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Hello all
I'm new here and just brought home my first Brit bike. According to the serial number this is a July 1970 B44SS. It's mostly there but I can still go back and search the hangar from whence it came. I'm pretty sure I got the right set of wheels with it. It has TLS front brake and the quick disconnect rear. But it has an extra collar on the rear axle that I can't quite understand. It's attached to the stub axle that passes through the brake backing plate and the stub axle has internal threads behind that collar. Can someone help me understand how this rear hub works? I'm going to share out the photos from my flickr site so bear with me if I screw it up!

Thanks, and glad to make all your acquaintances - Jim
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com] That's my garage, the TR6 is mine...

Last edited by Jim Harris; 06/29/22 4:54 pm.

1970 BSA Shooting Star In-work
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Could you be talking about the spacer that goes behind the speedo drive to keep you from crushing it?

Gordon


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Thanks Gordon

OK, could the speedo drive be on the RH side of the hub? The collar I'm looking at (in the second photo) is on the LH side, inside the cavity where the toothed drive engages between the brake hub and the wheel hub. It currently blocks the two parts from engaging. Does that make sense?

Jim


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All the inards from my disassembled b44 vs 69 hub

[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]

2 thrust washers 2 bearings inner axle sleeve (stuck on bearing)
Outer axle sleeve, bearing retainer
The bottom 3 are all together, the outer big dust cover on the tacho drive sandwiches that lower rubber into the hub, I guess for vibration

[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]
[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]
The order I took them apart:

I just happen to be cleaning those parts in the hopes my wheel bearings show up

Last edited by DAMadd; 06/29/22 6:21 pm.

65 TR6R 68A65T 69 B44VS. 74 T150V 19 Chieftain
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Originally Posted by Jim Harris
Thanks Gordon

OK, could the speedo drive be on the RH side of the hub? The collar I'm looking at (in the second photo) is on the LH side, inside the cavity where the toothed drive engages between the brake hub and the wheel hub. It currently blocks the two parts from engaging. Does that make sense?

Jim


Yep……take it out and try putting the two splined pieces together. That’s the Quick Disconnect Hub. ( aka QD hub)

I really hate doing this on my phone……I can’t see very well on it. I hate it as much as not being able to help with something I’ve done dozens of times.

Gordon

Last edited by Gordon Gray; 06/29/22 6:30 pm.

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Also at least mine are both left hand thread. The spline side retainer and the tacho drive/retainer.


65 TR6R 68A65T 69 B44VS. 74 T150V 19 Chieftain
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OK, I get it!

That exploded drawing helped. Item 35 has the collar I was trying to describe and it must have been confusing 'cause it's all one piece. Anyway, I had to push that piece further into the brake hub and it was frozen. I don't muscle things till I understand them better. A little WD40 and it started to slip into place. All fits right now.

Thanks guys.


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NOW I see. That is what I call the stub axle. I think BSA called it the fixed spindle. It holds the brake side in place when you remove the wheel. The removable axle screws into it.

The piece I was talking about resembles a spool.

No one was born knowing this stuff and we’re all in this brotherhood ( even though I found out just this week the really cool people don’t like to be referred to as brother?) together.

You’ve come to the right place. Plenty of knowledgeable people here willing to help.

Gordon

Last edited by Gordon Gray; 06/29/22 8:01 pm.

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Mostly I just ask questions, I rarely get to answer but literally had the book open and was sorting thru the rear axle stuff


65 TR6R 68A65T 69 B44VS. 74 T150V 19 Chieftain
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Welcome to the forum, Jim.
Gordon is "the man" for BSA/Triumph unit singles, so you're in good hands. Peter Quick, who runs BSA Unit Singles, is also a forum member.

One of the first things to do is to get hold of the parts and workshop manuals. These are available on DVD (see the top of the left sidebar), as real paper versions from a number of the site's sponsors, and some are available for free download from various places.

In my biased opinion, the late B44 is the best of the BSA unit singles.

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nice triumph!

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Originally Posted by Bob E
nice triumph!

No joke……my dream car, even in the correct color.

Shane’s were kind words but I’m far from being “the man” for BSA unit singles.

I do love them and have since I saw my first one around 1969. A 1965 BSA Enduro Star……it’s been a long love affair since then.

But the more I “think” I learn the more I realize…… just how little I know about them. Then there’s that CRS I suffer from that is getting worse.

I’ve found over the years that you really didn’t need to know everything but it sure helps to know people who know what you don’t.

kommando has to rank it the top 5 unit singles “men” pretty much all around.

Steve Erickson…..knows ( and more importantly remembers…..) more details….and there’s a LOT of them than any one person I know or have heard about.

Ed V…..has to be on the list….engine related you’d be hard pressed to find better.

Don Roe….BUT….if not better Don ranks right up there with Ed V. He came over to my place and picked up a box of loose parts, that would make up a complete engine. Nothing together at all. Calls me up in the afternoon the next day so I can hear it run.

There’s several folks that fit in here…….we’ve lost a few along the way

About the only list I belong on is “ He who runs on the most”

We can learn from everybody

Gordon

Last edited by Gordon Gray; 06/30/22 1:16 pm.

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Originally Posted by Jim Harris
Hello all
I'm new here....
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
That's my garage, the TR6 is mine...
Originally Posted by Bob E
nice triumph!
Hi Jim and welcome to the group. I had a '71 TR6 that was my daily driver for almost a decade. Put over 100K miles on it but I blamed it for my back trouble and sold it..
But I've also had several unit single BSA's too, C15's to B50's. I've lost count but it is at least 10, probably more.
I'm sure you will enjoy your bike once it is up and running and there are plenty of seasoned folk here to help you get there.
Welcome aboard.
Stuart.

