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Originally Posted by hardarser
Hah! that's not a microburst, it's rattler piss.
Oh dear, I hope not…

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We had wind and 0.1" of rain last night, but not at the same time. So, it was a test, but not a good test, of whether my additional work to microburst-proof the booth succeeded. No liquid of any kind was on the floor when I checked this morning.

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It was 96 ℉ in full sunlight just after 12:00 noon yesterday when I measured the inside temperature to be ~74 ℉.

[Linked Image]

If the insulation on the shed and on the inlet/outlet hoses of the A/C unit were perfect, the temperature of the outside metal skin of the shed wouldn't matter, and what would determine the temperature would be the amount by which the compressor and radiator inside the A/C unit could reduce the temperature of the outside air. That is, the temperature of the outside air would determine the temperature of the inside of the shed.

If the insulation isn't perfect, which it isn't, some of the heat from the 150+ ℉ outside skin will enter the shed and add to the load on the A/C unit, increasing the temperature over that which it would have had with perfect insulation. The walls feel cool so I believe the inside temperature is mostly determined by that of the outside air, not the hot skin, which means I can expect the A/C unit to drop the temperature by ~22 ℉ with respect to that of the outside air whether it is sunny or cloudy.

Basically, this means that the A/C will cool the inside enough to work even on the hottest days of the year, as long as I paint before lunchtime. If I insist on painting during mid-afternoon, that will be possible 85% of the year if I don't want to work when it's warmer than 82 ℉ (the record hottest year had 57 days at or above 105 ℉; the booth would be at 83 ℉ on a 105-degree day).

After measuring the temperature, I turned off the A/C, left one of the doors open, and used the fan for about three hours to be sure everything inside was bone dry.

[Linked Image]

When I finally finished what I was doing and came back to the booth, I turned off the fan and laid newspaper on the floor to serve as a tell-tale if any of it is touched by moisture during the next rain.

[Linked Image]

Overnight we had 0.2", although I don't know if it was windy, with no sign of water on the newspapers.

The next photograph shows the front of the paint shed.

[Linked Image]

It would be a lot easier to make water-tight if it didn't have doors...

If you look closely, at the top and bottom of the doors are clamps that press the doors against seals. The silver tape is Nashua 324A, 4.8 mil Al backed by adhesive rated to 325 ℉. Some of the strips of that tape are sealing seams that are already sealed with RTV (belt and braces), however some of it is serving as a UV shield over Gorilla 'All Weather Waterproof Duct Tape', sold for outdoor use and rated to 200 ℉, as well as over the rubber weatherstripping that seals the seam between the two doors. The Gorilla tape says it's "UV resistant" but Al definitely is so, again, belt and braces.

The cement blocks in front are where I'll remove my shoes, then step inside into disposable shoe covers, leaving my shoes outdoors for scorpions to crawl into while I'm painting. I haven't decided yet whether to cover the blocks with a vinyl mat, or if that would just provide yet another habitat for unwanted critters.

A question that I hope someone has an answer to is, how should I clean the inside walls and ceiling? Cutting the insulation pieces produced a fine dust that I had to wipe from the surfaces to get the sealing tape to stick. However, that was a fairly superficial cleaning, so the walls and ceiling need a thorough cleaning before the booth is ready. If I use wet paper towels, each one would quickly become saturated with insulation dust, leaving as much behind as it picked up. Is there a better way than using hundreds of wet paper towels?

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Originally Posted by Gordon Gray
Will the overspray need to be cleaned up after a round of painting?
Good question. I'll hang a plastic sheet on the wall behind the parts, that will extend under them as well, that should collect most of the overspray. A coarse A/C filter on the outlet will capture most of the paint that tries to escape the booth and, depending on how fast I find that it clogs, I can add a rag in front of it.

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>> how should I clean the inside walls and ceiling?

Large size lint roller?
https://www.amazon.com/Scotch-Brite153-Large-Lint-Roller-Stickier/dp/B07F1VGDGJ


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Originally Posted by Hugh Jörgen
Large size lint roller?
That's an excellent suggestion. Thanks.

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Originally Posted by Gordon Gray
I know you want it spotless…….
I'll do my best to make it spotless inside. But, contrary to expected practice, I'll first paint several invaluable BSA parts before painting anything from a lesser marque like a Vincent. Hopefully, any residual dust that escaped my cleaning that is loose enough for flowing air to knock off the walls, will be knocked off during those initial sessions.

