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Originally Posted by Cyborg
You didn’t actually tell me to go [***] myself, but it was implied.
What??? No way, and [***] you for thinking I told you to [***] yourself, buster. Of course, whenever you show a tool that you have that I don't, [***] you for that.

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Originally Posted by NYBSAGUY
Originally Posted by Cyborg
If I have a great mind, how come it didn’t get me through high school?
..... I have long ago learned not to equate great minds with great education.........
"Great minds think alike."

No aspersions intended but just so we know what's being implied, the rest of that saying reportedly goes: "But fools seldom differ."

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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
. Of course, whenever you show a tool that you have that I don't, [***] you for that.


[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]D037502C-F749-4E83-AEC7-29660AD84E0E by First Last, on Flickr

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Quote
Great minds think alike

I'm not so sure about that, I've tried welding quite a few times using both arc and mig, and I've never really got on well with it even when using self-darkening masks.

I've sold off all my welding gear and if I need any welding, mig, tig alloy, or anything, I just take it to the welding shop up the road who do a superb job on anything I bring in for pennies and can also use their large selection of machine tools to mill, drill, grind or make other adjustments.

As much as I like to do the majority of tasks myself, there comes a time when its just easier to hand off work to people with more experience than I will ever have.


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Originally Posted by gunner
there comes a time when its just easier to hand off work to people with more experience than I will ever have.
In addition to great (or foolish…) minds, Cyborg and I share an interest in being able to do things ourselves. Hence, the Tooling Wars®, because it requires tools to do things. However, not everyone shares this interest to the extent we do, and I'm sure there are plenty of people who could do the kind of work we enjoy doing, but who choose to hand it off instead

As for people with more experience, certainly most professional welders, machinists and electronics technicians are more skilled than I am (most motorcycle mechanics, maybe not so much…). Luckily, though, the skill level of any of those disciplines that's required to do excellent, age-appropriate repairs on old British motorcycles is well within the reach of a non-professional like me.

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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
In addition to great (or foolish…) minds, Cyborg and I share an interest in being able to do things ourselves.
Count me in as also being someone who has an interest in doing things myself also coupled with being interested in learning new things.

I am currently on a steep learning curve rebuilding something (non motorcycle related) that in theory is quite simple but I keep hitting roadblocks due to my lack of previous experience in this field. However it is a great learning experience albeit a bit of a slow one as each roadblock usually means a small component needs to be replaced that I need to procure. Once done however the next one (likelihood almost zero) will be much easier.

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Originally Posted by George Kaplan
coupled with being interested in learning new things.
That's a major factor for me as well. Rebuilding the head of a 1928 Ariel is a lot more work than changing oil, repairing a puncture, or any other kind of maintenance work, but I much prefer repairing the head (once…), because of what I learn doing so. I hate maintenance because it's mindless work.

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The local TAFE college (technical college) was at one point offering electroplating 'metals restoration' courses for minimal cost. like $100 a year = 1 afternoon per week. Chrome, nickel, copper, cad, silver even gold. (you had to supply the gold used yourself though !) Apparently their trade student numbers were declining, and they needed some minimum numbers to keep their courses running.

New skills, new skills.....
& Gov't funded bike restos !

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I should perhaps add that the plating tanks were (deliberately) small - so no car wheels or bikes rims or tanks would fit. They'd use a LOT of chrome, which is expensive in any quantity.

The 1st job I tried was a rather pitted Commando chrome headlamp shell. This was beyond commercial repair. But with a lot of grinding, copper filling and polishing, it came up like new. When I totted up the hours this all took, it came to something like the equivalent of $700 of labour alone - some time back now.

And the smallish tanks used there contained something like $30,000 worth of chromic acid.
So you don't hear of too many folks with 'proper' tanks at home to do their own chroming. !
Sure, Caswells offer various assorted kits to do about the same job. About ....

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Just the thing for all the specially fabricated small parts for my Project - if I'd finished fabricating them all.


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So get fabricating ! ?
(I could well say that to me, having a few projects that need things, and not available off the shelf ...)

I'd further comment that for many plating jobs of refurbishing older bits, 99% of the cost is in the labour of doing the grinding and polishing. So if you deliver all your prized bits to the plater already highly polished, then the cost will be reduced. Possibly much reduced, for bigger stuff anyway.

Getting steel bits to a gleaming near mirror finish is not difficult, it just takes a bit of well judged linishing, and a range of polishing mops, and putting in the hours Yep, polishing steel is not usually a quick process....

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Two days ago we had one of those "microbursts" I mentioned in an earlier post, and I found some water on the floor of my paint booth afterwards. Although I suspect sealing of the doors was at fault, which I hadn't held shut using the clamping mechanism I designed for this, I used the opportunity to buy another two tubes of silicone caulk and thoroughly (re)seal every seam, cover a few places that looked like previous caulk might not have fully sealed, and encase every not-already-encased screw head. There's a 50% chance of rain for each of the next four days that might test my efforts, although rain often doesn't come with microbursts.

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Not to hijack my own thread, but…

We just received word from Phaidon of, not one, but two auspicious events that are now scheduled for fall: the publication of NYBSAGUY's Guitar, The Shape of Sound, 100 Iconic Designs, and the republication of The Motorcycle: Design, Art, Desire.

