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Originally Posted by George Kaplan
A while ago you mused about a Mezzanine and a four post lift. Is that still a possibility?

John

When I was delivering wine I came across a really cleaver idea used in a lot of pubs with underground cellars
Back in the day when they had several full time cellarmen and less stock lines then product was received using slides
Now days when space is at a premium and full time cellarmen uneconomic , a lot of them used old electric fork lifts as they do not require any building modifications.
A good friend built a mezzaning floor & uses an old pallet stacker to the same effect .
Even better , if there are no batteries, it makes it very hard for thieves to get the bikes out .
With a bit of fabricationg no reason not to make a work bench to fit long ways on the tynes so it serves a double purpose .


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Originally Posted by BSA_WM20
electric fork lifts ... pallet stacker
The limitation of any plan to add a mezzanine is that the space saved by moving bikes there has to be greater than the cost in space on the ground floor due to the footprint of the mechanism used to elevate the bikes, plus whatever free space is needed for maneuvering. This eliminates a fork lift or pallet stacker.

15 - General Hand Tools

Although I wrote several times in this thread that I wouldn't cover "standard" hand tools, you didn't actually believe me when I wrote that, did you?…

When I was preparing for the Cannonball, I made a list of tools to take along. I refined that list based on what I saw being used by others on the Cannonball, and refined it further when preparing a list of tools to carry in my trailer. After additional thought when writing this thread, the result is the following fairly-comprehensive, but un-illustrated, list comprising a set of hand tools for someone's garage that would allow them to do most mechanical work on old American, British, European, Indian, and Japanese motorcycles, short of fixing a connecting rod through the cases.

If I also were to cover tools that use electricity, which I won't, I think the only essential ones on such a list if I made it, which I won't, would be a multimeter, electric drill and soldering iron.

Ratchets, Extensions, Adapters, etc.
-- ¼" --
Ratchet
Screwdriver-type wrench
T-handle wrench
Speed wrench
Extension: 2½"
¼"-to-⅜" adapter
Universal joint
-- ⅜" --
Ratchet
Breaker bar
T-handle wrench
Speed wrench
Extensions: 2½", 5½" and 9½"
⅜"-to-¼" adapter
⅜"-to-½" adapter
Universal joint
-- ½" --
Ratchet
Breaker bar
Extension: 2½"
½"-to-⅜" adapter
Universal joint

British Spanners and Sockets
-- Spanners
Combination __ 3/16" – 5/8" BS (⅛W – 9/16W)
Open ________ 0–11 BA
-- Sockets
¼" __________ 0 – 10 BA
⅜" __________ 3/16" – 9/16" BS (⅛W – ½W)
⅜" deep ______ 3/16" – 9/16" BS (⅛W – ½W)
½" __________ ¼" – 11/16" BS (3/16W – ⅝W)

A/F Wrenches and Sockets:
-- Spanners
Combination __ ¼" – ¾"
Open ________ ⅜"×7/16" – ¾"×⅞"
Ring ________ ¼"×5/16" – 1⅛"×1-5/16"
Flare ________ ⅜"×7/16" & ½"×9/16"
Ignition ______ 5/32"×3/16" – ⅜"×7/16"
-- Sockets
¼" __________ 5/32" – ½"
¼" deep ______ 3/16" – ½"
⅜" __________ ¼" – 15/16"
⅜" deep ______ ⅜" – 15/16" plus ⅝" & 13/16" spark plug
½" __________ ½" – 1¼"
½" deep ______ 1" (for spark plugs)
Metric Spanners and Sockets
-- Spanners
Ignition ______ 4 – 11 mm
Combination __ 8 – 23 mm
-- Sockets
¼" __________ 4 – 14 mm
⅜" __________ 9 – 19 mm
⅜" deep ______ 9 – 16 mm

Other Sockets
⅛" – ⅜" Allen
Screwdriver bits in several sizes
Phillips screwdriver bits in several sizes

[General Hand Tools: to be continued]

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Not to hijack my own thread, but…

We just received word from Phaidon of, not one, but two auspicious events that are now scheduled for fall: the publication of NYBSAGUY's Guitar, The Shape of Sound, 100 Iconic Designs, and the republication of The Motorcycle: Design, Art, Desire.

