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If the oil pump was disassembled, cleaned, and reassembled without any hint of drag on the gears (when turning the spindle by hand), you got lucky! Every one I ever tried to refresh and inspect always had a little drag after putting back together. I learned after the first couple of A65 engine overhauls that if the pump turns smoothly and the drive gear is not knackered, flush it with solvent and leave it together. The gears wear in a pattern, and essentially are "married" together. When the pump is reassembled, if the gears are not precisely fitted as they were originally, the result is a slight drag. I agonized about this on my first BSA engine overhaul, a 1970 A50, but just refitted the pump and never had an issue with it during the year I rode it as a daily rider, nor did the guy that bought it from me. The reproduction black-face gauges are available from us for around $150 for the pair.They are, by the way, a bit taller than the original Smith's instruments, so they stand a little proud in the binnacles.
-Dave


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Originally Posted by The Bonneville Shop
If the oil pump was disassembled, cleaned, and reassembled without any hint of drag on the gears (when turning the spindle by hand), you got lucky! Every one I ever tried to refresh and inspect always had a little drag after putting back together. I learned after the first couple of A65 engine overhauls that if the pump turns smoothly and the drive gear is not knackered, flush it with solvent and leave it together. The gears wear in a pattern, and essentially are "married" together. When the pump is reassembled, if the gears are not precisely fitted as they were originally, the result is a slight drag. I agonized about this on my first BSA engine overhaul, a 1970 A50, but just refitted the pump and never had an issue with it during the year I rode it as a daily rider, nor did the guy that bought it from me. -Dave

Yes Dave, I kind of hinted around at the same thing, but I didn't want to give Busted heartburn. I had the same experience with the first oil pump I took apart. It never turned again, after four or five attempts at reassembly, and I then had to toss it in the junk bin and replace it. (I still have that oil pump, circa 1973!)


Mark Z

'65(lower)/'66(upper, wheels, front end, controls)/'67(seat, exhaust, fuel tank, headlamp)/'70(frame) A65 Bitsa.
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I’ve found assembling them on a sheet of glass helps. The later pumps with dowels shouldn’t be so much an issue but if you can push all 3 components flat against a glass plate then carefully torque the bolts up, I’ve found I’ve not had an issue. I haven’t had to flatten any end plates as yet so I’m not sure how much drag if any the gears will have against the end plate.

I’m a big advocate of sonic baths for cleaning engine components, I’ve even returned AAU units that were jammed tight into good serviceable condition with just the sonic bath.


Now let’s all have a beer beerchug

68’ A65 Lightning “clubman”
71’ A65 823 Thunderbolt (now rebuilt)
67’ D10 sportsman (undergoing restoration)
68’ D14 trials (undergoing transformation)

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Well, Dave, yes there was a drag on the pump when disassembled, inspected and cleaned. Thought maybe might have to get another. Disassembled again and flipped over one of the gears, reassembled and still drag, Disassembled a third time and flipped the last gear that could be flipped, still drag. Disassembled a 4th time and rotated one gear 180 degrees and voila, spins free.

Might still buy a new pump. The worm gear has a fork on the end to drive the tach and one fork is missing. Thought it might have been original to have only one fork. Cleaned up lots of bits and bolts and found what might be the piece that exits the gearcase to drive the tach; it seems long but has a configuration that seems like it will fit. My basket bike A65L is stored in a residential basement about 10 miles away. Have also happily discovered the cam gear nut which may be the last part missing for both the drive side and the timing side internals besides washers. I have yet to split the cases; the end thrust on the crank feels good. The bottom of the case is missing the screen mesh cover; but, am hoping for good news once the cases are split. Found my valve spring compressor in the very last place I could remember where it was, and will disassemble the head which is on the bench. Found a stud in the basket with pulled aluminum and it matches the striped hole ln the head for the valve cover. I still have the helicoil kit I bought in Denver to fix a similar situation on a Norton Atlas I drove cross country in the 70s. Might work on the BSA. If not then a weld shop can fill the hole and I'll tap it. So, back to the oil pump worm gear and its lack of a proper fork....might find a proper worm gear with the right fork. But if the basket case motor turns into a no rev in anger type, then the tach might just be plated up and forgotten as I granny shift around town and stay off the interstate. Found a used trans countershaft bearing in the basket and wondered what it was. Figured it out: The trans is in the case and rotates fine but the nuts are missing to hold it into the case. Need a slim jaw puller to get the clutch off the input shaft and key. Hopefully a new counter shaft bearing is in there and all the rest of the trans is 100%. Hope all the drive and timing and crank bushes are good too. LOL.!!!

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You want a certain amount of drag to show the clearances are correct, the test on a Norton pump is to put a spanner on the nut and then at 2 inches away from the nut a single finger on the spanner should be able to turn the pump. The drag should be consistent through 360 degrees.

