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kommando #872256 02/16/22 10:29 pm
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Originally Posted by kommando
The casting surface is as original behind the stamps, so regardless of when it was stamped ie at the factory or at a dealer the current numbers are the first numbers stamped. So very extremely unlikely to have be parted out from a stolen bike and then restamped.


After filing the area flat, use some coarse emery and hammer it onto the surface,
you wouldn't be able to tell the difference between that and the original finish.
You may have to scrub the area with dirty kero and wire brush etc.
Then just stamp whatever number you want, don't be too neat as the factory wasn't
and don't hold the stamps too square or it'll look too good.
OR just run a weld across the number and say the case was cracked.
If it was a Brough i may worry but these things were mass produced like sausages,
who cares?

BSA on eBay
NickL #872296 02/17/22 9:10 am
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Originally Posted by NickL
Originally Posted by kommando
The casting surface is as original behind the stamps, so regardless of when it was stamped ie at the factory or at a dealer the current numbers are the first numbers stamped. So very extremely unlikely to have be parted out from a stolen bike and then restamped.


After filing the area flat, use some coarse emery and hammer it onto the surface,
you wouldn't be able to tell the difference between that and the original finish.
You may have to scrub the area with dirty kero and wire brush etc.
Then just stamp whatever number you want, don't be too neat as the factory wasn't
and don't hold the stamps too square or it'll look too good.
OR just run a weld across the number and say the case was cracked.
If it was a Brough i may worry but these things were mass produced like sausages,
who cares?

Yes but I was not going to mention that wink . Plus it does need some skill and technique to do it properly or it just looks too uniform.

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kommando #872301 02/17/22 10:53 am
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Originally Posted by kommando
Originally Posted by NickL
Originally Posted by kommando
The casting surface is as original behind the stamps, so regardless of when it was stamped ie at the factory or at a dealer the current numbers are the first numbers stamped. So very extremely unlikely to have be parted out from a stolen bike and then restamped.


After filing the area flat, use some coarse emery and hammer it onto the surface,
you wouldn't be able to tell the difference between that and the original finish.
You may have to scrub the area with dirty kero and wire brush etc.
Then just stamp whatever number you want, don't be too neat as the factory wasn't
and don't hold the stamps too square or it'll look too good.
OR just run a weld across the number and say the case was cracked.
If it was a Brough i may worry but these things were mass produced like sausages,
who cares?

Yes but I was not going to mention that wink . Plus it does need some skill and technique to do it properly or it just looks too uniform.

Indeed, and that stamping surface isn't milled flat like the later bikes. I doubt you could succesfully bodge it.

Though to find a set of decent 70-on cases that hasn't been buggered about with is pretty scarce. Im on the look out for just that and a set of 67 spitfire cases (which someone hasn't decided to polish to a mirror shine) is pretty tough too.


Now let’s all have a beer beerchug

68’ A65 Lightning “clubman”
71’ A65 823 Thunderbolt (now rebuilt)
67’ D10 sportsman (undergoing restoration)
68’ D14 trials (undergoing transformation)

Bustednukel #872614 02/20/22 11:20 pm
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Different views and takes on this stuff by various people but iv'e always
thought that what made any of these old crates rare or different was
what tuners and blokes did with the standard factory turned out mostly
junk of the day, not what bloody number was stamped on the cases.
All the cases were the same over all the models anyway, it's not as if
the spitfire had special strengthened features or the lightning clubman
had facility for fuel injection, they were the same as the others with the
exception of the head and/or gearbox cluster, maybe a set of pistons
and carbs. All the stuff was available for anyone to bolt on if they wanted.

3 members like this: pushrod tom, KevRasen, JER.Hill
NickL #872649 02/21/22 2:50 pm
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Originally Posted by NickL
Different views and takes on this stuff by various people but iv'e always
thought that what made any of these old crates rare or different was
what tuners and blokes did with the standard factory turned out mostly
junk of the day, not what bloody number was stamped on the cases.
All the cases were the same over all the models anyway, it's not as if
the spitfire had special strengthened features or the lightning clubman
had facility for fuel injection, they were the same as the others with the
exception of the head and/or gearbox cluster, maybe a set of pistons
and carbs. All the stuff was available for anyone to bolt on if they wanted.

