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#856542 08/19/21 6:19 pm
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edunham Offline OP
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I would like to put a center stand on my B50. They didn't come with them, at least here in the USA, as far as I know, but the frame has lugs for one. I am under the impression that a center stand from another bike (T140?) will fit. Can anyone confirm? Thanks.

Ed from NJ

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Hi Ed,
I no longer have my B50--exchanged it for a T140D but------
There was a thread on this on B50.org some years ago---to which I contributed.
Basically you are correct--you use a T140 center stand.
However (and isn't there always a however?)------
----There are several lengths of center stands used on T140s (and 73/74 T120s).---you need the correct one.
---- The lugs on the B50 frame are much wider apart than on the T140.--so the center stand has to be cut in two and extension tubes welded in to widen the stand to match the frame.
I might still have some notes I made on the project---I will have a look to see if I can find them.

BTW--- the stand is shown in the parts book for UK models but I dont think they were ever fitted with center stands--even in UK.
At the time I searched UK parts suppliers for a "spare" center stand but could not find one.
Strange things were going on at BSA at that time!

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Hi Ed,
In searching for my notes I realize that I am confusing putting a center stand onto a B50 with putting a center stand onto a Triumph TR5T.
Need to look into it further!

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Ed---these are the only notes that I can currently locate--hope they help.

PART 2B
So---we now have center stand 83-2627 and have fitted it to our B50.
What is it like and how does it work?
I have gone back to my original detailed notes and this is the story they tell:
a) Rear tire 2” off the ground.
b) Bike goes on and off the stand very well and very easily.
c)The stand gives good balance. The bike rests on the stand and the front wheel. But with only light pressure on the rear of the seat the bike rests on the stand and the rear wheel.
d) Trial on level concrete floor of garage.
e)Tests carried out with tires as per:
Front: Dunlop K82 3.25 X 18 inflated to 28 psig.
Rear: Dunlop K82 3.50 X 18 inflated to 32 psig.

So the 83-2627 stand works well—what about the shorter stands?
The distance between the center of the contact patch of the front wheel and the contact point of the center stand when in the down position is 32”.
The wheel base of the bike I measured as 56”.
With the bike resting on the front wheel and the center stand any increased stand length will lift the rear wheel by a factor of 56/32 of the increased stand length. This is 1.75 times the increased stand length.
Conversely reducing the stand length will lower the rear wheel by 1.75 times the reduction in stand length.
So the stand lengths for 83-4615 and 83-7532 of 9 ¼” compared with the 10 1/8” of 83-2627 ( 7/8” shorter) will lower the rear wheel by 7/8” times 1.75 = 1 ½” approx.
So using these shorter stands will reduce the distance from the bottom of the rear tire to the ground from 2” by 1 ½” to ½”.
This might work but if the stand pivots wear a bit and/or the bike is parked on uneven ground it could well be that the rear tire is not lifted off the ground.
So the message seems to be—get a 83-2627 center stand if you can.
If you cant then weld a pad onto the bottom of a 9 ¼” long stand with the pad being at least 1/2” thick.
All this presumes that the long side handle on the 83-2627 center stand is removed completely.
At first sight this seems essential if you also want to retain a working side stand.
However it really is best if you have some form of side handle so that your boot can push on something when getting the bike on the stand.
I have found that a short straight piece of the original side handle just 1 ¾” long can be welded onto the bottom of the center stand in the recess just above the foot. This gives a peg which is useful for putting your boot on in order to get the bike on the stand and at the same time enables the side stand to also be used without the two stands hitting each other in operation.
However the length (1 ¾”) of the short side handle and its positioning on the center stand need to be just right. I would therefore recommend that each bike is individually measured to avoid stand clash rather than just taking the dimension that worked on my bike.
So hopefully you now have your B50 with operating side and center stands, with the latter adapted from a reasonably readily available stand originally designed for a Triumph/BSA twin.
HTH

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Sorry for duplication!

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P/N looks like 83 3170 (from Baxter cycle archives)

I believe its the same as the dry frame B25

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Originally Posted by Tridentman
Ed---these are the only notes that I can currently locate--hope they help.

PART 2B
So---we now have center stand 83-2627 and have fitted it to our B50.
What is it like and how does it work?
I have gone back to my original detailed notes and this is the story they tell:
a) Rear tire 2” off the ground.
b) Bike goes on and off the stand very well and very easily.
c)The stand gives good balance. The bike rests on the stand and the front wheel. But with only light pressure on the rear of the seat the bike rests on the stand and the rear wheel.
d) Trial on level concrete floor of garage.
e)Tests carried out with tires as per:
Front: Dunlop K82 3.25 X 18 inflated to 28 psig.
Rear: Dunlop K82 3.50 X 18 inflated to 32 psig.