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Clutch centering hub is stuck on the main shaft. Did not really need a slim jaw puller, but a normal little 2 jaw puller fit right on it. Put enough tension on the hub to pop it but no go. Rechecked the workshop manual and not much is said if anything. Thought maybe a 3 jaw puller might do better. Saw a used main shaft on ebay and noted that the hub is keyed to a taper near the end of the shaft. Will pretension the hub with the 2 jaw puller and add some heat with a heat gun or a torch if need be. Should pop off. Probably been on there for 50 years.

Got the rear wheel off and the brake shoes look almost new. Gave a tug on the speedo angle drive but attached to the hub in a way as yet undiscovered. Also, got the front fork off and disassembled.

Tried to post a pic, but...

Since this bike is OIF hot tanking the frame might be a bad idea. Any recommendations for a chemical brush on stripper for paint and rust?

The bolt for the swing arm is also tight. tried tapping with a wooden dowel. Guess I need a bigger hammer and a steel flat nose punch.

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Another motivation to get a new oil pump is that a worn pump will cause the engine to wet-sump on sitting. Both of my A65s had this problem until I scrounged a cast iron pump from a '71 for my bitsa (and I had tried the other remedies like replacing the check ball and spring and lapping the seat). For the first time in 45 years, my bitsa does not wet-sump... at all, even after sitting all winter.

Cast iron BSA pumps being hard to come by, you may have to spring for an SRM pump.


Mark Z

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The main spine of the frame is pretty easy to clean internally with a bottle brush and pressure washer. Externally i used stripper and wire wheels for most of it.

The seized swinging arm spindle/ bolt. Do not use a steel punch you will bell out the end, if you must hit it,I certainly had to, use a brass intermediate sacrificial item. mine was so seized, it had never been lubricated, that it took a 10 lb hammer and lots of heating to break it free.

If it has greaze nipples/ zerks fitted, use them , if it doesnt have them, fit before going any further and get as much grease in there as you can.

Use an air hammer / socket wrench/ windy gun on the bolt end to try and get it turning, if the rubber seals are still present cut them off before attempting to use heat. In my case the steel dollies had seized to the bushes, instead of the dollies/ bobbins gliding against the bushes, the dollies rubbed steps into the spindle rendering it FUBAR. new spindles are still out there and not too expensive, beware the " rhymes with fossils" steel dollies, my replacements were oversize.If you can get NOS dollies, pay the extra.
If you fit new bushes, you may need a 1 inch reamer , the manual says no, but I certainly did, wouldnt go otherwize. given how medieval the extraction was , possibly / probably there was some co-lateral distortion..

I ended up replacing everything except the swinging arm. The new bushes were fitted with a stepped pusher and some long bits of screwed rod.
That was forty years ago, they have not worm much since then with regular greasing, at least once a year.
best of luck.
if you have the wheel spindle removed the speedo drive will pull right off the hub, a few love taps from a soft faced hammer should jar it free, it may be hung up on the drive tangs.


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Got the swing arm bolt out. Was careful not to mushroom the bolt. Got the speedo drive out with a nudge.

The drive side crank nut was laying in the basket. It has no raised circular portion past the flats and is unlike the input shaft nut which has a raised potion past the flats. Likely not an original crank nut?

My OIF A65L basket case was a jigsaw puzzle with front end and swing arm attached. Case stripped but un-split. Somwhat of a research project. Thanks all for your input!

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Originally Posted by Bustednukel
Got the swing arm bolt out. Was careful not to mushroom the bolt. Got the speedo drive out with a nudge.

The drive side crank nut was laying in the basket. It has no raised circular portion past the flats and is unlike the input shaft nut which has a raised potion past the flats. Likely not an original crank nut?

My OIF A65L basket case was a jigsaw puzzle with front end and swing arm attached. Case stripped but un-split. Somwhat of a research project. Thanks all for your input!

Only the center clutch nut is "shouldered" (raised part past the flats). If the nut in question threads onto the crank, then it's probably the crank nut.

Did we talk about getting a factory spares manual or finding one online? Looks like you're going to need one...


Mark Z

'65(lower)/'66(upper, wheels, front end, controls)/'67(seat, exhaust, fuel tank, headlamp)/'70(frame) A65 Bitsa.
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Thanks, Mark Z, for letting me know about a shoulder not existing on the drive side crank nut. Did get a service manual and found a parts list at BaxterCycle.com , WOW, what a resource!!!