I'm afraid compressed air would just move dust from one place to another, but a lint roller is on order, and wet paper towels will deal with the corners, nooks, and crannies.

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Originally Posted by Cyborg
Something like this or a reasonable facsimile?
That certainly would work, but I'm thinking of just hanging cheap, thin protective plastic covers of the type sold for use when painting inside your house.

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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
I'll first paint several invaluable BSA parts before painting anything from a lesser marque like a Vincent.

laughing Freudian slip?


'77 T140J Silver Jubilee
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‘69 BSA Rocket 3 (patiently awaiting it's turn)
"Vintage Bike". What's in your garage?

"The paying customer is always right."

Fitting round pegs into square holes since 1961...
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Cheapo Depot has 4x8 sheets of 1/16" thick "poly wall" ( plas tex ) panel for $25 a sheet .
( extremely ugly , cheap and sanitary , all at the same time )
it can be glued in place against the foam . ( using the correct adhesive )
... there are inside corner trim pieces ... and butt joint covers ... that can add the extra
Sterile laboratory look

Covering inside walls would be another cost overrun ... and take extra time to install .
But it would seal the inside ,
Is highly cleanable ,
protect against puncture damage to the foam
and provide a degree of Fire Protection

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Originally Posted by quinten
would be another cost overrun
That ship sailed long ago.

It would take two 4x8 pieces to cover the ~5x6 wall against which paint will be sprayed. I'm not sure it would be necessary, but I'll take a look at the material before making a decision. Thanks for the suggestion.

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Last night was the best test yet of the sealing, with 0.6" of rain accompanied by strong winds. However, I had cheated by hanging a tarp over the doors since I'm unsure of the long-term integrity of all the seals, gaskets, and weatherstripping. Since the booth will be abandoned for long periods when I don't need to paint, if water did manage to enter it could sit festering for several months. Other than the doors, none of the other seams on the booth "should" leak water as-built but, to be sure dust and tiny insects couldn't enter, I sealed them with RTV, and then covered the RTV with aluminum tape.

I've been slowly drafting a post that will describe in detail all the tools in the toolkit, but haven't worked on it for a while. Unfortunately, when I decided to make a few measurements on the tools for that draft, I discovered disaster had struck the garage; all the OEM Vincent tools for the tool kit have disappeared. I spent at least a half-hour searching for them over the course of the day, but kudos to me for doing such an excellent job hiding them. It's not like I'm trying to find a misplaced screwdriver or socket, it's the entire collection of roughly 20 tools that's missing. You would (incorrectly) think that would be pretty hard to hide. I hate it when things like this happen.

The new welding helmet I mentioned a few days ago was delivery today. I took a selfie so you would recognize me, which means you don't have any excuse not to say 'hi' if you see me somewhere.

[Linked Image]

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Luke, I am your father.

Where were you when you took this picture?
https://www.britbike.com/forums/ubb...50-black-shadow-total-rebuild#Post874419


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Originally Posted by Hugh Jörgen
Where were you when you took this picture?
in the garage.

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You were looking for K17.
They are in your office.


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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
......I discovered disaster had struck the garage; all the OEM Vincent tools for the tool kit have disappeared. I spent at least a half-hour searching for them over the course of the day..........
I hate it when that happens. You have my sympathy.

Recently, I wanted to give some attention to one of MY stalled out projects but both nice fork sliders I knew I had couldn't be found. All I could find were mismatched and really ugly ones. That launched me on the project of un-brazing the fender tab from a mutilated slider and silver soldering that tab to a suitable NOS slider I had. The result was satisfactory and I learned more about what can be done if you really think you need to.

Months later, I found the "lost" sliders in the bottom of my solvent tank. It had been so long, the solvent was clear and all debris had settled to the bottom of the tank, and on the sliders. So I was relieved and thankful, and irritated at myself and fascinated by the novelty all at the same time. They're still in there but at least now I'm pretty sure I'll remember where they are.

[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]

PS: Have you checked your molasses bucket?

Last edited by Stuart Kirk; 08/10/22 2:00 am. Reason: Thought of something else.
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Originally Posted by Hugh Jörgen
They are in your office.
Given the state of my office, while they could be there, they aren't.

