Britbike forum

Classic British SparesKlempf British PartsBaxter CycleBritBike Sponsor SteadfastCyclesThe Bonneville ShopLowbrow CustomsSRM EngineeringGirling Classic MotorcycleLucas Classic MotorcycleHepolite PistonsIndustrial tec supply

Upgrade your membership: Premium Membership Gold Membership


New Sponsor post
Cyber Monday Sale - 10% off at The Bonneville Shop
by The Bonneville Shop - 11/29/21 5:34 pm
New FAQ post
How to find my own threads?
by reverb - 11/20/21 3:55 pm
Manuals on DVD - Buy 4 for 3
All 4 DVD Manual
Member Spotlight
Tridentman
Tridentman
New Jersey USA
Posts: 5,789
Joined: February 2008
ShoutChat
Comment Guidelines: Do post respectful and insightful comments. Don't flame, hate, spam.
Top Posters(30 Days)
NickL 80
Rohan 73
Top Likes Received (30 Days)
Newest Members
old ion limey, muzz750, Motorcycles and Art, SteveDee, Gus_Carrero
11,924 Registered Users
Who's Online Now
5 members (76degree-triumph, Villiers, JER.Hill, quinten, MaaseyRacer), 22 guests, and 20 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 134 of 139 1 2 132 133 134 135 136 138 139
Joined: May 2019
Posts: 967
Likes: 357
C
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
C
Joined: May 2019
Posts: 967
Likes: 357
Sometimes my post are so cryptic…. even I don’t understand them.

Page 13 bottom left.

https://www.sunnen.com/userfiles/resources/sunnen-catalog-enginehoningequipment.pdf

2 members like this: Magnetoman, Stuart Kirk
British motorcycles on eBay
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 715
Likes: 248
S
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
S
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 715
Likes: 248
Originally Posted by Cyborg
Sometimes my post are so cryptic…
A worthy addition to a well equipped Sunnen honing rig. It makes a big difference in how secure the pin bush is held into the small end rod eye. Particularly on a longer stroke engine with a relatively small piston pin that is able to reach higher rpm's.

85x88 BSA singles quickly spring to mind, 86x85.5 Matchlesses less so, but a slightly lower revving 84x90 motor? Hmmm...still might be a good idea. An 84.5x112 engine, an absolute must.

1 member likes this: Magnetoman
Joined: May 2019
Posts: 967
Likes: 357
C
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
C
Joined: May 2019
Posts: 967
Likes: 357
Maybe he’s waiting to respond in the hopes that the urge will somehow dissipate?

1 member likes this: Magnetoman
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Originally Posted by Cyborg
Maybe he’s waiting to respond in the hopes that the urge will somehow dissipate?
Sorry, I've been tied up desperately searching for a full set of bushing expanders.

Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 715
Likes: 248
S
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
S
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 715
Likes: 248
Originally Posted by Cyborg
Maybe he’s waiting to respond in the hopes that the urge will somehow dissipate?
Or he's battling flash floods and has no time right now.

There's a reason I picked up on your comment. A California vintage engine specialist in La Crescenta reconditioned some Lincoln V12 rods for me a few years ago. I wasn't happy with the work and went to press out the thin wall pin bushes he installed along with some originals in some other rods. His pressed out easily. Not good. The factory installed ones were a right bear to move but did finally come out with difficulty. The specialist had omitted the bushing expander step among other missteps. I was glad I checked.

Joined: May 2019
Posts: 967
Likes: 357
C
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
C
Joined: May 2019
Posts: 967
Likes: 357
Originally Posted by Magnetoman
Originally Posted by Cyborg
Maybe he’s waiting to respond in the hopes that the urge will somehow dissipate?
Sorry, I've been tied up desperately searching for a full set of bushing expanders.

While I know that’s not true… at least it hasn’t been occupying all of your time, I thought it might be of interest. I’m assuming it would only be used on relatively thin wall bushings. I know we discussed the existence of this attachment in the past and the subject originally came up because I read an article written by John. I’m guessing there isn’t anything in your inventory that would benefit from this attachment. Everything has bushings that are press fit and walls that are thick enough to maintain the interference fit? Anyway…. in a discussion elsewhere (about sizing rod bushings), I mentioned that attachment and someone came up with the part number.

