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George Kaplan, GrandPaul, gREgg-K, gunner, Hugh Jörgen, Magnetoman, NYBSAGUY
Total Likes: 45
Original Post (Thread Starter)
by Magnetoman
Magnetoman
And now for something completely different, as Monty Python might say. A search of the 'Projects' forum didn't turn up anything similar to what will follow in this thread, which either means no one will care about what I will post, or that (I hope) it's just that no one has documented such a project before. I also searched the web without finding anything close to what will follow.

Anyway, on last year's Cannonball the Big D Cycle team had a flotilla of trucks, trailers, and tents along with a platoon of mechanics to support their three riders (and me, in a time of need in the wilderness of Pierre SD, for which I am quite grateful). Another team had a full-size bus towing a huge, double-deck trailer with internal elevator. But, aside from those and a few other mobile factories, there also were thirty or so "reasonable-size" support trailers that served their teams quite nicely, and certainly were better for the purpose than our U-Haul truck.

During the evenings I took photographs and made notes of the various useful features I saw. Although no single trailer had all of the features I thought would be useful for my purposes, all could be incorporated in a 6'x12' enclosed cargo trailer.

OK, pausing for a few definitions:

--By "reasonable-size" I had decided that for my purposes an enclosed 6'x12' trailer was optimum although 6'x10' (a bit too small) or 6'x14' (unnecessarily long) could be acceptable. Of course, if your purposes are different, your optimum size might be as well.

-- By "my purposes" I mean a trailer into which two bikes can be easily loaded (possibly three with some creative loading), along with spares, supplies, and tools for hauling hundreds of miles from here for at least several days' worth of riding. Up to two additional bikes fit in the pickup bed so this would allow hauling more bikes and friends than I even have friends...

-- Although "my purposes" doesn't necessarily mean riding in the Cannonball again, customizing a trailer according to the notes I took means it would be quite nice for that as well. Everything needed for a lengthy Cannonball-type ride would be in the form of add-on items (e.g. pop-up awning, bike hoist, etc.), not intrinsic to the customized trailer.

Although from time to time over the past year I considered horse trailers (which are in much greater abundance around here), one of them would have taken a lot of work to enclose (leaving toolboxes and spare $25k Gold Stars visible to outsiders doesn't seem like a good idea). Anyway, slow and steady wins the race and last week I got a great price on the optimum-for-me 6'x12', which is now parked in my driveway ready to be customized with tie down points, workbench, tool boxes, lighting, etc.

[Linked Image]

Details of the modifications as I make them is what this thread will be about. So far all I've done to it is replace the fairly new, but UV-cracked tires with new ones, but items are on order and modifications are now about to start. However, I should note up front that this thread is going to take months to play out. All that I need for immediate purposes have a way to tie down two motorcycles. Once I've taken care of that I'll then take my time to customize it with all the features I want (bright LED lighting, sturdy workbench, cabinets, etc.).

As a hint of what is to come, the next two images are scale drawings of some of the features of my current, tentative layout. The strips in green are sections of E-Track. The three sections on the floor will let me hold two -- possibly three -- bikes, and are the only features of the design that I'm committed to for now.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]
Attached Images
Liked Replies
by Shane in Oz
Shane in Oz
Originally Posted by Magnetoman
Originally Posted by George Kaplan
I am not a big coffee fan but do drink it occasionally. The worst cup of coffee that I have ever had was ... in a dreaded Starbucks ...
Digressions into topics not nearly as fraught as global warming and electric vehicles should be fine, but I fear we still could be in dangerous territory with Englishmen commenting on coffee and Americans on tea.
Does this mean that tea threads are the new oil threads?
4 members like this
by Magnetoman
Magnetoman
Originally Posted by GrandPaul
With all the gizmos and gadgets, there's less and less room for the OCCUPANTS!
Originally Posted by Hugh Jörgen
Even more ironically, you can't fit a motorcycle in it now.
Au contraire, you doubters.

[Linked Image]

The recent trailer upgrades only have added a few ounces and removed a few cubic inches from the interior so it still can hold three Gold Stars plus another ~120 lbs. With my second covid shot four hours ago (woohoo!), I'm now as bulletproof as is possible,[*] emerging variants notwithstanding. Finally, a fraught year after finishing the trailer, I'm able to make plans to use it.

