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Richrd
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The B44 GP had oil in the frame plus a small tank.

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Ha, Ha. Admit I am somewhat challenged with pictures here but can email pretty good. For those who care, [email protected]

PS also, A-10

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Originally Posted by pushrod tom
Ha, Ha. Admit I am somewhat challenged with pictures here but can email pretty good. For those who care, [email protected]

PS also, A-10


If you want you can send me photos ( [email protected]) and I can post them for you......can put them on your "for sale" thread too? We're here to help each other and I don't mind at all.

I'd LOVE to add another unit single to the herd but that's not going to happen.......a man needs to know his limits.

Gordon in NC


Gordon Gray in NC, USA.........as Lannis says “Gordon is either all in or all out.....there’s no in between”
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Originally Posted by Stuart Kirk
Originally Posted by BAinLA
.....OK then I stand corrected about the CR. Somewhere I got the idea that I had the 11-1 engine.....
Not so fast, you could actually have had that.

If it was a 1966 B44E without the compression plate, it was 11.4 to 1. If you had a B44GP, that was 11.4 to 1 also. Did any of them have oil in the frame?

From the 1967 B44EA onward, there isn't a compression plate listed and afaik, they are all 9.4 to 1.

It was a '66 I believe but I don't recall at all the oil reservoir location. If I had to guess, I would say it had a tank. In any case it rocked. I never raced my brother's hopped up Suzuki X-6 Hustler but I am sure it would have beat it (plus he was a big guy).


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Originally Posted by Gary Caines
Yeah, I have the cravings too. Back in 1972 I bought a used B50 that had been crashed for $180.00. I bought it from a guy's mother. He son was in bad shape. Bent front forks and really bent frame. Engine and gearbox were undamaged. I bought a new frame from a local BSA dealer that was stripping new bikes down for parts to sell since he couldn't get new parts from BSA. The frame was from a 250, which was the same. I switched frames and beat on the front forks with a sledge hammer to straighten them. I rode that bike for 2 - 3 years. It was fantastic to ride. Unbelievable torque. I hated the OIF though. That thing could be scary to start. You never knew when it was going to kick back. I remember one particularly bad handstand followed by a landing in a trash can. There was something about the size of the bike and the way it felt and sounded while riding that I never got over. At the time I had other BSA A65s but I preferred to ride the B50 unless it was a long trip. I recently broke down and bought a 1969 441 VS and am in the process of getting it reliable. It only has a little over 5,000 original miles but hadn't been started since 2005. The PO kept it in their living room. I now have it running, but no matter what I do I can't start it with a kick. It starts right up and runs and idles very well when rolling it down a hill. Very frustrating. I think it may be the timing.
I've had three 441 Victors during the early to late 70s but I don't remember ever having a problem kick-starting one. I would file the points if they needed it and set the timing with a stick I made (to be inserted into the spark plug hole) with a line on it for the distance BTDC. Have you checked your compression?


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Originally Posted by pushrod tom
I have a lovely 441SS for sale!


pushrod tom has established a good reputation on here.........this is a very nice example of a useable unit single.





Gordon in NC

BSA 1.jpg BSA2.jpg

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Originally Posted by Gordon Gray
Originally Posted by pushrod tom
I have a lovely 441SS for sale!


pushrod tom has established a good reputation on here.........this is a very nice example of a useable unit single.





Gordon in NC

That's a very nice bike indeed. However I've always liked the "down-and-dirty" look of a Victor. I would settle for this one';

BSA 441 1966 .JPEG

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Downest and dirtiest right there... a 66 Victor Enduro. Each year after they became more Metrosexual.

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Way too much power for that tiny little C15 rear drive chain. 11.4 to 1 and ET ignition, kickstart at your peril. What more could you want?

The later ones did mellow out a lot.

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Originally Posted by Stuart Kirk
Way too much power for that tiny little C15 rear drive chain. 11.4 to 1 and ET ignition, kickstart at your peril. What more could you want?

The later ones did mellow out a lot.