Originally Posted by Stuart Kirk
my solvent tank?
The instant I read those words I thought 'molasses', and a few moments later thought of the blasting cabinet as well. Whether or not they're in either location, thanks to your post I now have new places to look instead of constantly returning to the same locations where they aren't

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The more you look the more they aren't there.

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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
..... I now have new places to look instead of constantly returning to the same locations where they aren't
Originally Posted by hardarser
The more you look the more they aren't there.
I'm glad I'm not the only one who does that.

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Originally Posted by Stuart Kirk
I'm glad I'm not the only one who does that.
It's easier to look, and re-look, in places where they should be than try to think where they shouldn't be (but are...).

I'm going to do my best to forget about this for now and hope they magically reappear when I'm looking for something else.

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The tools weren't in the molasses or gunk, or in the blasting cabinet, and saying "all-ee all-ee outs in free" didn't do any good, so now I'm going to pretend not to care in the hopes that tricks them into revealing themselves.

One of the rear wheel adjusters was frozen solid, but Sili-Kroil plus patience managed to get it working perfectly. The following composite doesn't do justice to how bad the adjusters looked before several hours in the vibrating polisher, nor how much better they look after, but now they're ready for the polishing wheel.

[Linked Image]

After reading the manual for my new welding helmet, adjusting the various settings to where I thought they should be, and transferring the cheater lens from one of the Harbor Freight helmets, I did several back-to-back tests of my new Lincoln helmet against the other old one from Harbor Freight that still had its cheater lens in place.

For what it's worth, the headgear of the "Lincoln Viking 3350 with 4C™ Lens Technology" is a definite improvement. One nice feature is an adjustable hard stop for the "down" position. Although the larger viewing area is nice, I think that's going to be of relatively small importance (to me). Also, I'm not sure yet how important the more accurate color rendition will be in practice (i.e. showing a white arc rather than one that is quite greenish), but the way the arc looks is significantly different thanks to the color rendition.

I set the shade to 12 on both helmets, which the Lincoln manual suggests is the best "comfort" setting for arcs in the range 50–150 Amps (10 for <50 A and 14 for 150–500 A) but, absent measurements, I can only assume the actual shade levels are identical. Doing several back-to-back tests at 200 Amps and at 50 Amps, the view through the Lincoln helmet was noticeably better.

One feature of the Lincoln that I hadn't thought would be useful, but which is, is an adjustable time delay after the arc ends and before the shade lightens. I originally set it at the minimum delay of 0.1 seconds, thinking there was no reason to wait. But, during several runs at 200 A I successively increased it to the maximum of 1.0 seconds to eliminate the initial bright light from the hot tungsten electrode. No matter what, I have to hold the torch in place for some number of seconds until the Ar shuts off, and the 1 second delay to allow the tungsten to cool somewhat doesn't affect that, so it's not as if the longer delay has any negative consequence.

I don't know what the spec is for the HF helmet, but the Lincoln is supposed to work for arcs as dim as 2 Amps. However, my welder is supposed to go as low as 1 Amp DC (5 Amps AC), so this could be a problem if I ever needed to weld two pieces of 0.001" steel shim stock together.

At this point I'm very pleased with the improvement over my old helmet. However, it remains to be seen if the placement of the sensors eliminates the problem of "flashing" when the arc is partially obscured, which is what made me look for a newer helmet in the first place.

Last edited by Magnetoman; 08/10/22 9:33 pm. Reason: corrected the brand name
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I haven’t noticed any flashing with my “Lincoln” Viking 3350. For good reason, I’m paranoid about arc eye. This helmet seems pretty sensitive. Ambient lighting might make a difference?

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Originally Posted by Cyborg
my “Lincoln” Viking 3350
It's hard to blame that mistake on a typo… Repeat after me, Miller welder but Lincoln welding helmet.

The flashing I got with my HF helmet were times when the arc was inside an overhang or mini-cave so, apparently, the location of the sensors on the helmet were such that they no longer sensed the presence of an arc.

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This is what’s inside those doodads. I took mine apart…. the Lightning usually didn’t have the fancy knob, spring and detent.

[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]CC7B4A26-E67A-4BD3-8707-380BE5AC65CF by First Last, on Flickr

IIRC, it took some persuasion to get it apart.

[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]C07837C0-E3AE-4E09-83CA-647D33FEA9D8 by First Last, on Flickr

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