Order now, or risk possible disappointment if they misjudge the print runs.

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Ha, you have never been known to hijack your own, or anyone else's thread..

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Other Hand Tools

Special tools and jigs for the specific bike(s)
Analog 25 ft.lb torque wrench
Analog 150 ft.lb. torque wrench
6" Needle nose pliers/wire cutter
8" Pliers
9" Slip joint pliers
Adjustable spanners, 2½", 6" and 12"
Vise-Grips: 5", 6" Needle nose and 7"
Allen wrench set, 1/16" – ⅜"
Allen wrench set, 1.5 – 8 mm
Screwdrivers, various sizes from stubby to large
Phillips screwdrivers, various sizes from stubby to large
Assortment of jeweler's screwdrivers
90-degree screwdriver
90-degree Phillips screwdriver
Inside/outside snap-ring pliers
Sheet metal shears
Pop-rivet tool kit:
-- ⅛" and 3/16"-dia. rivets with lengths ⅛" – ⅜"
-- ⅛" and 3/16" drill bits
-- 4"×5½" sheet of 0.025" steel for making patches
Scissors
Hole punch
Small stainless wire brush
Magnet on a telescoping holder
Mirror on a telescoping holder
Assorted hooks and picks
2½-lb. hammer
Copper/hide mallet
Small rubber hammer
Impact driver, hammer-type
Swiss Army knife
Magnifier headband with 1.6×, 2×, 2.5× and 3.5× lenses
Valve lapping suction stick
LED flashlight
Cu tubing cutter
Cu tubing bender
Propane torch with soldering iron attachment
Safety wire pliers
Files, round and half-round, coarse and fine
Thread file
A/F tap and die set
Valve spring compressor
Neway valve seat cutters in the appropriate size(s) with mandrels
Piston ring expander
Piston ring compressor
Deglazing hone
Blind bearing puller set (5/16”–1½”)
Chisel/punch set
Combination 2/3-jaw pullers
(2) ea. 4" and 8” C-clamps

[General Hand Tools: to be continued]

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Sorry to go back a few posts but I promise this is the last from me on either of this but I needed to close a loop I left open. I measured my volts. I get single phase voltages of 245V, 241V & 246V and three phase of 423V. 418V & 426V. That tells me that my pole mounted transformer is probably giving me something near its rated output.

Back on topic.

Originally Posted by Magnetoman
9" Slip joint pliers
I highly recommend a pair of Knipex Smart Grip pliers. I do have standard slip joint pliers but the Smart Grips are my Go-To when I need to grip something with pliers.

[Linked Image from m.media-amazon.com]


John

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Originally Posted by George Kaplan
I highly recommend a pair of Knipex Smart Grip pliers.
I don't have any myself, but I just looked at Amazon and discovered they come in at least a half-dozen variations. So, which variation(s) do you recommend?

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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
... I just looked at Amazon and discovered they come in at least a half-dozen variations. So, which variation(s) do you recommend?
Interesting, on UK Amazon only one set comes up when I search Knipex Smart Grip.

The ones I have are marked "85 01 250". They are great for 85% to 90% of times although occasionally I would like either a smaller or larger size.

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Originally Posted by George Kaplan
Interesting, on UK Amazon only one set comes up when I search Knipex Smart Grip.
As can be seen, you've been subjected to another round of post-War rationing.

[Linked Image]

Glancing through the 26 hits, about half are clearly not applicable (wire cutters, sets of pliers, sponsored choices having nothing whatever to do with my search, etc.), but that still leaves a dozen more than you have to select from.

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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
you've been subjected to another round of post-War rationing.
The only War on here that I am aware of is the "Tool War" and it does seem that I am being rationed in respect of that conflict. Fortunately I am part of the "Tool War" equivalent of Switzerland or Eire so I dont have to call the United Nations just yet to defend me from hostile enemy action as I have neutral status.

The pliers that I have are brilliant and I highly recommend them (again). A couple of other people who have seen me using them have been impressed enough to immediately placed orders for some themselves.