Last edited by Cyborg; 07/26/21 3:40 pm.
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Originally Posted by Stuart Kirk
Or he's battling flash floods and has no time right now.
Last year we set an all-time record for the least rainfall during the summer monsoon season (and for the full year). This month we set an all-time record for the most rainfall during July.

I'm just back from a week in New York to meet my new granddaughter. This, the child of the motorcycle-riding daughter. I gained a granddaughter, but lost a riding companion. Every silver lining has a cloud. Sigh...

As an aside, if you think there are only a half-dozen ways for people to wear masks incorrectly and put everyone around them at risk, you fail to credit the American public with inventiveness. I distracted myself by photographing the many variations I saw in the airports and on the planes, but eventually gave up because it was too depressing.

Anyway, with me back in town the Ariel is again at risk of having the leaky fitting de-leaked, and the shakedown rides initiated again.

1 member likes this: NYBSAGUY
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Barring a thermonuclear apocalypse, if you want information to be permanent it has to be on paper. The latest example of this is something that may (or may not) affect my Vincent rebuild thread. Hints have appeared for months about things that have been churning just below the surface, until yesterday when we learned the long-serving editor of the monthly magazine 'MPH', who is also webmaster of the VOC Forum, won't stand for re-election in the fall.

The machinations behind this are above my pay grade and/or below my interest level, but the aspect that may (or may not) affect me is it seems to be related to the apparent decision (or not) to move the Forum to new software which will (or will not) mean losing the wealth of information on the current Forum and starting from scratch. Until the smoke clears (which, I thought it had, which is why I started my BS thread last month) I've hit 'pause' on my rebuild thread. I haven't hit 'pause' on the rebuild, only on documenting it in readable fashion.

It takes a lot more time than some people may realize to write something in logical sequence and in grammatically-correct English, having reasonable sentence lengths with paragraph breaks in the right places, and with appropriate photographs that clearly illustrate points made in the text. However, even once that time has been spent, it then takes a non-negligible amount of additional time to get that material properly formatted for a specific web site. For example, Britbike requires typing codes before and after words to italicize them, while the VOC site is happy with Word's internal codes, although it messes up other things so it's not a simple cut/paste operation. There are other time-consuming issues as well. Just as the case with my Ariel thread, I have my Vincent thread in a Word document, but it's the time that a switch to different software may waste to re-upload and format everything that concerns me.

Unlike the web, once all the work of creation is done, it's only a matter of hitting 'print' and a paper document emerges that will live forever. At least, until a thermonuclear apocalypse. In contrast, even absent an air assault from N. Korea, anything (everything) written on the Internet is living on borrowed time.

1 member likes this: George Kaplan
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 715
Likes: 248
S
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
S
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 715
Likes: 248
Originally Posted by Magnetoman
.........For example, Britbike requires typing codes before and after words to italicize them, while the VOC site is happy with Word's internal codes.....
I spent some years as a purchasing manager which meant also maintaining and updating some Microsoft Excel spreadsheets, a repetitive job. A short time into it, absolutely dying from the drudgery, I automated most of the process using macros to seek out what I wanted changed and then change it. After that, a push of a button would iterate through 40 or more multi page spreadsheets and update them all for the coming month while I sat back and watched the screen go through gyrations, or shut off the monitor and go have coffee.

Microsoft word offers macros as well.

You are already probably aware of such things, and it might seem I'm trying to put one more task on your plate, but it could be an elegant solution to the present dilemma.

Last edited by Stuart Kirk; 08/11/21 11:17 pm. Reason: Thought of something else.
1 member likes this: Magnetoman
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 911
Likes: 204
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 911
Likes: 204
https://any2bb.com/

Output from pasted Word doc:
This is italicized and this is bold


1970 T120R - 'Anton'
1970 Commando - 'Bruno'
1967 T120R - 'Caesar'
1968 Lightning - 'Dora'
1 member likes this: Magnetoman
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Stuart, thanks for that, but the problem is much worse. This thread has 3333 posts. If two-thirds of those are mine, to start fresh would mean either me uploading ~2000 separate posts, plus the images in each of them after taking a lot of time to locate them (even though all are in the same directory, I didn't name them for easy rebuilding of the thread). Want to take bets on whether I would be willing to do that? Or, I could convert the ~400k words and images in the document into a massive pdf and upload it. If it didn't exceed the forum's file size, which I suspect it would. But, even then, a "dead" pdf isn't the same as a live thread, and losing all the posts but mine would remove a lot of information from proper context.