My interest in vintage machines is not like that at all. I've never seen a 1920 'whatever' done that way. Everyone has their own interest in 'mechanicing' these vintage machines the way they like 'em. When I want to modify a bike, I go to the 'dark side' and work on the HD tracker that I ride.


1967 BSA Wasp
1967 BSA Hornet (West Coast Model)
1967 BSA Hornet (East Coast Model)
1968 BSA Firebird Scrambler
1968 BSA Spitfire Mark IV
1965 BSA Cyclone Competition Build
1965 BSA Spitfire Hornet Build
NickL #872653 02/21/22 3:05 pm
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Originally Posted by NickL
Different views and takes on this stuff by various people but iv'e always
thought that what made any of these old crates rare or different was
what tuners and blokes did with the standard factory turned out mostly
junk of the day, not what bloody number was stamped on the cases.
All the cases were the same over all the models anyway, it's not as if
the spitfire had special strengthened features or the lightning clubman
had facility for fuel injection, they were the same as the others with the
exception of the head and/or gearbox cluster, maybe a set of pistons
and carbs. All the stuff was available for anyone to bolt on if they wanted.

Its more about its resale value than its actual worth. though essentially I agree with you.

If im building "something a bit different" i don't really care what the numbers are, I try and look for 70-on cases and thats it. If I am doing something like a spitfire (which would command more money than a thunderbolt) then even if I put a different crank etc inside then I will try and get cases of the right year and designation, even if the numbers don't match.


Now let’s all have a beer beerchug

68’ A65 Lightning “clubman”
71’ A65 823 Thunderbolt (now rebuilt)
67’ D10 sportsman (undergoing restoration)
68’ D14 trials (undergoing transformation)

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Seeing the "piled arms" stamp under the "Lightning" serial number in Gary's picture kills my theory that it signified "race shop" or other high performance work, as it might have been for "Spitfire' models.

I still wonder why it is on those cases?

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Originally Posted by Irish Swede
Seeing the "piled arms" stamp under the "Lightning" serial number in Gary's picture kills my theory that it signified "race shop" or other high performance work, as it might have been for "Spitfire' models.

I still wonder why it is on those cases?

Im not ruling out anything, least not till the limiting days that we can speak with some one that might have known. For all we know they could be engines that went back to the factory due to a fault, or had been re-worked. - who knows.


Now let’s all have a beer beerchug

68’ A65 Lightning “clubman”
71’ A65 823 Thunderbolt (now rebuilt)
67’ D10 sportsman (undergoing restoration)
68’ D14 trials (undergoing transformation)

Allan G #872665 02/21/22 5:03 pm
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Originally Posted by Allan G
Im not ruling out anything, least not till the limiting days that we can speak with some one that might have known. For all we know they could be engines that went back to the factory due to a fault, or had been re-worked. - who knows.

I've got a lot of images of cases with that little stamp. That's an awful lot of fault or re-worked engines.


1967 BSA Wasp
1967 BSA Hornet (West Coast Model)
1967 BSA Hornet (East Coast Model)
1968 BSA Firebird Scrambler
1968 BSA Spitfire Mark IV
1965 BSA Cyclone Competition Build
1965 BSA Spitfire Hornet Build
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There were a lot of duff engines
Down here a BSA stamp under the engine number was a service replacement engine or an engine that had a warranty service done


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Bustednukel #874814 03/18/22 12:50 am
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I should have taken a photo of my first a65 race engine around 1990, that was
a set of new late blank new cases, as the coppers were always sniffing
around sidecars at race meetings i stamped them myself. NICK'S A65
no-one ever picked up on it. The engine was sold like that and was probably
road registered with that number.

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BEcause we have no log books that track the history of a bike . it was very common to simply add another stamp between the model number & the serial number
This was enough to rebirth a stolen motorcycle
I some times think a lot of Australial laws were made for the benefit of thieves .


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Breakers/wrecker yards in the UK used to be full of old crashed bikes,
most of my pre unit triumph stuff when i used one racing came from them.
Very often you could pick ones that were in very good condition, many
were backwards and forwards to work type bikes and had low mileage.
Plus if you add up the amount of tritons, tribsa's, norbsa's etc kicking
about, keeping track was hopeless. Most wreckers would sell you a frame
and log book so you just left the frame behind if you didn't want it.
Coppers were normally more interested in nicking you for speeding or
something like that as anything else was too much trouble unless they
were specifically tasked with the job like the ones who used to ferret
around race meetings.

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