John

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Originally Posted by George Kaplan
[They are great for 85% to 90% of times although occasionally I would like either a smaller or larger size.
OK, since you mentioned size, there's the model number you recommended:

[Linked Image]

and then there are sets of three of different sizes.

[Linked Image]

Presumably, the gizmo between the handles on yours does something useful, but if given the choice between yours, and the set of three (those are the only choices you're allowed in the present exercise), which would you pick?

p.s. I imagine some argumentative people might insist I already have too many of that style of pliers, not understanding that "too many" is an alien concept.

[Linked Image]

As can be seen, I modified the top one with copper soft jaws. Like you, I use the "normal" size pliers 85–90% of the time, the next size smaller 10–15% of the time, and the smallest one the remaining 7.5% of the time.

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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
Presumably, the gizmo between the handles on yours does something useful, but if given the choice between yours, and the set of three (those are the only choices you're allowed in the present exercise), which would you pick?
The gizmo between the handles appears to be what provides the magic for the self-adjusting capability.

Thanks, John, now I have to stop myelf spending more money.

Originally Posted by Magnetoman
p.s. I imagine some argumentative people might insist I already have too many of that style of pliers, not understanding that "too many" is an alien concept.

[Linked Image]

As can be seen, I modified the top one with copper soft jaws. Like you, I use the "normal" size pliers 85–90% of the time, the next size smaller 10–15% of the time, and the smallest one the remaining 7.5% of the time.
The Knipex Cobra set have much finer adjustment and finer teeth in the jaws, so should mangle nuts and studs less than the others shown above.
The jaw shape is better for grabbing things as well.

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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
and then there are sets of three of different sizes.

Presumably, the gizmo between the handles on yours does something useful, but if given the choice between yours, and the set of three (those are the only choices you're allowed in the present exercise), which would you pick?
The gizmo between the handles of the "SmartGrip style is a spring loaded mechanism that has gentle spring pressure that opens the jaws against hand pressure. Then when you close the jaws around something the same spring pressure moves the locking mechanism against the nearest ratchet groove. When not in use they lock shut using the small catch near the top of the red part of the handle, if you look closelty at the picture you will see the word "open" and a small arrow, next to that is the catch.

The set of three is available to me too but they lack the spring loaded mechanism.

I would choose the "Smart Grips" every time. (of course I would want to choose both)

Originally Posted by Magnetoman
p.s. I imagine some argumentative people might insist I already have too many of that style of pliers, not understanding that "too many" is an alien concept.
"Too many" is a phrase that's impossible to use in the context of tools.

John

P.S. The reason for my choice is that I too have several sets available to me similar to the array that Magnetoman has shown but now that I have the Smart Grips I pass the other styles over in preference to the Smart Grips every time.

P.P.S. There are several YouTube video reviews of the Smart Grips if you were wondering exactly how they work.

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MM, is there a hierarchy to your pantheon of tools?
I ask because so far only an ancient seal puller and a frayed strap wrench have warranted your personal Sharpied mark.
Or do seal pullers just have an elevated rate of pilferage?


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Originally Posted by George Kaplan
I would choose the "Smart Grips" every time. (of course I would want to choose both)
Thanks very much for your review. Lest you think I've lost the will to add tools, sometimes a feature only has minimal value, at significantly increased cost, so my question was to get your thoughts on that. The 'Smart Grips' feature only seems to be on the one size, while a set has all three sizes of the 'Dumb Grips' type.

Unfortunately, even though I ordered it before 9am, Amazon's service is so slow that delivery of my Knipex 'Smart Grips' isn't scheduled until 4-7pm, meaning I won't be able to use it until tomorrow (assuming I'll actually need it tomorrow, for some task I presently can't foresee).

Originally Posted by Hugh Jörgen
MM, is there a hierarchy to your pantheon of tools?
Thanks for catching that issue, which I can't fix until Morgan fixes an issue with the software.

As for a question you didn't ask, loaning tools, I rarely (very, very rarely) have loaned tools (and never loan books) and, even then, only to the most trusted of friends. Aside from any other consideration, if you have more than one friend (which I suspect not everyone reading Britbike does…), loaning to trusted-friend 'A' risks non-trusted-friend 'B' finding out and then being offended when you won't loan tools to him.

