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Yesterday I changed oil on my '60 Gold Star at the 100 mile-mark after a total engine rebuild, and I mean TOTAL (all bearings, crank, piston, rod, valves, guides and so on). There was no debris to speak of, just a little dust-like residue at the bottom of the oil tank and no discernible amount on the plate at the bottom of the crankcase. Once all of the hot oil drained from the tank, I cleaned it out thoroughly and removed all of the greyish residue at the bottom leaving nothing but a nice metal surface. I used Valvoline 20W50 motorcycle mineral oil for the engine and 10W40 for the primary which I also drained with similar results. I'm pleased by the outcome of this first critical oil change which some might think was done prematurely but Gold Star engines being rather precious commodities I rather err on the side of caution. The next change won't come until I've done 500 miles and that may well be a couple of years. So, my big question is: should I install an external spin-on oil filtering kit? Under my ownership the bike will never see hard use or change intervals beyond 500 miles. I'd, of course, feel better if it had a filter to trap all those miniscule particles but with frequent fresh oil changes (doesn't oil hold impurities in suspension or is that another myth?) such I practice, is it necessary? And, finally, are there sources for such oil filter kits in the US for our GS? I've seen them for Nortons and other marques but not for Gold Stars.
Thanks in advance for your comments and advice.
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Though about this a lot for my own bike a few years ago.

Generalising, oils made to modern standards have a detergent component which keeps the inside of the engine clean by holding impurities in suspension. Oils made specifically for older engines do not.

So, the implication is that modern oils, offering much better protection are great for our old things...except all those impurities floating around between changes...enter the after-market filter kits. Briefly, if you want to run a modern detergent oil you should run a proper filter: the only realistic way of adding this is an after-market offering somewhere in the return line.

To answer the question: the only kit I am aware of for the BSA's is produced by a member of the UK GSOC and takes a 70's Triumph Trident filter element. It's longer skinny thing than the common spin-on generic types. Even then, the long skinny version is really a generic thing, where the kit comes with fittings to allow it to be fitted to the return line.


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i use these on all my old bikes they are small , 2"x3" deep . so can be fitted where you want them . On my gold star i did fit an uprated pump , absaf , but the original would do the same job . https://www.morgo.co.uk/product-category/morgo-oil-filter-kit/

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I have the MAP filter on my GS. It uses the Trident filter like the UK kit. I use the same filter on all of my bikes, so I only need to keep one filter type on hand.

I mounted the filter on the RH pillion peg bracket using the boss for the rear set mount (bike has std. pegs). Cap face to the rear making for easy filter change and I can completely drain the filter housing.

It hides fairly well in that location


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RicLand Offline OP
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Thanks to all who've answered. Alas, being a newby to the vintage Brit bike world I really need specific--if at all possible with links or pics--recommendations. For example, RICH B, what exactly is the MAP filter that you use on all of your bikes and which makes eminent sense to me and where do you buy it? I notice you're in OH.
Again, grateful for your helpful advice.

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Thx Rich. I checked but they're out of stock (temporarily, I hope) so I'll wait since the riding season is just about over in this part of Colorado.

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Without turning this into an oil thread, consider adding 2 oz. of something like Lucas TB Zinc-Plus per quart of Valvoline VR1. VR1 has a higher zinc content than most oils, but that amount of Zinc-Plus brings it up to levels that oils of the '50s and '60s had. That will benefit the surfaces of the valve train that rub against each other.

p.s. to add some data to this, VR1 has 1400 ppm zinc, and 2 oz/qt. of Zinc-Plus boosts that to 1900 ppm. You should do your own research, but my conclusion was that somewhere around 2000 was a good value for an old pushrod engine like a Gold Star's.

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Look for the filter BSA and Triumph used on the 1971-72 250cc bikes.
It's small, a canister type with disposable cartridge filter inside.
The filter cartridges are available on EBAY all the time.

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Just from an objective point of view, and not being the owner of a GS engine (although I do own three other BSAs that, put together, might add up to a GS), I can't see that a bike that's going to have its oil changed every 500 miles would benefit at all from a filter. In that case, it would just be another point of potential leaking or failure and from that standpoint might be worse than not having one.

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Hi can anyone help i am looking for a rrt2 sleeve gear in good condition .
Thanks rocketgolie.

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RicLand Offline OP
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There is an additional consideration in the installation of an oil filter that might, just might, carry a negative impact. And that is the loss, slight though it may be, of some oil pressure as the oil goes through the filtering system, whichever one is installed. I'm still on the fence given my inclination to change oil every 500 miles or every 100 hours as a friend recommends. All that being said, the MAP or Triumph/BSA small tubular canister type look like the bees knees. MAP (out of stock at the moment) sells theirs for $120 and TRI-COR for $215 and I frankly can't tell the difference. Finally, I'd also hate to give up my nice, original looking steel clad oil lines from the oil tank to the crankcase--rubber lines for hot oil make me uneasy. Decisions, decisions, decisions.

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The steel lines are for protection of the rubber hose underneath. Modern "rubber" lines are fine for hot oil.

The filter goes after the engine and before the oil tank. You will lose no "pressure". With a GS, you get the added benefit that the oil going to the rockers gets filtered before starting the journey to the top end.


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