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#895754 11/18/22 5:51 pm
Joined: Aug 2011
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We have a 67 Rickman Metisse (with Tri 650 engine) in for repairs, and have discovered the frame is rusty inside. The rust has been in suspension in the oil, and we are going to have to strip the engine, to clean the crank sludge trap, whist replacing all the bearings.
Does anyone have a positive way of removing the rust, taking into consideration the inaccessibility of getting inside the frame? When built, they drilled (nominally) 1/2" holes in the frame tubes (inlet & outlet) before welding the 'bungs' on for the filler plug/outlet --- so there's absolutely NO WAY of getting inside to physically 'agitate' the rust. We have to get this problem addressed ASAP, so the job can go forward.
Any help gratefully accepted,
Brid (West Coast Racing)

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Electrolysis , used it for several petrol tanks and one oil frame. Works great. I use a washing soda solution as an electrolite. Set up a heavy duty car battery. Set up a pos and neg electrical connection with some crocodile clips , install an in-line 10amp fuse in one side for piece of mind.
Use a bit of flat steel bar , about 1/4" x 1" as long as possible to dangle into the frame cavity. I made a wooden collar for the flat bar so I could jam it into the frame filler hole and keep it isolated.
Connect frame to neg side.
Set up flat bar and test between frame and flat bar with a multi-meter to make sure there's no continuity before making final connection to battery.
Remove and clean flat bar every few hours, but can be left overnight when you need to.
Keep running for about 24 hrs and then change for fresh electrolite solution.
Run for another 24 hours , or as long as it takes.
Flush out , dry out and rinse with an oil solution.
Works great and you'll be amazed at what comes out.
I used an endoscope for interim and final inspection to see if it was clean enough.
Plenty of info on Google about the process.

Last edited by KevRasen; 11/18/22 7:08 pm.
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Another possibility.

Shot an email to HWC Jetters describing the issue.
They responded "One thing I can think of would be a Trap Kit 1/8"x50' Jetter hose w/nozzle. The nozzle would normally be a lazer nozzle which is one forward jet and 3 back jets. But we could put a rotating nozzle on it."
https://hwcjetters.com/


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I would think either electrolysis or phosphoric acid. I have had good results using phosphoric acid treatment as marketed (at least in the past) by Yamaha for fuel tanks. I don't see why this would be different. However you go, best of luck and please update us. Hope this helps.\

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Evaporust.

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I use both electrolysis and chelation products (Evaporust, Rust911) and both methods work well. Electrolysis will remove or at least separate everything that is not iron based - this includes paint and plating. The chelation products only attack rust.
Items de-rusted with electrolysis seem to re-rust quicker than using Evaporust, but that only matters if like me you're really slow & don't paint or otherwise treat them quick enough to prevent it.
When washing after either treatment brushing or rubbing removes a layer of fine residue, so getting a pressure washer wand inside might be a good idea if you can't reach it otherwise.


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