-- Tires, Chains and Cables --

Tire Tools, Supplies and Spares
Rubber cement, patches, grit cloth and stitcher
Tire pump
Tire pressure gauge
Key for unscrewing valve inserts and tap/die for fixing threads
Schraeder valve inserts
3-leg wheel stand
(2) Motion Pro BeadPro bead breakers
(2) Motion Pro Bead Buddies
(2) Tire spoons
Talcum powder tire/tube "lube"
Male and female tube stem fishing lines
Strap
Bead lubricant
Brush
Baja No-Pinch tool

Chain Tools, Supplies and Spares
Drive chain clamp
Chain breakers
Motion Pro PBR press/break/rivet kit:
-- Motion Pro chain breaker with 3 pins
-- Master link installer jig
X-ring master link press

Cable Tools, Supplies and Spares
Felco cable cutter
Venhill bird cage tool set
(5 ft. ea.) 1.5 mm, 2 mm and 2.5 mm inner cable for throttle, clutch and brake
(2) boxes of cable nipples
Solder pot filled with solder (heated with the propane torch)
Stay-Clean flux for cable solder
Bottle of sodium bicarbonate acid flux neutralizer

Although more tools could be added to the above list (of course I'd say that, wouldn't I?), if you can think of something essential that is missing from this, ahem, minimal set of hand tools, by all means mention it.

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Electricians call them water pump pliers....I used a 440 Channellocks daily for conduit work. It was a pipe reamer, wrench and hammer. the top tool edge got peened over from beating on stuff...Channelock brand was more durable in constant use....


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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
Thanks very much for your review. Lest you think I've lost the will to add tools, sometimes a feature only has minimal value, at significantly increased cost, so my question was to get your thoughts on that. The 'Smart Grips' feature only seems to be on the one size, while a set has all three sizes of the 'Dumb Grips' type.
Hmm. Everyone has different opinions on if something represents value or not. I hope you like this particular item even half as much as I do.

Actually I have two sets. Last year someone was helping me with something and they saw me using them and started raving about how great they were and how they should get some. As it happened it was only a week away from this persons birthday so later that day I ordered some as a gift for this person. A couple of days before his birthday I saw him again and he mentioned his Smart Grips had been delivered the previous day. I ordered a different gift for him and kept the second pair myself.

Originally Posted by Magnetoman
Unfortunately, even though I ordered it before 9am, Amazon's service is so slow that delivery of my Knipex 'Smart Grips' isn't scheduled until 4-7pm, meaning I won't be able to use it until tomorrow (assuming I'll actually need it tomorrow, for some task I presently can't foresee).
Damn those First World Problems again!

Originally Posted by Magnetoman
Although more tools could be added to the above list (of course I'd say that, wouldn't I?), if you can think of something essential that is missing from this, ahem, minimal set of hand tools, by all means mention it.
I had a quick glance through my toolboxes and I think you have covered all the essentials. I have a few different variations but nothing worth noting apart from the Smart Grips that we have discussed above and this:

[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]

[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]

This is just a bit holder which I know that you have covered. It has a holder for a standard bit on one side and a 1/4" square drive on the other. You will note I have put some sharpie marks on it and thats because I have used it quite a lot to adjust carburettors where its impossible to do so with anything else I can think of. Most recently (say 3 weeks ago) I used it to adjust the carburettor on a Yamaha Big Bear Quad where nothing else (that I have at least) would fit without taking the carb off.

As an aside, I bought this bit holder in a Sears (I guess it might be Craftsman brand?) in Fort Myers when we were staying on Sanibel Island maybe 15 years ago. What else does one do when on vacation other than go tool shopping? smile

John

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Originally Posted by George Kaplan
I have used it quite a lot to adjust carburettors where its impossible to do so with anything else I can think of.
These do the same impossible task for me:

[Linked Image]

Originally Posted by George Kaplan
What else does one do when on vacation other than go tool shopping?
I bought several of my ½"-drive BSW sockets in a hardware store somewhere in Norway in 1975, while making our way slowly and indirectly between conferences in Finland and Holland.

