Britbike forum

Classic British SparesKlempf British PartsBaxter CycleBritBike Sponsor SteadfastCyclesThe Bonneville ShopLowbrow CustomsGirling Classic MotorcycleLucas Classic MotorcycleHepolite PistonsIndustrial tec supply Classic Bike Parts Cheshire

Upgrade Your membership! Premium Membership Gold Membership Vendor Membership

New Sponsor post
New FAQ post
Manuals on DVD - Buy 4 for 3
All 4 DVD Manual
Member Spotlight
maylar
maylar
Connecticut
Posts: 303
Joined: July 2003
ShoutChat
Comment Guidelines: Do post respectful and insightful comments. Don't flame, hate, spam.
Top Posters(30 Days)
quinten 68
Top Likes Received (30 Days)
NickL 30
quinten 28
Newest Members
FERRARTIS GROUP LD, Okp, Stevie B, EmmBeeDee, dresda
12,125 Registered Users
Who's Online Now
7 members (konon, Stein Roger, Neil1964, BeezaBryan, Hillbilly bike, Dave Comeau, JDH), 23 guests, and 16 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Statistics
Forums35
Topics76,065
Posts769,652
Members12,125
Most Online151
May 8th, 2022
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 162
Likes: 3
Z
zambu Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Z
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 162
Likes: 3
Hello brit bikers
Preparing for a longer trip (800 miles) with my BSA A10, getting tools and spares ready. Experience from previous trips: Tire puncture, clutch problem, lost bolts, brake cable dammage. But could always do a roadside repair. The white wrapped thing on the left is a new spare tube. Also very helpful is a bunch of friends coming along, although with non british bikes. They also carry their tools, helps to find whats needed most of the times. But its always a compromise between weight and beeing prepared.... Wondering what you other brit bikers carry along!?

The tools / spares:

https://ibb.co/fXtL2xP

A few years ago, clutch repair on the campground:

https://ibb.co/9wsPrjy

Wish you happy driving!

British motorcycles on eBay
Joined: Apr 2011
Posts: 1,191
Likes: 105
Life member
Offline
Life member
Joined: Apr 2011
Posts: 1,191
Likes: 105
I always keep the four smaller Whitworth wrenches, a pair of 7/16, a pair of 1/2 inch wrenches, medium adjustable wrench, pliers, channel locks, Phillips and flat blade screwdrivers, spark plug socket, Allen head wrench for case cover screws, points file, regular size flat file, these all fit in a spot about the size of a quart of oil. A large wrench to fit rear axle nut hides in the saddlebags with a throttle and clutch cable. The little box on top of my gas tank has spare headlight and taillight bulbs, points, condenser, matches, air pressure gauge, electrical tape, a carb jet or two, and a couple razor blades. The opposite saddle bag carries a quart of oil, a small bicycle air pump, tire irons, and a dynamo type flashlight. Somewhere in the bags are a length of electrical wire and fuel line. With all this I can still fit 3x 1 1/2 litre water bottles in each saddle bag.

Edit Also in tank case fuses, those little cable adapters/ends for clutch,brake cables, small pack hand wipes and a rag to keep rattles down. Good idea but not on bike is some antiseptic wash and bandaids/bandage.

Photo below is how I daily ride, tarp for rain cover at work, pack on seat for work gear etc. I like to be ready for a wet day.

[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]

Last edited by Deadstiffcatt; 08/03/21 6:47 pm. Reason: Dazed and confused
Joined: Nov 2020
Posts: 161
Likes: 16
C
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
C
Joined: Nov 2020
Posts: 161
Likes: 16
Triple A or Hagertys.

Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 162
Likes: 3
Z
zambu Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Z
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 162
Likes: 3
Originally Posted by Deadstiffcatt
I always keep the four smaller Whitworth wrenches, a pair of 7/16, a pair of 1/2 inch wrenches, medium adjustable wrench, pliers, channel locks, Phillips and flat blade screwdrivers, spark plug socket, Allen head wrench for case cover screws, points file, regular size flat file, these all fit in a spot about the size of a quart of oil. A large wrench to fit rear axle nut hides in the saddlebags with a throttle and clutch cable. The little box on top of my gas tank has spare headlight and taillight bulbs, points, condenser, matches, air pressure gauge, electrical tape, a carb jet or two, and a couple razor blades. The opposite saddle bag carries a quart of oil, a small bicycle air pump, tire irons, and a dynamo type flashlight. Somewhere in the bags are a length of electrical wire and fuel line. With all this I can still fit 3x 1 1/2 litre water bottles in each saddle bag.

Edit Also in tank case fuses, those little cable adapters/ends for clutch,brake cables, small pack hand wipes and a rag to keep rattles down. Good idea but not on bike is some antiseptic wash and bandaids/bandage.

Photo below is how I daily ride, tarp for rain cover at work, pack on seat for work gear etc. I like to be ready for a wet day.

[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]

You are very well equipped indeed! I need to add the electrical tape. For the rainy days at the camp, I carry also a large tarp to build a "garage".

Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 162
Likes: 3
Z
zambu Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Z
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 162
Likes: 3
Originally Posted by Chip H
Triple A or Hagertys.

Haha yes, for the real bad breakdowns I have that wink But I am not sure if they carry any withworth tools!

1 member likes this: Chip H
Joined: Aug 2015
Posts: 1,881
Likes: 76
A
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
A
Joined: Aug 2015
Posts: 1,881
Likes: 76
I carry my RAC card and mobile phone


BSA B31 500 "Stargazer"
Greeves 200 "Blue Meanie"
Greeves 350
Greeves 360
GM500 sprint bike "Deofol"
Rickman Jawa 500 "Llareggub"
'35 & '36 OK Supreme
Kawasaki ZZR1400 "Kuro No Senshi"
Kawasaki Ninja H2 "Fujin"
1 member likes this: KevRasen
Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,057
Likes: 63
E
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
E
Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,057
Likes: 63
I would add a mini impact driver (for getting outer case screws off), a pair of vise grips, one large and one tiny, a roll of duct tape, and a continuity light.

Ed from NJ

Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 162
Likes: 3
Z
zambu Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Z
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 162
Likes: 3
Originally Posted by edunham
I would add a mini impact driver (for getting outer case screws off), a pair of vise grips, one large and one tiny, a roll of duct tape, and a continuity light.

Ed from NJ

My cases come off quite easily...wonder why wink But yes, the other things are useful.

Joined: Apr 2011
Posts: 1,191
Likes: 105
Life member
Offline
Life member
Joined: Apr 2011
Posts: 1,191
Likes: 105
1: thanks for the reminder- I should have a tube patch kit.
2: double thanks because you made me find a pack of rolling papers, saving me an almost immediate 17 mile trip each way to get some....(yep, right there in the tank case by the matches.....)

A shake up or dynamo flashlight is best, flashlight is no good with dead batteries.
Also slated for my last build: It will be a unit Triumph with a rigid rear end to look like a 1950. I've taken Royal Enfield left and right triangular toolboxes; the left will house my battery and the right box will house the most important of tools......it will be my liquor cabinet to hold a mini bottle of kahlua, a mini vodka, and two glass shot glasses boldly emblazoned with the Union Jack. Style and class reserved for only the finest of emergency moments!

1 member likes this: zambu
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,637
Likes: 154
I
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
I
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,637
Likes: 154
No such thing as "too many tools."
In my years of driving delivery trucks, I always carried a box with a generous supply of tools, along with some spares.

The '70 TR6R I am rebuilding will have the 1966-67 tool tray under the seat, as well as it's stock tool box/side cover on the left side.

Joined: Jun 2017
Posts: 195
Likes: 20
S
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
S
Joined: Jun 2017
Posts: 195
Likes: 20
I recently did 1300 miles in 5 days ( Cross Country Chase) on an A10 with my wife on the back. I ended up adjusting the clutch (pull primary case cover) and fixed a broken top end oil feed pipe which made it necessary to reset the tappets (feeler gauges). I was glad I had a box end wrench to fit the foot peg nut, an assortment of rubber tube in various sizes and some hose clamps. Your tool kit looks comprehensive. If you have a monoblock carb I would consider carrying a pilot jet cover nut and a spare main jet cover nut as I have seen people loose these and then you are stuck. Did anyone mention tie-wire and a sharp knife? I've cut up empty beer cans to make covers, funnels, etc.


Laurence Luce
2 members like this: zambu, Stuart Kirk
Joined: Jun 2017
Posts: 195
Likes: 20
S
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
S
Joined: Jun 2017
Posts: 195
Likes: 20
Another item I had 3 people ask me for on the Chase was a hammer. Some sort of drift is also good to have. Think of how many assemblies are held in place by slotted nuts or threaded covers that require a pin wrench. Bodgery to use a hammer and chisel but it might get you down the road.


Laurence Luce
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 7,709
Likes: 247
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 7,709
Likes: 247
I always carry a fused wire with an alligator clip at each end, a test light, and my Pocket Pro meter in my jacket. Of course, spare fuses.
Spare parts include a 530 master link, and, after my misfortune on TSMR a couple of years ago, a spare rear axle nut.
I suppose that if I were on a long journey I would carry a spare tube, but in the event of a flat I would call the AMA to get hauled somewhere. Not in the mood to do tire surgery on the side of the road.


It's not a bug, it's 'character.'

72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"
92 BMW K100rs "Gustav"
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 3,885
Likes: 46
R
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
R
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 3,885
Likes: 46
I understand your worries but what you need is a comfy motorcycle. If you never changed the throttle wire, well; possibly that would fail so if your bike has good service and you have new electrics; chains etc (if not is crazy to take a long trip anyway) you do not need most of that stuff. Even more if you ride not so fast.
You need the screwdrivers wrenches etc to take off the parts to change the throttle cable and adjust few nuts; bulbs; a puncture spray and not so many more things.