[*]Not to offer medical advice, which you shouldn't believe anyway because this is the internet, after all, but my reading of the current state of analysis by credible authorities of recent studies done after the general population started being vaccinated in early-December indicates two weeks after the first dose of Moderna the immunity is 75–90% and the second dose increases that to >90%, also after two weeks. Results depend to some extent on age, gender, and race but, leaving aside the percentages, my takeaway from these studies is that the vaccine very significantly reduces the chances of catching the disease, and for the few unlucky people who get it anyway, the vaccine very significantly reduces the severity and chances of death. Unfortunately, vaccinations are still too recent for long term studies to have been conducted so there's no data as yet for how long immunity lasts, even in the absence of the appearance of new variants. So, I'll continue to wear a mask, avoid crowds, and remain cautious as I roam the West with my trailer.

[Linked Image from s22658.pcdn.co]
Attached Images
3 members like this
by Magnetoman
Magnetoman
Before discussing covid's effects on using my trailer, somewhat more related to this thread (since the Cannonball inspired me to build this trailer) is that next Wednesday evening March 3 at 9 p.m. Eastern I'm scheduled to be interviewed about my Cannonball experiences on "Cannonball Chronicles," seen live on Facebook and Youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/user/MotorcycleCannonball

I'm told that viewers can upload questions for me when the segment is "live." I'm also told that although the above site only shows ~100 views each for previous interviews, that only counts people who later looked at the archived footage on that site. They claim their tracking service shows over 100k total "interactions" to each of the previous live interviews on the various social media sites that simultaneously plays them.

As for unvaccinated Canadians, the rate at which covid spread to the far corners of the globe a year ago shows we really are in this together.

[Linked Image]

Until it is stamped out everywhere it will continue to mutate inside the millions of unvaccinated people into new variants, any one of which could result in a mutation that makes the current vaccines impotent. If that happens, all of us will have to start all over again while millions more die.

There are major uncertainties in estimating the number of cases, but the number of vaccine doses shipped and administered is well documented. At this point only 2.8% of the world's population has received even one dose, which is a rate of only ~1%/month. If that rate somehow could be instantaneously increased by a factor of 8× worldwide it still would take another year from now before everyone was vaccinated. This means we're in this pandemic for the long haul

No individual country, or small group of countries, even pretends to be able to deal with such a global pandemic, which is why the World Health Organization is coordinating a response to get vaccines to the grey areas on the map.

[Linked Image]

There are anti-vaxers and whacko conspiracy theory proponents who live in their own versions of "reality," but everything I've written above is an actual documented, non-political, fact. If you disagree with anything I've written above based on "alternate facts" (i.e. fiction), please start your own thread to post your response.



Selfishly, I want enough people world-wide (yes, even Canadians) to be vaccinated ASAP so I can again travel, go to crowded restaurants, and meet with groups of friends.
Attached Images
3 members like this
by Magnetoman
Magnetoman
Originally Posted by George Kaplan
To put a positive spin on things.
My glass is way over half full so there's no need for spin. Even though it looks like my trailer will remain parked for at least another six months, and possibly much longer, until a safe and effective vaccine is available, I have plenty of other interesting things to keep me busy.