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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
delivery of my Knipex 'Smart Grips' isn't scheduled until 4-7pm,
It arrived at 6:58pm so technically it wasn't late, although they did cut it close.

[Linked Image]

I have to admit it, it's nice to live in the First World. Amazon doesn't quite provide immediate gratification, but they're not far from it.

----------------------
immediate gratification
the experience of satisfaction or receipt of reward as soon as a response is made.
Dictionary of the American Psychological Association
------------------------
"… over-reliance on instant gratification behaviors can create problems by changing our brains, distracting us from more meaningful pursuits, and leading to destructive financial, social, and health outcomes."
Psychology Today
------------------------

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Glad you (seem) to like them. I really love it when I get something that is well designed and well made and is nice to use (particularly tools).

Its not just the opiate like immediate gratification but also the long term experience. In the case of these pliers I appreciate them every time I use them, much like I do with certain other tools that "hit the spot".

John

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16 - Marque-Specific OEM and Custom-Made Special Tools, Jigs and Fixtures

Manufacturers supplied a number of special tools for their various machines at the time they were in production. For example, the next two photographs show the covers of multi-page catalogs of BSA's factory-made tools for models sold in the 1950s and 1960s.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Some OEM tools originally supplied by the various manufacturers occasionally appear on eBay, and some others are available as aftermarket reproductions. But, even when they can't be purchased, they and other useful ones the factories never supplied can be made using the machinery described in this thread.

Although the first catalog shows approximately 15 special tools each for pre-unit BSA singles and twins (many tools are common to both, so there aren't 30 different ones), I have 92 special tools and jigs for these models, not counting additional ones for AMAL and Lucas. Obviously, many of the tools I have are ones the BSA factory never supplied, although each of them makes a specific job much easier.

Depending on the depth of one's obsession, someone interested in working on British motorcycles will need special tools for AMAL and Lucas, as well as for at least one marque, and possibly for engines with one, two, three or four cylinders. Dividing this further, in addition to engines, there are special tools and jigs for gearboxes, clutches, and frames. Even a specific capacity of motorcycle from a given marque was made in several forms in just the post-WWII period, and each variation typically requires at least a few special tools unique to it.

In my case, I have special tools for AJS/Matchless, Ariel, BSA, Bultaco, Ducati, Honda, Norton (even though I've never owned one), Triumph, and Vincent. Although the tools I have don't cover all models of any of these marques, I have 227 such tools for just the British motorcycles. I estimate I made three-quarters of these tools using the tooling described in these threads, because they aren't available commercially. The point is, it takes a lot of special tools to work on British motorcycles, you can't buy most of them, but you can make them.

[16-Marque-Specific OEM and Custom-Made Special Tools, Jigs and Fixtures: might, or might not be continued after 'Conclusion']

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Do you have a smoothing iron? Yer sheets are needin the creases seen to.


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Originally Posted by gavin eisler
Do you have a smoothing iron? Yer sheets are needin the creases seen to.
The sheets are perfectly flat; it's your computer's monitor that's creased...

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99 - Oversights and Omissions

This Section uses the same section headings as I previously used, to add items I missed when preparing this thread. Although, given the current length of this thread, you may think there couldn't be much more to add, this is the first of what will be at least five posts containing those missing items. No doubt, even with this section I will have missed some items.

03D - Dent Repair and Painting
Dust-Free Paint Booth

It may seem excessive (because maybe it is…), but I constructed a dust-free paint booth based on a 6×8 ft. metal garden shed, in which I sealed all the seams and joints, installed insulation on the walls and roof, an LED light fixture, and an A/C unit with insulated inlet and exhaust lines.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Air flow across the parts while they are being painted is supplied by the filtered outlet of a fan, and air for breathing is supplied by the Hobbyair respirator shown earlier in this thread. Construction of this shed is described in detail in another thread starting approximately here..

[99-Oversights and Omissions: to be continued]

Joined: Sep 2021
Posts: 151
Likes: 28
Slow and old
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Slow and old
Joined: Sep 2021
Posts: 151
Likes: 28
6x8 ft is about the space that I have free to work on the current project.


"Love 'em all.... Let GOD sort 'em out!"
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