Order now, or risk possible disappointment if they misjudge the print runs.

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Ha. You have never been known to hijack your own, or anyone else's thread.

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Hah! that's not a microburst, it's rattler piss.

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Originally Posted by hardarser
Hah! that's not a microburst, it's rattler piss.
Oh dear, I hope not…

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We had wind and 0.1" of rain last night, but not at the same time. So, it was a test, but not a good test, of whether my additional work to microburst-proof the booth succeeded. No liquid of any kind was on the floor when I checked this morning.

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It was 96 ℉ in full sunlight just after 12:00 noon yesterday when I measured the inside temperature to be ~74 ℉.

[Linked Image]

If the insulation on the shed and on the inlet/outlet hoses of the A/C unit were perfect, the temperature of the outside metal skin of the shed wouldn't matter, and what would determine the temperature would be the amount by which the compressor and radiator inside the A/C unit could reduce the temperature of the outside air. That is, the temperature of the outside air would determine the temperature of the inside of the shed.

If the insulation isn't perfect, which it isn't, some of the heat from the 150+ ℉ outside skin will enter the shed and add to the load on the A/C unit, increasing the temperature over that which it would have had with perfect insulation. The walls feel cool so I believe the inside temperature is mostly determined by that of the outside air, not the hot skin, which means I can expect the A/C unit to drop the temperature by ~22 ℉ with respect to that of the outside air whether it is sunny or cloudy.

Basically, this means that the A/C will cool the inside enough to work even on the hottest days of the year, as long as I paint before lunchtime. If I insist on painting during mid-afternoon, that will be possible 85% of the year if I don't want to work when it's warmer than 82 ℉ (the record hottest year had 57 days at or above 105 ℉; the booth would be at 83 ℉ on a 105-degree day).

After measuring the temperature, I turned off the A/C, left one of the doors open, and used the fan for about three hours to be sure everything inside was bone dry.

[Linked Image]

When I finally finished what I was doing and came back to the booth, I turned off the fan and laid newspaper on the floor to serve as a tell-tale if any of it is touched by moisture during the next rain.

[Linked Image]

Overnight we had 0.2", although I don't know if it was windy, with no sign of water on the newspapers.

The next photograph shows the front of the paint shed.

[Linked Image]

It would be a lot easier to make water-tight if it didn't have doors...

If you look closely, at the top and bottom of the doors are clamps that press the doors against seals. The silver tape is Nashua 324A, 4.8 mil Al backed by adhesive rated to 325 ℉. Some of the strips of that tape are sealing seams that are already sealed with RTV (belt and braces), however some of it is serving as a UV shield over Gorilla 'All Weather Waterproof Duct Tape', sold for outdoor use and rated to 200 ℉, as well as over the rubber weatherstripping that seals the seam between the two doors. The Gorilla tape says it's "UV resistant" but Al definitely is so, again, belt and braces.

The cement blocks in front are where I'll remove my shoes, then step inside into disposable shoe covers, leaving my shoes outdoors for scorpions to crawl into while I'm painting. I haven't decided yet whether to cover the blocks with a vinyl mat, or if that would just provide yet another habitat for unwanted critters.

A question that I hope someone has an answer to is, how should I clean the inside walls and ceiling? Cutting the insulation pieces produced a fine dust that I had to wipe from the surfaces to get the sealing tape to stick. However, that was a fairly superficial cleaning, so the walls and ceiling need a thorough cleaning before the booth is ready. If I use wet paper towels, each one would quickly become saturated with insulation dust, leaving as much behind as it picked up. Is there a better way than using hundreds of wet paper towels?

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Will the overspray need to be cleaned up after a round of painting?

Gordon


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Originally Posted by Gordon Gray
Will the overspray need to be cleaned up after a round of painting?
Good question. I'll hang a plastic sheet on the wall behind the parts, that will extend under them as well, that should collect most of the overspray. A coarse A/C filter on the outlet will capture most of the paint that tries to escape the booth and, depending on how fast I find that it clogs, I can add a rag in front of it.

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>> how should I clean the inside walls and ceiling?

Large size lint roller?
https://www.amazon.com/Scotch-Brite153-Large-Lint-Roller-Stickier/dp/B07F1VGDGJ


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Originally Posted by Hugh Jörgen
Large size lint roller?
That's an excellent suggestion. Thanks.

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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
Originally Posted by Hugh Jörgen
Large size lint roller?
That's an excellent suggestion. Thanks.

Probably won’t get all the nooks and crannies.

Compressed air? Try to blow the stuff outside. Plenty of dust/dirt out there already.

I know you want it spotless…….vacuum, lint roller and those wet paper towels might be your best shot.

G

Last edited by Gordon Gray; 08/08/22 7:05 pm.

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Originally Posted by Gordon Gray
I know you want it spotless…….
I'll do my best to make it spotless inside. But, contrary to expected practice, I'll first paint several invaluable BSA parts before painting anything from a lesser marque like a Vincent. Hopefully, any residual dust that escaped my cleaning that is loose enough for flowing air to knock off the walls, will be knocked off during those initial sessions.

I'm afraid compressed air would just move dust from one place to another, but a lint roller is on order, and wet paper towels will deal with the corners, nooks, and crannies.

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