A weather front blew in yesterday and fall weather is finally here (i.e. the highest temperature in the 10-day forecast will be a cool 96 ℉). After avoiding the scorching desert sun for the past three months during the hottest summer on record, riding motorcycles is again possible. Hallelujah.
2 members like this
by Tridentman
Tridentman
MMan--- like you I am looking forward to using my trailers this year---them having had no use at all in 2020.
Unfortunately even if I wanted to use one now --they are both snowed in with four feet of snow.
Perhaps you could mail me some hot AZ air so that I can use them sooner?
My enclosed trailer has my Ural sidecar outfit in it.
Following your lead (no pun intended) I installed a mains electricity bulkhead connector last year so the Ural and the trailer breakaway batteries have been on Battery Tenders all winter.
I had my second vaccine shot a week ago so, like you, I am feeling invincible and immortal (as well as illiterate and innumerate).
Roll on some warmer weather!
2 members like this
by Tridentman
Tridentman
As I am too humble (for which read incompetent) to solve the energy problems of the world I will stick in this post to my simple trailer.
I have inspected it in its winter hibernation about once a month and did so again last Friday.
Everything seems good with the two battery tenders shining green so hopefully the trailer breakaway battery and the Ural sidecar outfit battery will be in great shape for summer usage.
Later this week we are breaking out from Covid restrictions and flying to California to see our two year old grandson who we have not seen for a year (so recommissioning the trailer has to wait for my return).
His mother is a hot shot corporate lawyer and his father owns a lobbying company.
So I feared for his possible bent towards engineering.
However we sent him a tool belt for Christmas and this is his most treasured possession--he refuses to take it off when going to bed!
When we last Facetimed a couple of days ago he said " Papa---my car is broken--please bring tools"---so maybe there is hope yet!
OK---MMan--back on the trailer thread I hope---please forgive my personal digression!
2 members like this
by Tridentman
Tridentman
One of the most essential items in my trailer is a milk crate.
Not of course for it being a milk crate per se but for what it contains.
It houses a small propane gas stove, a kettle, several bottles of water, a pack of tea bags, some powdered milk and a somewhat battered metal mug together with a couple of tea spoons.
This means that wherever I am--even if stranded in the middle of nowhere -- I can make myself a cup of tea.
BTW--did I mention that I am English?
2 members like this
by wadeschields
wadeschields
My wife (being English as well ) says the same thing... All of the English brands sold here are different then what they sell in the UK.... We find actual imported tea at british stores in The City or the Irish store in Harrisburg.... But our local Wegmans grocery store has an imported food section and even though they have PG Tips in the regular tea isle right beside the Liptons , The PG Tips in the imported isle seems to be the real deal.... Tetley tea is another one we get sometimes there. They sell Flakes and Jammy Dodger and other English sweets that I am trying to avoid now...

Back to trailers

I look inside peoples trailers when ever Im at shows because they fascinate me... I like the tiled floor some have and the tool boxes and work benches installed and the over night crowd have sleeping quarters . Always interesting how small the sleeping area is on some of them but I guess they think its better then a tent.
2 members like this
by Tridentman
Tridentman
As a matter of fact whenever one of my sons is due to visit us from England there is a standing order for two things---English tea and genuine "Made in England" Cadburys chocolate.
Cadburys is made in US under license by Hershey but it is not as creamy as the genuine article.
But-- oh!--we were talking about tea (not trailers I am afraid but at least both topics begin with the letter T!).
Yes the same brand of tea sold in England is different from that sold in US IMHO.
BTW--I only drink tea at home in US---I have never had a good cup of tea in a restaurant in US.
So I only drink coffee in a restaurant in US.
The reason?
In the US people think that they can make tea with hot water.
Every Englishman knows that to make tea you need boiling water--it makes a lot of difference.
Growing up in a working class home in UK tea was made in a tea pot using loose tea (not tea bags).
The tea pot was covered with a knitted cover called a tea cosy to keep it warm.
Looking back through undoubtedly rose tinted spectacles that tea was divine!

Just as a bit further of an aside some years ago I was involved in the technical selling of heat transfer equipment for large (10000-15000hp) diesel engines to manufacturers in Japan.
After a typically boozy dinner one evening with a Japanese customer the Vice President of the company leant close to me and said "You know Mr. Beard--we like dealing with the English--- the Germans are so rigid and the Americans are so loud'
"And there are three other reasons we like dealing with you. Firstly both Japan and England are islands. Secondly we both had empires and thirdly we both drink tea!"
Interestingly we got that order!
2 members like this
by NYBSAGUY
NYBSAGUY
My word, this thread has gone off on several different tracks, but who am I to complain. I am Irish, and I love both tea and coffee. It is possible to get good tea in the US, but first you have to find a source of good tea leaves. And that will not be in the tea section of the supermarket, where Twinings tea bags hold sway.

When I first moved to the US from England twenty six years ago, coffee was universally a muddy brown liquid with very little taste. That, too, has changed. Starbucks aside, it is possible to get very good coffee here, but you have to order good beans and make it yourself. You will rarely get good coffee in a retail outlet of any sort.

As you all know, I have stayed in MMan's vast mansion-in-the-desert, and can testify that he is a fellow coffee addict. He makes very good coffee, for a physicist, and usually needs several cups before he sits at his computer/lathe/mill/hone. My coffee is marginally better, but I have the advantage of not being a physicist.
2 members like this
by gunner
gunner
The likes of Starbucks, Costa and other coffee shop outlets seems to be a relatively recent development in the UK and one that I'm not very fond of as I find their coffee etc. is bland and bitter.