So the 83-2627 stand works well—what about the shorter stands?
The distance between the center of the contact patch of the front wheel and the contact point of the center stand when in the down position is 32”.
The wheel base of the bike I measured as 56”.
With the bike resting on the front wheel and the center stand any increased stand length will lift the rear wheel by a factor of 56/32 of the increased stand length. This is 1.75 times the increased stand length.
Conversely reducing the stand length will lower the rear wheel by 1.75 times the reduction in stand length.
So the stand lengths for 83-4615 and 83-7532 of 9 ¼” compared with the 10 1/8” of 83-2627 ( 7/8” shorter) will lower the rear wheel by 7/8” times 1.75 = 1 ½” approx.
So using these shorter stands will reduce the distance from the bottom of the rear tire to the ground from 2” by 1 ½” to ½”.
This might work but if the stand pivots wear a bit and/or the bike is parked on uneven ground it could well be that the rear tire is not lifted off the ground.
So the message seems to be—get a 83-2627 center stand if you can.
If you cant then weld a pad onto the bottom of a 9 ¼” long stand with the pad being at least 1/2” thick.
All this presumes that the long side handle on the 83-2627 center stand is removed completely.
At first sight this seems essential if you also want to retain a working side stand.
However it really is best if you have some form of side handle so that your boot can push on something when getting the bike on the stand.
I have found that a short straight piece of the original side handle just 1 ¾” long can be welded onto the bottom of the center stand in the recess just above the foot. This gives a peg which is useful for putting your boot on in order to get the bike on the stand and at the same time enables the side stand to also be used without the two stands hitting each other in operation.
However the length (1 ¾”) of the short side handle and its positioning on the center stand need to be just right. I would therefore recommend that each bike is individually measured to avoid stand clash rather than just taking the dimension that worked on my bike.
So hopefully you now have your B50 with operating side and center stands, with the latter adapted from a reasonably readily available stand originally designed for a Triumph/BSA twin.
HTH

Hi Tridentman, I have removed the duplication.


Now let’s all have a beer beerchug

68’ A65 Lightning “clubman”
71’ A65 823 Thunderbolt (now rebuilt)
67’ D10 sportsman (undergoing restoration)
68’ D14 trials (undergoing transformation)

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The T120/A65 centre stand will fit. You need to cut off the usual foot lever and weld on a stump at the bottom of the stand as per the parts books. The one my friend and I did we drilled the stand so the peg section could be pushed through up to the shoulder that we machined. Then welded at both sides. It worked out really well.

The stump just helps to get the stand into position as it has no means of leverage. You could probably relocate the complete lever to the bottom of the stand, but we didn’t do this and I don’t know if you would have anything fouling when the stand was up etc.


Now let’s all have a beer beerchug

68’ A65 Lightning “clubman”
71’ A65 823 Thunderbolt (now rebuilt)
67’ D10 sportsman (undergoing restoration)
68’ D14 trials (undergoing transformation)

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Allan— thanks for removing the duplication— much appreciated.

However there were several T120/T140 center stands.
Some differed in their length ( from center of pivot bolt to tip of foot).
IME the 83-2627 with a length of 10 1/8” is the one to go for.
Others such as 83-4615 and 83-7532 are only 9 1/4” long and don’t really get the rear tire off the ground.
You can check out the models which they are from from the parts lists but the dimensions quoted are useful if you are searching through stands at a swap meet.
BTW— I measured up all the stands courtesy of British Cycle Supply who kindly allowed me to go through their stock when their US warehouse was still located in NJ.
HTH

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No worries Tridentman.

The one we fitted was the longer stands from the 71/72 bikes. I haven’t measured the distance under the tyre but as the bike is quite light it was never a concern.

But it did make me think what you wrote and I went to the garage just now and measured my 68 and 71 A65’s.

The 71’ I did the later triumph strengthening mods. The centre stand (new of Harris type) has the flat stops on like the later stands) rests against the support pieces I welded in. Which makes it easier
To get off the stand and should prevent it twisting. I have 2 1/2” under the back tyre to the floor. This bike also has the longer 71 shocks fitted.

The 68’ with its original stand etc has about 1/4-1/3” between the back tyre and the floor. It isn’t super easy to get the wheel out but it is possible and it is made easier with blocks under the stand.

Now I have taken these measurements I may go get one of those later T140 stands. It’ll make it easier to get the bike on and off the stand and still have plenty of clearance to remove the back wheel.

Tyres make a big difference to a bike as does shockabsorber length. Mine are standard ratio 4.00:18 rear tyres, a low profile tyre will give you more gap too. A MT43 off road tyre will give you less.

1195EC6C-F197-471E-8872-05F79366D862.jpeg D47CC2D0-33C8-4C73-8CC3-0CC017F402AB.jpeg
Last edited by Allan G; 08/21/21 7:01 pm.

Now let’s all have a beer beerchug

68’ A65 Lightning “clubman”
71’ A65 823 Thunderbolt (now rebuilt)
67’ D10 sportsman (undergoing restoration)
68’ D14 trials (undergoing transformation)

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I had a centre stand on my B40 engined B25 OIF that I owned about 12 years ago, which was built up from a wreck and spare parts.

If I remember correctly, I searched for a centre stand as the B25 OIF frame had lugs for it, and I managed to find one from Burton Bike Bits who suggested that one from a Triumph Adventurer TR5T OIF would fit.

I duly purchased one and it did fit, although whether it was a TR5T stand or from another bike, I don't remember, see pic below, that's the best pic I can find from all those years ago, it may even have been an original B25 stand.

DSCF0134 (2).JPG
Last edited by gunner; 08/25/21 7:58 pm.

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Peter Quick had the B50 stand in stock, so rather than muck about with welding (which I would have to pay someone else to do), I have ordered it, the spring and the nuts and bolts. Should have them by this weekend.

Ed from NJ

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