Sigh! The 1966 B44 Enduro NEVER came with 11.4:1 compression. It was always 9.4:1. As best I can tell the first few hundred produced came with a B44GP length cylinder and then a decompression spacer was added to come up with 9.4:1 compression. This is because at first they used the same cylinder casting as the B44GP and then modified the compression with the plate. These shorter cylinders were always sand cast items. But then during the same 1966 model year BSA started casting longer cylinders and no plate was added. Makes sense to eliminate the plate and fuss assembling the motors. All the B44 Enduros came with longer push rods needed when the spacer was added. Now folks get confused looking at the spares books and see the decompression plate in the picture and think their bike is missing it. So yes one could remove the plate in the earliest models but then they would have to shorten their push rods also. This can even be done on later square barrel motors if more compression is desired. One just has to mill of a bit on the bottom of the alloy cylinder to do it. But just because one can do it does not mean that is how the early 1966 B44s were sold.

One can buy a heavy duty 428 MX chain that is as strong as a standard 520 chain. The B44GP came with a 428 chain with its higher compression and more powerful motor. Since it was a competition bike it was likely assumed that a serious competitor would change the chain quite often before it would inevitably break.

Lastly, The later B44 did gain a bit of weight and did get a more restrictive silencer which could have slowed them down a bit, but the heads were better designed and flowed better and are proven to be able to produce more power than the round barrel heads. It wouldn't take too much effort to make any B44 peppier for the determined. But the best way to make one quicker is to gear it correctly for what you want to use it for, put a lighter rider on it laughing and make sure the top end is fresh.

Peter


check out: www.bsaunitsingles.com
2500 BSA part numbers with inventory in stock just for the unit singles!
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Thank you for the clarification Peter, I've long wondered just what the actual deal was on the 66. I've heard a lot of "explanations", yours makes the most sense, and kinda reinforces what I've heard.

But didn't they, at one time, advertise the bike with the 11:1 compression?

Edit- according to the BSA 66 VE promo page on your website, bike came with 9.5:1 CR, 11.4:1 with base plate removed... evidently an early or pre-production page?

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Originally Posted by Peter Quick
Originally Posted by Stuart Kirk
Way too much power for that tiny little C15 rear drive chain. 11.4 to 1 and ET ignition, kickstart at your peril. What more could you want?

The later ones did mellow out a lot.


Sigh! The 1966 B44 Enduro NEVER came with 11.4:1 compression. It was always 9.4:1. As best I can tell the first few hundred produced came with a B44GP length cylinder and then a decompression spacer was added to come up with 9.4:1 compression.

One can buy a heavy duty 428 MX chain that is as strong as a standard 520 chain. The B44GP came with a 428 chain

Lastly, The later B44 did gain a bit of weight and did get a more restrictive silencer which could have slowed them down a bit, but the heads were better designed and flowed better and are proven to be able to produce more power than the round barrel heads. It wouldn't take too much effort to make any B44 peppier for the determined. But the best way to make one quicker is to gear it correctly for what you want to use it for, put a lighter rider on it laughing and make sure the top end is fresh.

Peter
Hi Peter,
Thanks for weighing in with some hard facts for us all. My comments were based on my own seat of the pants experience of my mis-spent youth. Like the times I broke that 428 chain, or the various round barrel Victims I owned that would absolutely spank a square barrel bike. My old 1967 B44EA would show 225lbs on the compression gauge and was stock as far as I knew. And of course the "lemon juicer" muffler baffle was long gone.

It's not too hard to imagine that the squids of the day immediately removed that spacer, or had their barrel shortened to GP spec, 'cause that's what Jeff Smith had.

And yes, I agree the later intake port was without doubt better but still imho the later bikes just didn't seem to have the same enthusiastic approach to delivering the power. It makes me wonder if BSA's published compression ratios weren't that accurate and they fudged the actual number down on the later ones in the interests of longer life and easier starting. They wouldn't be the first manufacturer to do that. Maybe someday I'll cc a stock late one and find out.

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Quote
It makes me wonder if BSA's published compression ratios weren't that accurate and they fudged the actual number down on the later ones in the interests of longer life and easier starting.

No, the 9.4 compression stayed all the way to the end, confirmed by measuring barrels and pistons. Much more likely to be the silencer evolution. The first peanut silencers are straight through a perforated tube with a small outer chamber only beaten in silencing ineffectiveness by the B44GP reverse cone mega which dropped the perforated tube. Last silencer variation on the 70 was larger plus had a convoluted route.

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