Having being brought up with with a mother who was European and a father who was half European, making real coffee and tea at home was a way of life and is the best way to get the rich flavors. Having dated several European girls, I found Germans liked it with cake (Kaffee mit Kuchen) and The French preferred it with Cognac and cream, I never got to find out what the Italian or Spanish liked best, so maybe I missed out on that, but I know they like it strong.

I still use an old fashioned coffee grinder to mill fresh beans and then use filter paper with a filter cone on top of the mug, I prefer it black with one sugar, as strong as I can get it.

Regarding tea, I agree with TridentMan and like a pot brewed with boiling water using something like Tetley's or Yorkshire Tea.
2 members like this
by Tridentman
Tridentman
I have the spare wheel on the frame of my open trailer but inside on my enclosed trailer.
I dont know where you store your trailer but mine see the sun when it is out so I fit wheel covers over the exposed wheels to delay the effect of uv on the rubber of the tires.
Just a comment offered in a constructive manner.
1 member likes this
by George Kaplan
George Kaplan
Originally Posted by Magnetoman
Although that would be a year later than I expected when I finished the trailer, this is definitely a case of better late than never.

To put a positive spin on things. Assuming that you were always going to do the Clipper at some point then the actual impact is a change in the order that you are doing things.

Come next spring (assuming that your assumptions are correct) you can use the trailer for its intended purpose and whilst doing so the Clipper can be added to the list of bikes that you could take.

John
1 member likes this
by Hugh Jörgen
Hugh Jörgen
Even more ironically, you can't fit a motorcycle in it now.
MM will drag it over to his Olympic size pool, put it on blocks, throw a few palm fronds over it and it will become the local Tiki bar.
1 member likes this
by Shane in Oz
Shane in Oz
Originally Posted by Magnetoman
So, I'll continue to wear a mask, avoid crowds, and remain cautious as I roam the West with my trailer.
Just like the 1870s smile
1 member likes this
by Cyborg
Cyborg
No desire to derail this thread... after all don’t want to spread myself too thin. The only thing that bugs me is our current inability to produce a vaccine in any sort of volume on our own soil. Won’t get into why, because that is verboten and the software prevents me from expressing myself in a clear and concise manner. There is no excuse for us not to be producing enough to vaccinate ourselves and a large volume of the folks in countries that can’t afford it.
1 member likes this
by Tridentman
Tridentman
Tom-- I am sure that I am speaking for both MMan and myself---the sentiments that we are expressing about having two vaccine shots is primarily one of relief that in all probability we will not now get the the virus and that if we do then the effects will not be serious and certainly not fatal.
Alongside that there is a recognition that none of us will be able to feel "free" in the way we were in 2019 until the vast majority of the worlds population have been vaccinated.
So---I hope that you guys in Canada (and UK, Oz, NZ, Uganda, Germany etc etc) get vaccinated quickly.
1 member likes this
by NYBSAGUY
NYBSAGUY
Originally Posted by Magnetoman
The wiring is messier than I would like,.


There is a reason plumbers work on plumbing. Electricians have no such constraints. Nor do their loftier colleagues, electrical engineers.
1 member likes this
by Magnetoman
Magnetoman
As a reminder, I have LED panels over the workbench and at the back of the trailer that I scientifically position to provide bright, uniform, illumination from front to back when both are on. However, I gave each of them their own switch so only one need be on if, say, I'm only working at the workbench.

Messy wiring or not, the meter already has earned its keep. Either of the two LED panels alone draws ~37 W and pulls the voltage of the freshly-charged battery down to ~11.35 V. However, together they draw ~85 W (i.e. somewhat more than twice as much as either one alone) and pull the voltage down to ~9.3 V. A useful fact I learned from this is that even at 9.17 V both panels remain bright.

As the meter shows, after 4.0 hours with just one panel on, 161 W-hr of the battery's life force has been sucked from it, but the voltage has barely dropped.

[Linked Image]

The battery is a deep-discharge marine battery that does triple-duty powering the DocZ, the trailer's break-away brakes, and the inside of the trailer, and has a claimed capacity of 120 A-hr. That nominally means it could supply 1 A for 120 hrs, or 120 amp for 1 hr. but it actually only sort of means that. But, using the 120 A-hr at face value is good for making an estimate which, along with the measured current draw of 3.32 A, says it could keep the light on for 36 hours. Looked at another way, in 4.0 hours the LED panel used 161 W-hr of energy to keep the light on, so in 36 hours it would use 36/4×161 = 1449 W-hr. Within the validity of these estimates, that is consistent with a 120 A-hr. rating at 11.9 V.

