Britbike forum

Classic British SparesKlempf British PartsBaxter CycleThe Bonneville ShopLowbrow CustomsGirling Classic MotorcycleLucas Classic MotorcycleHepolite PistonsIndustrial tec supplyJob Cycle

Upgrade your membership to Premium Membership or Gold Membership or even Benefactor


New Sponsor post
10% Off Girling at The Bonneville Shop 2/3-2/9/23
by The Bonneville Shop - 02/03/23 6:14 pm
New FAQ post
News & Announcements
Premium members! 🌟
by Morgan aka admin - 02/04/23 2:40 pm
Buy BritBike staff a coffee ☕️ or pint 🍺
by Morgan aka admin - 01/15/23 9:29 am
Benefactor ✅
by Morgan aka admin - 01/08/23 8:38 pm
How to guides - Technical articles
ShoutChat
Comment Guidelines: Do post respectful and insightful comments. Don't flame, hate, spam.
Member Spotlight
Denis J
Denis J
Sacramento, CA
Posts: 485
Joined: November 2012
Top Posters(30 Days)
Lannis 84
DavidP 83
Top Likes Received (30 Days)
Kev. 34
DavidP 27
Newest Members
Uneasy Rider, Mally, Daveed, 70Triumph, Knight57Corv
12,392 Registered Users
Forum Statistics
Forums35
Topics76,551
Posts784,409
Members12,392
Most Online204
Jul 10th, 2022
Random Gallery photo
Photo posting tutorial

Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 2,604
Likes: 1
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 2,604
Likes: 1
I do chat to my dad about his doctor’s practice which was for thirty years on the Golden Hillock Road from the late 60s to the late 90s. .

Amongst his many unusual jobs, he mentioned to me that he’d cover for the Small Heath factory doctor for BSA/NVT when he was on leave. He said the factory doctor’s office was very well equipped and even had decorative wooden panelling. I asked what industrial injuries he had to deal with. However , there were none: he was instead writing out sick notes for workers too hung over to safely operate machinery !


1983 TR65T Tiger Trail
1983 TSSAV
1983 TSX
1983 TR65 Thunderbird
1982 TR7T Tiger Trail
British motorcycles on eBay
Joined: Oct 2003
Posts: 4,438
Likes: 30
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2003
Posts: 4,438
Likes: 30
Hard to get sick notes these days. I think they are now called fit notes!

What a fabulous place the BSA factory must have been! The Ford plant at Dagenham was enormous , too. I was impressed that they had their own blast furnace to make steel. Iron ore in one end and Cortinas out the other.

Dave

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 6,334
Likes: 658
Life Member
Online Content
Life Member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 6,334
Likes: 658
Originally Posted by dave j
Hard to get sick notes these days. I think they are now called fit notes!

What a fabulous place the BSA factory must have been! The Ford plant at Dagenham was enormous , too. I was impressed that they had their own blast furnace to make steel. Iron ore in one end and Cortinas out the other.

Dave

Cortinas and Anglias were two of my favorites.


Gordon Gray in NC, USA........White man broke the code

Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 2,329
Likes: 422
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 2,329
Likes: 422
I wondered why you are a Triumph fan when you father had his practice near the BSA factory.

Originally Posted by meriden4ever
he was instead writing out sick notes for workers too hung over to safely operate machinery !
That might explain it...

Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 8,155
Likes: 354
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 8,155
Likes: 354
Originally Posted by Shane in Oz
I wondered why you are a Triumph fan when you father had his practice near the BSA factory.
Maybe he got a few glimpses of the shop floor and all that WW1 era machinery?


"Gosh, it's not a 1/4 20, must be metric."

72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"

Joined: Apr 2015
Posts: 1,631
Likes: 81
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Apr 2015
Posts: 1,631
Likes: 81
In my experience, many fabrication workshop workers and construction workers were "under the influence of alcohol" at work during the 1970s and 1980s. Three or four pints of session beer at lunchtime wasn't that unusual.

Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,178
Likes: 114
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,178
Likes: 114
I worked in utility construction (sewer lines, water lines, plants, etc.) in the 70-80s. Most of the labor was either Spanish or Portuguese.They all drank wine or beer at lunch. And not small amounts either.

Ed from NJ

Joined: Apr 2011
Posts: 102
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Apr 2011
Posts: 102
In the early 70’s, I worked summers and evenings over several years at Continental Can Corporation in Paterson, NJ, while also attending college. The plant produced hundreds of thousands of beverage and food cans every shift. It was an era when bars were practically on every block around industrial and manufacturing areas, some offering free lunch if drinks were ordered.