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Thanks kindly for all the introductions! It's good to meet you all.

I've had this 69 TR6 for something like 7 years now. I bought it as a basket case but in very good condition, just all in well inventoried boxes. The PO had taken it apart in 1991 and never got back to putting it together, but had a pretty good stash of replacement parts bought from Victoria British for example. After I had it running and sorted out I took it back to find the PO (the car was bought new in our same town). I met his son and grand son but unfortunately the PO himself had passed away. The grandson in particular looked longingly at the TR, having only ever seen it in pieces, and remembered his grandfather.

It's a good hobby, keeping these fine machines alive. I'm really glad to join your community finally. I raced motocross and road raced bikes in my younger years but sold my bikes when we started to have a family. Not sorry I did that but it's good to have a bike I always wanted.

Jim


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I always love the background to many of these bike photos listed. Just as interesting as the bikes. Well done on being a caring custodian of a lovely TR series car.

Ray

Last edited by BrizzoBrit; 06/30/22 2:22 am.

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The various manuals and parts lists are available for free download from Peter Quick's BSA Unit Singles, link at bottom of page, Also an invaluable source of virtually every part.
The Rupert Ratio books Vol 1 & 2 are the definitive works on all knowledge, history and strip down and re build ..... has any one ever found an error or omission??

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Originally Posted by Dave Martin
..... has any one ever found an error or omission??

A few of the specifications at the end of volume 1 are incorrect (at least the 1967 oil capacities for gearbox and primary drive, and the number of teeth on WD B40 gearbox and rear sprockets). I've seen some other (very few) incorrect but not very important data in other places too. Overall, the Ratio books are the most reliable and useful I've seen. Getting my basket case bike back in good running order without these books would have been a unnecessary challenge.


BSA WM20 (1941), BSA A10 (1958), BSA WD B40 (1968), Husqvarna CR 250 (1981), Triumph Tiger 800 XC (2014)
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Originally Posted by Pelle
Originally Posted by Dave Martin
..... has any one ever found an error or omission??

A few of the specifications at the end of volume 1 are incorrect (at least the 1967 oil capacities for gearbox and primary drive, and the number of teeth on WD B40 gearbox and rear sprockets). I've seen some other (very few) incorrect but not very important data in other places too. Overall, the Ratio books are the most reliable and useful I've seen. Getting my basket case bike back in good running order without these books would have been a unnecessary challenge.

ALL the Rupert’s books are worth the money IMO. But like Pelle says…..you NEED to compare ALL the written info you can find because ALL of the manuals get something…….I don’t want to call it “wrong”…..but you will see different info. I don’t know anybody who could go through all the written info and pin point ALL the mistakes/differences……at least not yet.

I “think” some of the differences could come from manuals being for different countries???? I use Peter Quick’s on line manuals the most but I compare. Workshop, Owners manual, Parts manual AND Rupert’s……and then decide what info I want to use.

We’re lucky to have what we have to work with.

Welcome to the wonderful world of BSA ownership.

Gordon

Last edited by Gordon Gray; 06/30/22 2:02 pm.

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Don't forget the reflections on the human condition in the Ratio books. His observations on the use of the kitchen facilities for essential maintenance and the impact on marital harmony should not be taken lightly. The "cooking" of the drive chain in the old style "lube" and the resultant all pervading stench comes to mind.

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Yes, now that I see the spare parts list, with those wonderful exploded views, I can really make a list of what I need. First, by going back and continue to search through the seller's stuff. Peter Quick's site seems to be a good resource but I gotta ask - what is meant by "Unit"?

BTW, I'm glad to have a side burner on my BBQ grill!

Last edited by Jim Harris; 06/30/22 4:25 pm.

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The transmission is incorporated to the engine case, not separate. The older machines have a separate gearbox "pre-unit"

Yeah, I like info I have the ratio books, the factory service and the Haynes. Sometimes just a picture from a different angle helps you sort it

Last edited by DAMadd; 06/30/22 4:33 pm.

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If you are referring to "Unit engine" it means the gearbox is cast as part of the engine. GoldStars were separate construction with a frame holding the gearbox and engine together.

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OK, now that makes perfect sense.

Got a parts list now and I'm headed back to the hangar to see if I can find anything more.


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Happy 4th of July!

While I'm waiting for parts to arrive I am attending to all the lubrication issues for a bike as severely dried out as this one. A thing I saw in the shop manual for the AAU referred to a dry lubrication permanently applied to the cam spindle. I've searched the forum to find any discussion about this but have found very little. So I'm wondering what all of you would say about this. Should I leave this alone? I haven't messed with anything under the timing cover yet.


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Don't remove the AAU unless you really need to. The AAU is not keyed in place to assure correct position. It can be a real pain getting it re-positioned correctly. If you do need to remove it, the Rupert Ratio book has some very good instructions. You don't need a special tool for the job. My 69 441 VS had a thoroughly worn out and partially broken, AAU. Fortunately, Peter Quick at BSA Unit Singles had an NOS AAU that worked perfectly. After fighting with it, I finally took it to Beno Rodi and he timed it for me. I love my 441 VS.


Current Bike: 1968 Triumph Bonneville T120R, 1969 BSA Victor Special, 1975 Norton 850 Commando John Player, M1030M1 U.S.M.C. Diesel
Previous British Bikes: 1968 BSA Lightning, 1969 BSA Lightning, 1969 BSA Firebird Scrambler, 1972 BSA B50 Gold Star, 1974 Triumph Trident
Previous Non-British Bikes: 1983 BMW R80RT
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