Porting it to another site would add another layer of complexity, since I would have to convert the []-style codes into different codes, hoping I didn't forget that I used some other than i, b, and u. Just one misplaced character can turn an entire document into italics, or bold, or... which then becomes a nightmare to locate the origin of the problem and correct it.

And Greek letters and math symbols aren't always happy being moved from one place to another. Although one might think Alt key codes are standardized, they're only semi-standardized. Just today I needed to enter a λ in Photoshop, but the Alt-955 code entered it as a ╗ (which it just did here as well). However, I could enter Alt-955 in Word and get a λ, then copy that into Photoshop (and here) and it appeared correctly. Also, when Morgan installs new versions of his software on the same site, some of the symbols change their meaning.

p.s. I haven't tried, but I'd be willing to bet that the site in Hugh's post would choke, if not bring down the entire internet, if fed a 400k Word document.

Last edited by Magnetoman; 08/11/21 11:47 pm.
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 715
Likes: 248
S
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
S
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 715
Likes: 248
Yes, nightmare stuff. You would need to plan for it from the very beginning and that's assuming one had any idea what future changes might be.

But why on earth would an organization that works to preserves old motorcycles not also want to preserve historical info on the website but instead consider losing it all due to a software change??

Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Originally Posted by Stuart Kirk
But why on earth would an organization that works to preserves old motorcycles ...
Don't think of it as a monolithic "organization," think of it as a group of volunteers, each with their own personality, motivations, and histories of interactions with each other.

Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 911
Likes: 204
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 911
Likes: 204
Here's a VBA macro from the Wally World folks.
https://easywdwforums.com/threads/convert-word-to-bbcode.30256/
That should do your 400K doc, and in the privacy of your own home.


1970 T120R - 'Anton'
1970 Commando - 'Bruno'
1967 T120R - 'Caesar'
1968 Lightning - 'Dora'
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Originally Posted by Hugh Jörgen
Here's a VBA macro
That wouldn't solve the problem if I had to port another 400k thread here, because there's a 5-photo limit per post. The italics might be converted automatically, but I'd still have to individually upload ~2000 separate posts, each with 5 images.

Stepping back from the trees for a moment, the forest is the overall difficulty -- actually, practical impossibility -- of moving a 2000 post thread to a different site. Or, if it was deleted from this site, the practical impossibility of re-establishing it even though all the words and photos are in a document on my computer.

Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,440
Likes: 156
Q
Britbike forum member
Online Happy
Britbike forum member
Q
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,440
Likes: 156
Goat parchment [Linked Image from upload.wikimedia.org] is available for as little as 30 bucks for 8 x10 sheets ,
good for long-term storage of obscure texts
buried in desert caves , so they say , or was that papyrus ?

But to survive a Thermo nuclear attack clay tablets might be more suitable .
Clay tablets are better for shorter stories and shorthand .
It's rumored that Babylon collapsed because all of the scribes had hernias .
Just imagine being a door-to-door encyclopedia salesman in ancient Samaria

1 member likes this: George Kaplan
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 911
Likes: 204
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 911
Likes: 204
You are long inured to the cut and thrust of high academics, but there's always hope for some co-operation from the site owner.
Then you point your ftp client to the folder with those 2000 pics, ask the S/O where they should go and hit go.


1970 T120R - 'Anton'
1970 Commando - 'Bruno'
1967 T120R - 'Caesar'
1968 Lightning - 'Dora'
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Originally Posted by quinten
clay tablets might be more suitable .
Just imagine being a door-to-door encyclopedia salesman in ancient Samaria
There was a lot less knowledge to put in encyclopedias back then, so a couple of clay tablets might have handled everything from ⸅ to ⁁.

1 member likes this: NYBSAGUY
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 911
Likes: 204
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 911
Likes: 204
Looks like most of the BB style forums have Import/Export functions at the admin level.
Don't know what software VOC uses, but unless it's as primitive as it's subject (running on tubed servers?) I'm pretty sure threads can be ported around platform to platform.