A group of workers in the factory did not need to have alcohol, before, during, or after work. A few of the unfortunates worked in the upper-level spray coating and oven baking section, where the inner parts of cans were sprayed with lacquer, which was then baked off at high temperature. A few minutes in the section and one got a buzz, followed by a hangover later. I felt sorry for the regular shift workers in the section, because they walked around like zombies all the time. The fume exposure was considered normal, but the plant did have an around-the-clock medical office to treat the cuts and bruises gotten from razor sharp sheet steel and stamping equipment.

Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 6,338
Likes: 629
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 6,338
Likes: 629
In the 60s I worked for a large engineering company in Coventry UK.
Everybody was paid weekly at Thursday lunchtime.
Thursday evening everyone went to the pub.
The hangovers were not due to lunchtime drinking but Thursday evening drinking.
Thursday evening you would go out at 6 p.m. and drink until closing time at 11.
It was normally reckoned that you drank 3 pints an hour.
And these are Imperial pints (20 fl.oz) not US pints (16 fl.oz).
And normally strong English bitter beer.
15 pints in an evening.
The morning after (Friday) lots of guys were still drunk and the quality of work done was very poor.
The big car companies in Coventry (Jaguar, Morris, Triumph etc) had a special warranty category which was "Friday morning car" where parts were missing, not assembled properly etc etc.
Sounds horrendous by todays standards but--- let me tell you--- it was great fun!

1 member likes this: ricochetrider
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,132
Likes: 37
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,132
Likes: 37
Fridays were POETS day.

I worked as a theatre tech and in the 70’s about the only place to get a decent lunch/ dinner was in a pub.
Lunch was a couple of pints, dinner was 6-7 normally and 3 pints.
Then back to work at height or shift reasonably heavy objects.
If you were on a follow spot you’d get a couple of pints ordered for the interval to get your fluids up.

Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 4,525
Likes: 165
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 4,525
Likes: 165
15 pints a day!!! that's a lot of wobble-pop and not that fairy-pee 'lite' stuff either i bet the your-a-nary systems of those chaps got a serious workout no enlarged prostates need apply!


1972 Triumph T120
1968 BSA A65
1968 MGB Roadster
1979 Chevrolet Camaro Berlinetta
1969 Honda Mini Trail
2004 Honda Shadow Aero
1949 Ferguson TE20 tractor
1975 yamaha xs650b
1971 SL 175 Honda project
2 olive drab WWII military bicycle replicas
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,481
Likes: 430
Member
Online Content
Member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,481
Likes: 430
Pints? Tyros.
We did yards.


Against stupidity
the gods themselves
contend in vain.
― Frederich Schiller
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 2,409
Likes: 450
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 2,409
Likes: 450
It wasn't unique to the UK.
The best improvement in reliability for the Ferrari race cars was stopping the
crews from hitting the vino at lunch time.

Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 2,329
Likes: 422
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 2,329
Likes: 422
Originally Posted by Hugh Jörgen
Pints? Tyros.
We did yards.
Yes, but we all know about American beers.

Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,981
Likes: 230
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,981
Likes: 230
I know all too well about American "big name" commercially-produced beers.
You might do better just ordering a pint of WATER. It's free, and with about the same effect as the big "brand-name" stuff.

It's German, Czech, Belgian or Polish beers for me, and British dark porters and ales.

(American local-brewed "craft beers" are generally good, though.)

"I'm IRISH, of course I'll have a beer! It's expected of me!"

Joined: May 2007
Posts: 11,738
Likes: 254
Moto Mojo
Offline
Moto Mojo
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 11,738
Likes: 254
Ah, the "good ol days" of alcohol (and drugs) at work, eh?

My 2 careers have been in construction & entertainment. Back in the 70s & 80s, on commercial construction sites, had anyone inplemented drug testing, a large portion of the work force would've been suddenly missing.

Things have changed in construction now with insurance companies demanding less risk of their insured, but entertainment flies largely under the radar. I think at least some of that is because we technically are W2 employees- but "outside" employees not subject to corporate rules of order & we dont reap any benefits that "regular" employees get. We are working under a contractual labor agreement- paid directly via whatever organization owns or operates/manages each venue- so nobody really has their eyes on us. That said OSHA has spent some years studying our industry and now there's an entertainment-specific OSHA 10 course.


Lesya Ukrainka:
“He who has not lived through a storm/does not know the price of strength.”

Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 3,745
Likes: 293
Life member
Offline
Life member
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 3,745
Likes: 293
Originally Posted by Irish Swede
I know all too well about American "big name" commercially-produced beers.
You might do better just ordering a pint of WATER. It's free, and with about the same effect as the big "brand-name" stuff.

It's German, Czech, Belgian or Polish beers for me, and British dark porters and ales.

(American local-brewed "craft beers" are generally good, though.)

"I'm IRISH, of course I'll have a beer! It's expected of me!"