Anyway, thanks to the meter I now know it's best to use only one light at a time, and that I could pull an all-nighter rebuilding the top end of an Ariel on the side of the road in Death Valley without having to light a candle to see where I dropped the valve spring. However, you would be right in thinking that I'm unlikely to work for 36 hours on the side of the road in Death Valley, so this battery might seem like overkill.

The battery has other purposes in addition to providing light. I calculate that it can provide a half-dozen 5-second starts of a bike on the DocZ. Five seconds might not sound like much, but if a bike won't start after being turned over for even half that long it has some problem that needs to be resolved before continuing on the DocZ. Five starts would still leave enough energy in the battery to power an LED panel for 6 hours. There's also a battery-powered tire pump, and battery-powered fans over the workbench.

Thanks to the meter I learned what I needed to know after 4 hours, so I aborted the experiment at that point rather than let it run for 36. I reset the meter to 0 and put the battery on the charger.
Attached Images
1 member likes this
by Magnetoman
Magnetoman
Much as I hate to admit it, until today my trailer lacked a full instrumentation package. However, thanks to an $8.50 meter I'll now know exactly when the lights will go out.

[Linked Image]

The wiring is messier than I would like, but that's a consequence of me wanting the meter and shunt in that location.

The meter measures current up to 50 A by means of the shunt resistor mounted below it, multiplies I×V to display the instantaneous power draw (in this case, from one of the two overhead LED light panels), and integrates that value over time to give the total energy that has been supplied by the battery up to that point (0 in the photograph, because the light had been on less than the ~40 sec. needed to register 1 W-hr.).

The energy reading is the important one for knowing when work for the night will cease because what matters is the total energy the battery can supply before the voltage drops below the threshold to keep the LEDs flickering. If the battery is good for ~100 A-hr, that's ~1000 W-hr., so the resolution of 1 unit on the energy display is good. Once I've calibrated the energy that the battery can supply, glancing at the meter will tell me how much faster I have to work.
Attached Images
1 member likes this
by Magnetoman
Magnetoman
Originally Posted by Magnetoman
The Irish Rally returns to the same hotel every night, where daily maintenance and repairs are done on the asphalt of the car park (on hands and knees, after dark, in the rain...).
For the record, offline an Irishman, who shall remain nameless, claimed this was a slight mis-statement on my part, given that every year the Rally provides participants with a covered space for serious repairs, with power, lights, power tools, vise, welder, etc. However, other than such details, his objection is baseless...
1 member likes this
by Magnetoman
Magnetoman
Originally Posted by Hugh Jörgen
all future vehicles will not be propelled by ICE's.
For what it's worth, listen to what this guy predicts starting at 1:12 into the following video:

1 member likes this
by Magnetoman
Magnetoman
Originally Posted by George Kaplan
I am not a big coffee fan but do drink it occasionally. The worst cup of coffee that I have ever had was ... in a dreaded Starbucks ...
Digressions into topics not nearly as fraught as global warming and electric vehicles should be fine, but I fear we still could be in dangerous territory with Englishmen commenting on coffee and Americans on tea.

First, I won't comment on tea because whatever opinions on it that I might offer would be worthless. The only time I drink it is if I'm sick with a cold and sore throat so can't taste it anyway. However, I will cross swords with Mr. Kaplan on coffee. Starbucks has my eternal gratitude for single-handedly raising the acceptable standards in many shops from the tasteless, semi-transparent brew once universally served in diners across the U.S. and England. In pre-Starbucks days, Germany and Japan had by far the highest national standards for "standard" coffee (as opposed to espresso). Someone used to those national standards would find Starbucks coffee somewhat weak, but someone raised on American or English diner standards for coffee would find it much too strong.

To throw down the gauntlet, the worst coffee I've ever had at a Starbucks in the U.S. was better by far than the best coffee I've ever had at a non-Starbucks in England (that said, German and Japanese coffee is better). So, put that in your teapot and smoke it, Mr. Kaplan.
1 member likes this
by NYBSAGUY
NYBSAGUY
Just to add some caffeine to the flames, I used to have my office in Soho in London, and underneath was a little place called the Soho Cafe. When I went down for my morning coffee, the ancient crone working the floor would spot me and immediately shout, "A cup o' chino for our Paddy friend!" Even though Soho in London is historically an Italian enclave, cappuccino had been translated into Cockney for the benefit of the visitors

I have never liked German coffee, and I even experimented by going out with a German girl to see if the coffee would taste better. It didn't. French and Italian coffee, however, was consistently excellent. The French invented the French Press, after all.