1970 T120R - 'Anton'
1970 Commando - 'Bruno'
1967 T120R - 'Caesar'
1968 Lightning - 'Dora'
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 2,668
Likes: 72
Ride safe today!
Offline
Ride safe today!
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 2,668
Likes: 72
Magnetoman, the 5 image per post limit is there for a reason.
Most rules may be subject for exceptions for a good cause.
What I am saying is if someone (like you perhaps) post serious articles and many photos are required
then I can create possibilities to do that but it needs to be discussed in a PM or
within the FAQ forum.
So no need to comment it more within this topic.


Morgan Johansson
BritBike.com.
Support Britbike forum & upgrade your membership
------------------------------
Join our British motorcycle forum on Facebook
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Originally Posted by Morgan aka admin
the 5 image per post limit is there for a reason.
Morgan, thanks very much for your comments. The 5 photos comment I made was only intended to be just one example of a difficulty, for people who might think porting a thread from one place to another would be simple. I can well understand why it's a rule, and it's nice to hear that there might be ways around it, but I don't have anything planned.

Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Although most recently I've been using my 5-gallon buckets of de-greaser and de-ruster solutions on my Vincent, I'll count them as Ariel-related. Because, they are.

As a reminder, the de-greaser I use is Gunk mixed with the specified ratio of diesel rather than kerosene, which seems to be an unobtainable fluid in the desert. However, diesel is the next-door neighbor to kerosene on the petroleum distillation chart and it certainly seems to work great. I don't know how long the mixture takes to work, but I typically hang the parts to be degreased from strings and find they are clean the next day (or two weeks later, if I forget they're there...). And by "de-greased" I include any petroleum-based substance that has solidified years ago. At worst I might have to hit the thickest coatings with a brass brush and soak it another day, but the Gunk/diesel solution has saved me countless hours of manual labor.

The de-ruster started life decades ago as the proprietary Rusteco solution. However, in recent years I've added enough molasses from the feed store that it must be mostly molasses by now. Interestingly, I hadn't de-rusted anything for a while, and when I opened the bucket a month or so ago I found a thin skin had formed on the surface, which is something that hadn't happened before. Perhaps some yeast has gotten into the bucket and is starting to convert the molasses to rum, but I haven't been tempted to taste it. Anyway, like the de-greaser, I don't know how fast it works, but I typically hang parts in it that have "reasonable" amounts of surface rust on them overnight, finding them looking perfect the next day. If something has heavy rust I might leave it for a week, although I don't check in the mean time so the rust may be gone sooner than that.

I had a blasting cabinet in my lab at the university, which was quite handy, but also a bit messy. Because space in my garage is limited I thought I could get away without having a blasting cabinet at home. And I did. Until now. However, paint remover, de-rusting solution, wire wheels, etc. all have their uses, but none of them are a substitute for a blasting cabinet. So, I determined that a cabinet on wheels can fit in the welding corner (which means I won't be able to simultaneously weld and blast), and one is now on order that is supposed to be sturdier than the cabinets sold by Harbor Freight. Also, it's top loading so there's a better chance of it containing loose media when I open it than with the side door of the HF blaster. The cabinet I had in my lab also had a side door, and every time it was opened, media that was trapped in the cracks dropped onto the floor. In addition to rollers, I'll modify the cabinet with additional lights and a better air filtration system.

The cabinet's claimed steady-state air consumption is 9.5 cfm @ 90 psi and I have I have a fairly large compressor (5 h.p./60 gal.) whose specs say it is good for 9 cfm @ 90 psi. Although that's the continuous flow rate measured at the compressor itself, when I had my contractor-friend configure my garage before we moved in I calculated the size of the air line for him to install based on it being large enough to cause little pressure or flow loss at the farthest point is ~45 ft. from the compressor (I don't know how much loss I decided was acceptable but, knowing myself, I'd guess I based my calculation on ~10% maximum).

While the pump itself might "only" be able to supply 9.5 cfm continuously, the 60 gal. tank can supply more than that as long as the lines have a large enough ID to handle more, and until the pressure drops. I have a 20 scfm air flow gauge that I modified to check the flow at the various quick connect fittings (for present purposes there is no difference between scfm and cfm), as shown in the next photograph.

[Linked Image]

Even at the far end of the small diameter (20 ft.?) coiled hose connected to the far end of the air line 45 ft. from the compressor, the air flow pegs this meter at its max. of 20 scfm.