During my travels I developed a liking for this
[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]
so much that some survived the home with me, stashed in the riding gear bag!
[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]

And then Rich B gave me a taster of this plus other nice things he had in his bag of goodies :)_
[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]

And there was this at the home of Tom aka RichochetRider and the delightful Miss C.
[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]

However, long time ago while working overseas I did get some stuff resembling nanny goat piss at various US outposts. Best forgotten about frown


BeezaBryan

He knows not where he's going, For the ocean will decide,
Its not the destination, It's the glory of the ride (Edward Monkton, Zen Dog)





Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,981
Likes: 230
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,981
Likes: 230
Yuengling products haven't reached Illinois, but I was introduced to them at the AMCA meet in Wauseon, Ohio about 15 years ago.

They are TOP QUALITY beers.

If they ever get as far west as Illinois, I'll be a customer!

Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,132
Likes: 37
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,132
Likes: 37
When I started drinking UK pub hours were
10.30 am to 2.30, 5.30 to 10.30 M-S. with 11.00 on Friday and Saturday nights
12 to 2.00 and 7-10.30 on Sundays

They were from WW1 to ensure that Arms manufacturers had relatively sober workers who tended to blow themselves up while pissed.
The rules only changed in the late 80’s, maybe early 90’s.

Pre changes, remember that a few places still had 10.30 closing on Fridays and Saturdays, while a pub 100 yds down the road in a different licence area were open to 11. There was a stampede at 10.45 to get down the road for a last pint.

Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 6,338
Likes: 629
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 6,338
Likes: 629
Certainly in the 60s there were also variations from shire to shire.
For example I lived in warwickshire but just by the border with Northamptonshire.
In the week Warwickshires closing time was 10.30 p.m. but Northamptonshires was 11.00 p.m.
So at about 10 p.m. we would ride a few miles down the road into Northamptonshire and drink until 11 p.m.!
And remember -- in those days no helmets!
And then at 11.10 p.m. (because they always allowed 10 minutes of drinking up time) it was on the bikes and back to a fish and chip shop in Warwickshire!
And of course sometimes with a good crowd in the pub the pub landlord would lock the doors at closing time.
If you happened to be inside then the pub became a private party and the licensing hours did not apply!
Happy Daze!

Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 8,155
Likes: 354
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 8,155
Likes: 354
The only place I worked with a drinking problem was when I was a stage hand. We would go out on lunch break and knock down a 12 pack or two.
I always thought that if I had a break truck selling nothing but beer, cigarettes and breath mints I could retire in a year. laughing
Most every other place I worked you had only 1/2 hour break, ate your sandwich in the break room, had a smoke and went back to work.
At one place I worked in the late 80s rumor had it that they were going to start drug testing. I think the company realized that they would lose some of their best employees (including me) and their entire maintenance crew. They settled for testing new hires.


"Gosh, it's not a 1/4 20, must be metric."

72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"

Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,481
Likes: 430
Member
Online Content
Member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,481
Likes: 430
We had 30 minutes as well.
Ernie would have 2 trays of draught waiting.
The reason you salt beer is to neutralize the carbonation.
Then you open your throat and pour...


Against stupidity
the gods themselves
contend in vain.
― Frederich Schiller
Joined: Apr 2015
Posts: 1,631
Likes: 81
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Apr 2015
Posts: 1,631
Likes: 81
Put salt in beer?! Surely salt is for chips?

Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 4,525
Likes: 165
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 4,525
Likes: 165
i been swigging the YingaLing Oktoberfest stuff it's really tasty 3 or 4 of them and i am 'relaxed'


1972 Triumph T120
1968 BSA A65
1968 MGB Roadster
1979 Chevrolet Camaro Berlinetta
1969 Honda Mini Trail
2004 Honda Shadow Aero
1949 Ferguson TE20 tractor
1975 yamaha xs650b
1971 SL 175 Honda project
2 olive drab WWII military bicycle replicas
1 member likes this: BeezaBryan
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 8,155
Likes: 354
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 8,155
Likes: 354
Originally Posted by raf940
i been swigging the YingaLing Oktoberfest stuff it's really tasty 3 or 4 of them and i am 'relaxed'
Good beer if you can find it. I like their Porter, but must settle for the Black & Tan. I'll never understand their distribution strategy, six packs of tall cans sell for less than six packs of bottles. The cans don't taste quite as good, but I always pour them into a glass.
The only Yuegling I didn't like was a Chocolate Porter, too sweet.


"Gosh, it's not a 1/4 20, must be metric."

72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"

Page 1 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  bill50cal 

Link Copied to Clipboard
British Cycle SupplyMorries PlaceKlempf British PartsBSA Unit SinglesPodtronicVintage MagazineBritBike SponsorBritish Tools & FastenersBritBike Sponsor






© 1996-2023 britbike.com
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5