MMan has traveled extensively with me in Europe and he seems to have forgotten that the coffee in Spain is also exceptionally good. If you can work through the many variations of espresso typically on offer (corto de cafe, cortado, con leche, etc etc) you always end up with a good, strong shot of delicious Joe.
1 member likes this
by Tridentman
Tridentman
Growing up in England in the immediate post war years coffee was not available--you drank tea or water.
I guess i must have been about 15 when I had my first cup of coffee and, typically of UK at that time--it was instant coffee.
I guess taste is a very personal matter---undoubtedly conditioned by experience --but I have never taken to Starbucks coffee.
However working in the Middle East in the 1970s I did develop a taste for Turkish coffee--certainly clears the palate!
1 member likes this
by George Kaplan
George Kaplan
Originally Posted by Magnetoman
However, I will cross swords with Mr. Kaplan on coffee. Starbucks has my eternal gratitude for single-handedly raising the acceptable standards ................
I do have to agree with you that the commercial success of Starbucks started the coffee shop wars that has culminated in decent coffee availability throughout the western world.

Originally Posted by Magnetoman
To throw down the gauntlet, the worst coffee I've ever had at a Starbucks in the U.S. was better by far than the best coffee I've ever had at a non-Starbucks in England (that said, German and Japanese coffee is better). So, put that in your teapot and smoke it, Mr. Kaplan.
I stand by my comments about the worst cup of coffee and tea I have ever had because it is factually correct. However, challenge accepted. If you are ever in my Manor (if we are ever allowed out again!) then will take you to an independent English coffee house that will serve some of the best coffee that you have ever had.

John
1 member likes this
by George Kaplan
George Kaplan
Originally Posted by Magnetoman
the English wife of one couple said the Twinnings-brand tea sold in the U.S. is significantly different than that sold in England
Originally Posted by Magnetoman
I'm not a fan of tea so you might independently confirm or refute this

I am a big fan of tea and on the numerous trips I have made to the USA I have never had a cup of tea that was even anywhere near acceptable so I imagine that your English dinner party guest is correct.

I am not a big coffee fan but do drink it occasionally. The worst cup of coffee that I have ever had was in the USA which is ironic for a country that loves coffee. It was in a dreaded Starbucks somewhere between Sanibel and St Petersburg. You have to give it to Starbucks for being consistent though because the worst cup of tea I have ever had (excluding vending machines) was in a Starbucks in York, England.


John
1 member likes this
by Tridentman
Tridentman
Classic marketing ploy---surround it with bulls**t and then you can charge more for it.
Just my cynical old self with my two cents worth!
1 member likes this
by Magnetoman
Magnetoman
Originally Posted by GrandPaul
Good ol' Folgers for coffee.
In pre-Starbucks days we ground our own coffee at home, and I had a coffee maker in my outer office on campus. Since grinding coffee there wasn't a good option I once ran a test of all the brands of coffee sold by the can in the supermarket. For what it's worth, I still remember that I decided Yuban was the best of them. I'm not saying I thought it tasted great, but it gave me the caffeine I needed. However, that coffee maker only gathered dust after Starbucks and its competitors appeared in the early 1990s.

At one point there were six coffee shops within a short walk from my office, with four of them making up a square on opposite sides of the street and five of the six no more than 50 ft. from any of the others. Anyway, twice a day for ~30 years I got my coffee and my exercise by walking to those shops.

All coffee isn't equal, with mass-market brands relying on the less expensive Robusta bean, while specialty shops use various blends of the more expensive Arabica variety. I take my coffee seriously, as evidenced by the following three photographs that show a master coffee maker in Riyad making a cup specifically for me, starting by roasting the Arabica beans.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Some coffee houses advertise they roast their own coffee, but not too many roast it individually for each customer.
Attached Images
1 member likes this
by Shane in Oz
Shane in Oz
Nice limerick, but the last line doesn't scan properly. "But the aroma was quite a failure" might work better. even though it still has a syllable too many.
1 member likes this
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