[Linked Image]

On the subject of air, another thing I've avoided doing at my present house is setting up a paint booth. Space limitations are a big part of this, but hating to clean up after painting was an even bigger consideration. But, I'm starting to make plans to do that anyway. Making a long story short, elsewhere Cyborg offered some very helpful advice on setting up a temporary paint booth outside the garage. I have a small spray gun suitable for motorcycle parts that takes 8 cfm, and most guns seem to be in the range 8–10 cfm. In any case, as already written, the cfm rating of my compressor is for continuous use, as might be the case for painting a car, but the stop-and-go painting I do on motorcycle parts, plus the 60 gal. tank, means that even if I wanted to create an even larger mess to clean up by substituting a larger gun, the compressor would be able to handle that without problem (unless I decide to supplement my retirement income by painting trucks). If I decide to use two-pack epoxy paint, I'll have to add air-powered breathing apparatus since I can't hold my breath long enough to paint even a single mudguard stay.

Addendum: I plugged the air flow meter into the farthest point on the line and it took 2 min. 30 sec. for the flow to drop to 15 cfm. The compressor was on at the same time trying to keep up, but it was ~50 ft. away (in a separate small room entered from outside the garage) so I couldn't watch the pressure. Anyway, when blasting I might go for as much as 15 sec. before stopping for another 15 sec. to reposition the part, and the air gun only draws 9 cfm anyway, so basically my compressor should allow me to blast my brains out continuously (i.e. normal stop-and-start) without it ever running out of breath.

Last edited by Magnetoman; 08/13/21 11:37 pm. Reason: Addendum:
Joined: May 2019
Posts: 967
Likes: 357
C
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
C
Joined: May 2019
Posts: 967
Likes: 357
I use a dryer and the instructions say to try and keep it 25’ from the compressor so the heat doesn’t degrade the desiccant. To cool the air and remove as much moisture as possible before it enters the dryer, I made one of these. Valves at the bottom to drain the condensate. Whether or not it’s necessary could be debated, but it can’t hurt. Extending the live of the desiccant might offset the cost of the condenser over a couple of lifetimes and dryer air is a good thing. Built from bits left over from a plumbing reno and mounted on the wall next to the compressor so it’s not robbing me of any usable wall space. Borrowed the idea from a fellow in the UK who does some amazing work on Tritons and MGB’s.


[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]088AF0E8-46F0-48A5-BA76-3EE35BA597EA by First Last, on Flickr

1 member likes this: NYBSAGUY
Joined: May 2019
Posts: 967
Likes: 357
C
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
C
Joined: May 2019
Posts: 967
Likes: 357
BTW 9 CFM @ 90 sounds kind of limp. I’m getting that warm fuzzy smug feeling again. $400 cad used and included air powered jack, 50’ hose reel and dryer. With the money saved, I could splurge for new hatch struts!

[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]D46F4E6D-85A1-4440-967F-B1FA42846BF2 by First Last, on Flickr

Last edited by Cyborg; 08/16/21 10:10 pm.
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,481
Likes: 524
Originally Posted by Cyborg
mounted on the wall next to the compressor so it’s not robbing me of any usable wall space.
Hmm. That's an excellent idea. Even better, my compressor is in its own little room, reducing the risk you're facing of being reported by a neighbor (or by me...) for having a bootleg whiskey still.

Originally Posted by Cyborg
BTW 9 CFM @ 90 sounds kind of limp. I’m getting that warm fuzzy smug feeling again.
Before that smug feeling overtakes you, fella, check the specs on your compressor, because it looks very much like mine. I suspect you'll find it has the same rating (albeit, in devalued Canadian units).

Originally Posted by Cyborg
My apprentice is broadening his horizons
Among the very first words my older granddaughter learned to speak were "oxyacetylene torch." She's now 13 and is constantly doing projects, and when any of them could benefit from help by a power tool, she happily accompanies me to the garage where she has learned to use a drill press, jig saw, band saw, belt sander, etc. etc. The tools in my garage may bypass a generation and go to her.

Page 134 of 139 1 2 132 133 134 135 136 138 139

Link Copied to Clipboard
Job CycleBritish Cycle SupplyMorries PlaceKlempf British PartsPodtronicVintage MagazineBSA Unit SinglesBritBike SponsorBritish Tools & FastenersBritBike SponsorBritBike Sponsor






© 1996-2021 britbike.com
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5