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In my latest quandary, I’ve noticed it’s hard to be specific about a certain type front brake. In this case, the A65 “one sided” ‘67 front brake. I know they were used on earlier year bikes, and there are tons of “one sided” brakes, so that term is not very defining. It seems you have to spell out the bike you have seen one on to try and communicate what you are talking about. Of course if the other person doesn’t know the models very well, it can lead to mistaken I.D.
I was wondering if the brakes had a manufacturer aside from BSA. Like the Carbs for example: AMAL, Concentric, or DunLop WM-2. Did BSA actually make the brakes, or source them from some other Mfr ?


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Qualcast were a midlands company who certainly did cast hubs for Triumph.
They may have made the cylinders or heads/cases?
I didn't believe that Triumph or BSA actually cast anything in the later days?

Same as the Nissan and Toyota or Ford factories today buy in components made to their spec?

https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/term/BIOG235855

Qualcast is best known for lawn mowers but the name is an amalgamation of "quality castings"

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I think most of the conical brake plates were made in Italy.

Most car plants are assembly shops these days, the parent company may have one
or two huge plants for mass manufacturing of multi use item but local assembly is
what goes on mainly.

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Pressed steel backing plate brakes were made in house
Some alloy ones were bought is and some were made
Drums , hubs cams & levers were usually made in house
Remember BSA was a massive company and owned several foundries so while they bought in barrels from Ixion Foundries, they owned Ixion
So left pocket right pocket sort of stuff that tax dodging accountants love

I would imagine that the shoes would have been bough it
In either the Lightning & Thunderbolts book or the Slumberglades book ( perhaps both ) was a mention that the comical hubs were bought in fro Italy and were wrong so had to be made in house at least for the initial production run.

Usually a bought in replacement was a short term solution to production scheduling like the plunger A series clutch and is fairly obvious different from the normal in house product .
As the dividend seekers became dominant on the boards then some component divisions got sold off in order to make the books appear to be getting a better return on capital .
This is when a manufacturing company is in it's end cycle with the ultimate transition to nothing more than a brand name on some one elses product


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Thanks for the notes.
I guess my purpose for the query was to have a common name that would I.D. a brake. That isn't going to be the case I see. Oh well, if the fellow listening doesn't know what "for example a '67 front brake" means, then I guess it's time to find someone that does!


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KC,

Do you mean just the brake shoes and pads?


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If you check the catalogues usually there were a variety of brakes fitted in any one season.
BSA brakes are generally described by the diameter , width & type
Things like Goldies & Spitfires generally got a better brake for a few seasons which eventually found it's way to the standard models.
USA bikes often had the bigger brakes before the UK or general export bikes did
And this is excluding supply problems where wrong brakes got fitted because the right wheels were not available.
Apparently these sorts of problems were very common in the pre Alister Cave days and never really fully overcome
You had to wait till the 1971 OIF bikes till the entire range got the same brake & even then the trials had a smaller one .


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Originally Posted by BSA_WM20
If you check the catalogues usually there were a variety of brakes fitted in any one season.
BSA brakes are generally described by the diameter , width & type
Things like Goldies & Spitfires generally got a better brake for a few seasons which eventually found it's way to the standard models.
USA bikes often had the bigger brakes before the UK or general export bikes did
And this is excluding supply problems where wrong brakes got fitted because the right wheels were not available.
Apparently these sorts of problems were very common in the pre Alister Cave days and never really fully overcome
You had to wait till the 1971 OIF bikes till the entire range got the same brake & even then the trials had a smaller one .

Exactly! That’s the reason it would be great to have a name or Mfr to reference. I used the ‘67 as an example in the post since the front is limited to only 2 choices, and saying “single side” is fairly fool proof. On other years, it gets dicey!
1968: possibly the 180mm, the new TLS on a Lightning, the old “single side” on a T-Bolt.
I’m beating this to death, and it’s not worth it. There are not Names, code no.s, Mfrs, to reference. Can’t say Girling shock, Dunlop rim, etc., only describe where you saw the thing,……. Which in itself is unreliable. It was just a question.


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KC, it's been a while since I sourced front shoes for either of my A65s ('66 and '67, both the same), but when I did, British Cycle Supply knew exactly what I needed and got me the right stuff.

I don't know what they mean by "one sided", but I do know that, unlike the rear shoes, the fronts are not symmetrical; that is, the linings are offset with respect to the pivot points. Or maybe they just mean "single leading shoe".

Also note that, in 1967, the Spitfire had a larger front brake than the Lightning and Thunderbolt (9-inch vs. 8-inch I believe).


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Originally Posted by Mark Z
KC, it's been a while since I sourced front shoes for either of my A65s ('66 and '67, both the same), but when I did, British Cycle Supply knew exactly what I needed and got me the right stuff.

I don't know what they mean by "one sided", but I do know that, unlike the rear shoes, the fronts are not symmetrical; that is, the linings are offset with respect to the pivot points. Or maybe they just mean "single leading shoe".

Also note that, in 1967, the Spitfire had a larger front brake than the Lightning and Thunderbolt (9-inch vs. 8-inch I believe).

Didn't the Spitfire have the 190mm brake?

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Originally Posted by DJinCA
Originally Posted by Mark Z
KC, it's been a while since I sourced front shoes for either of my A65s ('66 and '67, both the same), but when I did, British Cycle Supply knew exactly what I needed and got me the right stuff.

I don't know what they mean by "one sided", but I do know that, unlike the rear shoes, the fronts are not symmetrical; that is, the linings are offset with respect to the pivot points. Or maybe they just mean "single leading shoe".

Also note that, in 1967, the Spitfire had a larger front brake than the Lightning and Thunderbolt (9-inch vs. 8-inch I believe).

Didn't the Spitfire have the 190mm brake?

DJinCA

Yup. Which is more like 7.5”, but it was also a much wider shoe.


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Guys, I’m kinda done with this, but was talking about the brake as a whole unit, The Brake. Too bad you can’t just say: The Bendix, The Lockheed, The Acme, The Whatzit, brake. yes the shoes are in it somewhere…. The answer to my query is a simple …. No. Aside from a photo, the confusion describing what I mean to someone else will remain.
OH, I see my typo!! There is NO 9 inch brake! Hah!


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It's not that simple

The hubs were cast, then machined.
The casting could have been cast elsewhere and supplied machined, or machined at the factory from supplied castings.

The brake hub could have been a plate or a casting and the above still stands.

Only when disc brakes came in can you say "Lockheed" or "Brembo"


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