Yikes! Being a BSA nimrod on da' loose with a basket OIF A65, I did what a nimrod does: saw what looks like the right stuff on CL and could not resist buying, same as how I got the basket case. To be fair to myself seasoned folks may have bought this item and that is an A65 head that is rebuilt with new oversize intake valves, new exhausts, new seats (!). The intakes are about .1" oversize and as big as you can stuff an oversize valve in since the spark plug hole is right there. I think the guides, springs and keepers are probably new too; can't imagine they are not but will verify by disassembly. Anyhow, on CL its easy to negotiate, and was thrilled to have a rebuilt head since my basket case head has one pulled stud for the valve cover. As I set the rebuilt head on the bench, a little panic hit me when I recalled that head gaskets changed dimensions at some point during A65 production. So, I slid the new head onto the jug; yup, snug but goes. OK, so put some more studs on and no go on the front 2 center studs; holes are too small. Plus the valve cover studs are smaller. So, as far as my basket rebuild, the rebuilt head is a storage item, clean enough for my sock drawer. Maybe another member might want it; trade for something I need or think I need. HaHa! Rebuilt head is a 68-701. Basket head is a 71-2202

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Day 2 of ownership back in July

[img]http://https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/51437493233/in/dateposted-public/[/img]

Hope the pic shows up. Joined Flickr today so I can post pics. NOPE

Try this:
My basket lightning

That didn't work either.

Guess I'll have to read the instructions.

Last edited by Bustednukel; 09/08/21 8:47 pm. Reason: Messin' with pics
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The early heads had 5/16 rear bolt holes and 1/4 rocker cover studs.
Just get an early rocker cover and drill out the rear bolt holes to 10mm if you want to use that head.

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A '71 twin carb head is 71-2309 (71-2307 for single carb).
He said front two centre stud holes were too small?

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Must be looking at the head backwards.........

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Yes, had it backwards. Its the rear 2 that are smaller.

Apparently, the casting numbers are not the same as the part number. My numbers on the heads were casting numbers.

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Originally Posted by Bustednukel
Day 2 of ownership back in July

[img]http://https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/51437493233/in/dateposted-public/[/img]

Hope the pic shows up. Joined Flickr today so I can post pics. NOPE

Try this:
My basket lightning

That didn't work either.

Guess I'll have to read the instructions.

One more whirl on posting a pic:

[img]http://https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/51437493233/in/photostream/[/img]
Another no go. I give up.

Last edited by Bustednukel; 09/09/21 11:32 pm.
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Figured it out: Copy and paste to a command line... BAM there she blows!

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/51437493233/in/photostream/

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The clutch centering hub is still stuck on the input shaft. I don't feel too bad about it being stuck there. Especially since a fellow named Angus D. Campbell has a video on Youtube about the primary side of an A70 and has a similar experience as myself, a total BSA nimrod. My case primary side was disassembled in a basket along with the detritus of decades of sitting in some warehouse, Just the clutch hub was still on the primary side. Campbell's video at one point shows doubts that he has the right methodology to pull the clutch hub as a complete assembly. and shines a light to find if machine threads are on the inside circumference of the lip of the hub where a special puller can be attached. I checked my hub this morning and of course the same threads are there, about 2 of them. Campbell pretensions the special puller, cautions there are only a few threads and whacks the puller end with a large hammer a couple times and the hub pops. Campbell's videos are fantastic!

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You need a link image to an file. Left mouse click on the picture in flickr, in the lower right there is a down arrow (download this photo). Click on that. When the picture comes up, select a size (medium is good), then right mouse click on the picture. A menu comes up. The forth line down is "Copy image link". Selelct that then in Britbike use the picture icon. It will bring up a window. Paste the image link there.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]

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You do need the proper puller for the clutch hub.
The outer timing cover looks to be earlier than '71. A '71 would have a 1/4" screw just below the shift shaft.
Also, by posting the way you did allows anyone to see any other pictures that you have in your photostream.

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You could become a premium member. Pay the dues and easily post your pictures
Good luck with your project. Your in right the place for lots of help

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DMadigan, givin' it a whirl:

[Linked Image]

Another no go; I think I did that once already. Will just indicate a copy to command line on my links until I upgrade.

Only opened flickr account to post BSA pics.. Also, I think flickr allows public and private access levels.

Liked your head shot! Nice threads! Had an Atlas in the 70's and stripped 'em. Machinst/welder redid the Atlas and made them beautiful again.

Will take a closer look at the maybe not a 71 cover.

Thanks, All!

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[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]

Thanks DMadigan. Got it!!! I figured if you could do it, I should be able to too!

This pic is the 68 head I picked up on CL with the oversize intake and new seats. Just realized that the exhausts are set back in the seats, bad rice! The guides are steel; never seen steel guides.

Am heading to the BSA Club of New England show next Sunday the 19th. Show is advertised on Britbike. Will tote the 68 head with me and hope to swap for 71 stuff I need like bars, front fender, and seat. Maybe a 71 72 tank.

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All the guides were iron until the oif models. Nothing wrong with iron guides, they work quite well. You also seldom find an issue with them. Most bronze guides I’ve dealt with have either been replaced or K-lined.


Now let’s all have a beer beerchug

68’ A65 Lightning “clubman”
71’ A65 823 Thunderbolt (now rebuilt)
67’ D10 sportsman (undergoing restoration)
68’ D14 trials (undergoing transformation)

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