Britbike forum

Classic British SparesKlempf British PartsBaxter CycleThe Bonneville ShopLowbrow CustomsGirling Classic MotorcycleLucas Classic MotorcycleHepolite PistonsIndustrial tec supplyJob Cycle

Upgrade your membership to Premium Membership or Gold Membership or even Benefactor


New Sponsor post
10% Off Girling at The Bonneville Shop 2/3-2/9/23
by The Bonneville Shop - 02/03/23 6:14 pm
New FAQ post
News & Announcements
Premium members! 🌟
by Morgan aka admin - 02/04/23 2:40 pm
Buy BritBike staff a coffee ☕️ or pint 🍺
by Morgan aka admin - 01/15/23 9:29 am
Benefactor ✅
by Morgan aka admin - 01/08/23 8:38 pm
How to guides - Technical articles
ShoutChat
Comment Guidelines: Do post respectful and insightful comments. Don't flame, hate, spam.
Member Spotlight
Denis J
Denis J
Sacramento, CA
Posts: 485
Joined: November 2012
Top Posters(30 Days)
Lannis 84
DavidP 83
Top Likes Received (30 Days)
Kev. 34
DavidP 27
Newest Members
Uneasy Rider, Mally, Daveed, 70Triumph, Knight57Corv
12,392 Registered Users
Forum Statistics
Forums35
Topics76,551
Posts784,416
Members12,392
Most Online204
Jul 10th, 2022
Random Gallery photo
Photo posting tutorial

Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 97
Likes: 2
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 97
Likes: 2
Hey All... Sorry for trying to be so provocative with my title.

I was looking back through my posts and realized it's been 13 years, 2 houses, 7 cars, 6 motorcycles and a kid, since I last posted on this forum. My last post was actually a "for sale" thread when I released my 1965 Bonneville into the wild. Prior to that, I restored a 1964 T120R with Don Hutchinson, finishing the project in 2006 -- more on that bike in another thread. Anyway, I just acquired another '64 Bonnie from a collection of restored bikes that is currently being liquidated, so I'm officially back into the fold. This is where the warning part comes into the story.

When I purchased this new to me '64, I bought it with the understanding that this bike had been restored to be displayed, not ridden. It had been done to a high standard by a noted restorer; which it was, so that's not a problem. It's actually an incredibly correct bike, minus a few items that I would have done a bit differently. I started into the process of getting this beauty on the road by thinking about what it may take to "commission" a bike that had never had a drop of fluid in any reservoir for the purpose of providing a functioning motorcycle -- gas tank, oil tank, trans, primary, forks... etc. Those were dutifully filled with the proper weights and measures. Some minor leaks were discovered, but once all the fittings were nipped up, that was remedied. So here's what you shouldn't do.... make assumptions about anything you have not checked carefully. Don't assume the bolts are tight on important components that keep the bike safe to ride. Don't assume the valves are adjusted even though there is good compression. Don't assume the wiring was done correctly or that there is a consistency in the conversion to 12 from 6 volts. More importantly, don't ever assume that critical components for the ignition system was set up and wired carefully. Long story short, the Boyer electronic ignition was never actually assembled in the correct orientation wrt timing marks and the wiring was incorrect. This led to a very bad situation vis being highly advanced (running super hot) followed by a lot of head scratching to understand what might be happening. Check Everything TWICE before you kick that motor over or you could find yourself spending a lot of time and a fair bit of money fixing a silly oversight.

Anyway, this was a long way of saying I am glad to be back to British, as it were. I look forward to getting ideas and helping others where I can on this forum.

Cheers,
Dan in MD

[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

Last edited by Dan Blair; 08/25/22 3:27 pm.
2 members like this: rory brennan, slofut
Triumphs on eBay
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,602
Likes: 86
Parts Dealer
Offline
Parts Dealer
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,602
Likes: 86
I have found when purchasing a restored bike not to be fooled by the way it "looks"

You would be surprised of how many restored bikes are lemons and built only for display..

Glad you got a good one

1 member likes this: NickL
Joined: Oct 2014
Posts: 317
Likes: 51
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2014
Posts: 317
Likes: 51
Beautiful bike Dan, 64 is a favorite year of mine, and welcome back to the forum!


1966 Triumph T120TT project
1967 Triumph TR6C
1972 Triumph TR6R
2017 Triumph Street Scrambler
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 1,499
Likes: 37
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 1,499
Likes: 37
That's a beautiful looking bike.


If anything other than a blank space is visible here, something's wrong.
Joined: Nov 2002
Posts: 927
Likes: 25
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2002
Posts: 927
Likes: 25
I would err on the side of caution and strip the engine to check the crank and rods then work my way out from there.


1958 5TA / T100
1967 T120R
1969 TR6C
1970 TR6C
1 member likes this: tridentt150v
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 409
Likes: 18
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 409
Likes: 18
Triumph guy Jon Berglund showed me a motor he was working on, bike was pristine show quality recently bought from a prestigious museum. Fresh rebuilt motor locked up shortly after purchase, he had oil analyzed to find glass beads in the oil.

Last edited by slofut; 08/26/22 5:51 pm.

'68 Bonnie, '70 TR6r
'74 CL360
trail 70's and minitrails
1 member likes this: NickL
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 104
Likes: 4
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 104
Likes: 4
We had the same problem with a second hand steam turbine we had installed. They hadn't cleaned out all the passages correctly, so when oil started circulating around, it picked up the beads. They can block up critical holes very quickly. The glass is very good at gouging journal surfaces. Damage rolling element bearings effectively as well.
Moral of the story, bead blasting is great, but be ultra cautious when cleaning up afterwards. There are just so many potential hideouts.


68TR6P rebuilt as a C
70 TR6R
73 TR5T
Joined: Aug 2019
Posts: 38
Likes: 1
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Aug 2019
Posts: 38
Likes: 1
I had a 74 XLCH someone routed the oil lines backwards on. It ran, but man it needed some work after he demo'd it to me.

Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 8,133
Likes: 129
Born To Run
Offline
Born To Run
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 8,133
Likes: 129
Welcome back Dan!

I'm in SE Carroll County. We should go for a ride out in Frederick/Washington counties sometime. Great roads up there.

Cheers,

Steve


'77 T140J Silver Jubilee
'82 T140LE TMA Royal
‘69 BSA Rocket 3 (patiently awaiting it's turn)
"Vintage Bike". What's in your garage?

"The paying customer is always right."

Fitting round pegs into square holes since 1961...
Joined: Oct 2003
Posts: 4,438
Likes: 30
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2003
Posts: 4,438
Likes: 30
Dan- If you bought the bike on the understanding that it was restored to be displayed and not ridden then you would know that it was bound to require work. It certainly is a very nice looking bike.

My bike looked awful and was awful but after I got it how I wanted it it has been fine for a long time.

Dave

Joined: Sep 2001
Posts: 1,491
Likes: 54
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Sep 2001
Posts: 1,491
Likes: 54
My axiom....If you want the job done right....do it yourself!!!!


Moderated by  John Healy 

Link Copied to Clipboard
British Cycle SupplyMorries PlaceKlempf British PartsBSA Unit SinglesPodtronicVintage MagazineBritBike SponsorBritish Tools & FastenersBritBike Sponsor






© 1996-2023 britbike.com
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5