plates where they interface with the stops on the stand when it's in the deployed position. I'll build these up with weld when the plates are off the bike.

Upon reassembly the operation was found to be much smoother and firmer.

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2 members like this
#834555 Dec 26th a 11:32 PM
by Bry
Bry
Originally Posted by Cyborg
...Would you happen to have a link to the drawings that you used? Although looks straight forward and could just wing it in the usual fashion

I didn't use drawings and just measured and made as I went along. Below is a link to the Youtube video I found of the most help to give me the general idea of how to put this together (there are several others). Note the modification to allow adjusting the boring head from the back side which is more easily accessed when the assembly is mounted in the tool post. The involves drilling and tapping the end of the adjusting screw and fitting a grub screw with loctite, I did this and it works well.

I did make a basic sketch to verify the minimum tapered relief needed for the cutting tool to give sufficient clearance when cutting a ball/radius at the max setting on the boring head. This makes the tool more rigid and this may be why I don't get the chatter the bloke the video experiences when he demo's his tool.

2 members like this
#834853 Dec 29th a 11:04 PM
by Bry
Bry
...I got the mudguards back from getting the powder coating removed. they were chemically stripped then soda blasted. There there is evidence of quite a bit of pitting corrosion and the thickness was reduced by corrosion around some of the bolt holes but they're certainly salvageable.

There were some minor dents that were worked out with a planishing hammer and dolly.

Filling the surplus and damaged holes required a bit of plating and welding. The method I used was to clean up the holes with a round file then using a step drill to open them up until they were round and removing the corroded feather edges. Discs of 1mm mild steel sheet were then punched out to match the hole diameters, then formed to match the curve of the mudguard profile. The discs were adjusted by minor filing and stretching by peening to be a press fit in the holes and supported by a copper backing strip clamped in place. After tacking they were TIG welded in place, this proved to be a bit of a challenge as the old corroded metal was "fizzing" due to the contaminates and wanting to blow through. Not the prettiest of welds as result but they are ground flush anyway.

Also, this was the first time I tried my new true colour welding mask, it's like someone turned the lights on (in a good way), I can highly recommend to anyone who does a bit of welding.

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#832979 Dec 11th a 10:22 PM
by Bry
Bry
Originally Posted by Magnetoman
Originally Posted by Bry
the easy access to the original factory drawings,
Did you mention where you got copies of the factory drawings? I just skimmed your previous posts without spotting a mention of it. Not that I imagine a Rudge in my future, but I'm always interested in the source of such documents.

I hadn’t mentioned it. They are available to members of the Rudge Enthusiasts Club via download from their website, there is also the Rudge-Whitworth.com website that is free to register, this is a great site with a fantastic archive of drawings and technical information. The bloke who runs the website produces an excellent series of documents called Remedies that provide detailed information on all things Rudge and in many cases advises on any necessary corrections to errors in the original factory drawings and technical information availble elsewhere.
1 member likes this
#833293 Dec 14th a 09:11 PM
by Bry
Bry
Originally Posted by GrandPaul
DANG!

Those pipes came out fantastic!

"Oily Rag" condition, perfect.

I have used the aluminium foil and WD40 method on chromium plating a few times recently and am impressed at how effective it is without dulling the surface finish.
1 member likes this
#834823 Dec 29th a 06:35 PM
by Alex
Alex
Originally Posted by GrandPaul
Hey, Alex, long time no see.

You still racing at all?

Nope. Other priorities right now but I hope to be back playing in the dirt at least next year.
1 member likes this
#834952 Dec 30th a 09:10 PM
by Bry
Bry
Originally Posted by Cyborg
Did you make the dies for punching out the discs?

No, it was purchased. Sold as a jewellers disc cutter for use with a hammer, but works well on 1mm ms sheet in a hydraulic press.
1 member likes this
#836393 Jan 12th a 02:46 AM
by Stuart Kirk
Stuart Kirk
Originally Posted by Cyborg
I had a look at those disc cutters.
Take a sheet of your patch metal to your local metalworker who has a Rotex punch. Ask him to punch some holes in it but to please collect up and save the discs for you. Our local guy looked at me funny until I explained they were to make synchro spring shims for a Jag Moss box. I had 4 different thicknesses that he punched and carefully collected up for me.
1 member likes this
#836025 Jan 8th a 10:35 PM
by Bry
Bry
...some progress on assembling the rear mudguard, but the fit between the fixed and removable sections needs to be better. I will try a bit more bending and hammering but I may need to make a wooden buck to reform the edge of the fixed section.

I finally received the stainless steel hex bar stock that I order before xmas, so was able to get some more fasteners made.



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#836877 Jan 15th a 11:19 PM
by Bry
Bry
...fitted the new tool box that was among the parts that came with the bike. It is very well made and fitted well. I did need to make some minor adjustments to the front bracket and make a new rear bracket - which was missing - out of mild steel flat bar.

The tool box seems to be in the correct location based on dimensions for the mounting holes that I found and period catalogue images, but it does rest on the pillion foot rest boss when open, it's not really a problem and I suppose it's supposed to be like this?

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#847518 Apr 29th a 10:23 PM
by Bry
Bry
...some minor progress. I straightened the foot rests and supports, they weren't far out and I was able to cold bend them back into the correct position.

I fitted the replacement gearbox foot control ratchet centre and bottom locking plates. I made a CAD drawing from the factory print and sent the file off to a bloke who profile plasma cut the plates. The bolt holes were undersized on the plasma cutting profile drawing so that they could be reamed to final size. The bolt holes on the centre plate were match drilled with the corresponding holes in the top and bottom plates after orientating the control ratchet peardrop assembly into the optimal position, as advised on the original factory drawing. The internal ratchet mechanism components were all found to be in good condition so I only replaced the springs, cleaned, greased and reassembled in the peardrop housing.

The gearbox casing screws were replaced with (what I believe) are the correct ones for the year. However, I was concerned with the limited clearance between the end of the swivel bolt for the foot change link rod and the mechanism cover, so I made up a custom bolt and swivel assembly to provide a bit more clearance.


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