-Few years ago a young British fella with his gal rode from Mexico to here (Uruguay) on a mid 60s BSA; do not know how many km but at least 16000-18000km! They only had a puncture in Bolivia and a problem with the transmission in South Brazil (where they connected to a forum, may be this one, to ask for help on how that thing could be dismantled)

Before this lock of borders here; I did a 1500km trip with one of my bikes (79) and the problem that I had was with the stupid external oil filter (a thing installed by PO) that almost seized the engine; but if was stock, never would happened and I was riding with a new bike besides, so we rode at strong speeds.

1 member likes this: jjdavidson
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 7,709
Likes: 247
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 7,709
Likes: 247
I just put a new clutch cable on the Trident. Now I can carry a spare when I travel.
At least one rider who ended up on the chase truck on TSMR this year did so with a broken clutch cable.


It's not a bug, it's 'character.'

72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"
92 BMW K100rs "Gustav"
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 162
Likes: 3
Z
zambu Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Z
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 162
Likes: 3
Originally Posted by slow learner
Another item I had 3 people ask me for on the Chase was a hammer. Some sort of drift is also good to have. Think of how many assemblies are held in place by slotted nuts or threaded covers that require a pin wrench. Bodgery to use a hammer and chisel but it might get you down the road.

You are right, a hammer can help a lot! Years ago on my friends HD WL 750 the clutch "fell off" the shaft and we found by luck a hammer in a nearby old metal junk container.

Trip is over allready, was good fun, nothing serious to repair. Except the Goldstar BSA which came along, suffered from a rainy night on the campground. He forgot to cover the carburettor, and it was full of water in the morning. Took a while to start... wink


https://ibb.co/RgysjGm

Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 7,709
Likes: 247
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 7,709
Likes: 247
Since the Trident still has the original charging system I also carry a spare rectifier and Zener in my pocket.
I tend to carry one of anything that has ever fallen off in the past. laughing


It's not a bug, it's 'character.'

72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"
92 BMW K100rs "Gustav"
Joined: Feb 2006
Posts: 960
Likes: 5
G
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
G
Joined: Feb 2006
Posts: 960
Likes: 5
I’ve found that if you ride the bike regularly you work out where the potential problems might come from, so the tool kit changes from bike to bike.

A credit card solves most large problems. Or some friends. Everybody is different.

Otherwise needle nose vice grips can be a gear lever, clutch or brake lever, pliers, spanner, clamp.

I also carry cable ties, fuses and twin core wire in case I need a jump start or need to jump someone else.


'51 C11 in a '54 C10L frame. Back on the road...
'70 Triumph Trophy 500. Next on the bench for a refresh!
'72 Triumph Tiger 650. Back on the road...
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 162
Likes: 3
Z
zambu Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Z
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 162
Likes: 3
Originally Posted by DavidP
I always carry a fused wire with an alligator clip at each end, a test light, and my Pocket Pro meter in my jacket. Of course, spare fuses.
Spare parts include a 530 master link, and, after my misfortune on TSMR a couple of years ago, a spare rear axle nut.
I suppose that if I were on a long journey I would carry a spare tube, but in the event of a flat I would call the AMA to get hauled somewhere. Not in the mood to do tire surgery on the side of the road.

They are always things you don't expect, such as the rear axle nut! I never thought about this!

A lost carburettor float bowl / main jet-nut, learned me securing it like this:

https://ibb.co/X7P5cnp

Joined: May 2004
Posts: 5,190
Likes: 178
B
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
B
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 5,190
Likes: 178
Bikes that are properly maintained & regularly ridden do not break down because you find things that require replacement well before they fail.
Having said that, the spare carried depend on the necessity of the bike running for the full time and the space available
I make my own cables so fit free rotating drums to the lever end of my brake & clutch cable thus never had one fail on a ride.
Just in case one did, then a pair each of 4" or 6" long nose & short nose lockjaws, short to hold the outer, & long to hold the broken inner.
Same tools become default gear change if it falls off .
Tubes & tyre irons if it is an interstate / international rally
Plugs, drain bolts , inspection caps & O rings for the above
Globes , fuses , a couple of foot of electrical wire, duct tape Occy straps, a couple of blots that are prone to falling off ( rear stand ) .
A couple of chain links & a short length of chain as I needed to borrow one once .
Then it is a standard tool roll that fits inside a plastic chammois tube
A set of WW open enders, selected WW socket heads , 3/8 socket driver , magneto pinion remover, selected impact driver screwdriver bits & a socket to drive them with , a 6" shifter ( goes in pocket ) carb screw driver ( also goes in pocket ) and greasy hand wipes .

For internationals / interstates, clutch spring tool & hammer


Bike Beesa
Trevor
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 162
Likes: 3
Z
zambu Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Z
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 162
Likes: 3
Trevor, I completely agree, most of us know the weak points of our "ladies" and can check things before they break.

Still, over all the years I had quite some roadside repairs. But with a bunch of friends we always managed to get the bikes running again. And what's better than telling these stories later while having a couple of beers wink

https://ibb.co/cNGVnJc

Joined: Jun 2017
Posts: 195
Likes: 20
S
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
S
Joined: Jun 2017
Posts: 195
Likes: 20
It should be no surprise there is a broad range of expectations and sensibilities represented on this forum. I like to think any bike I own would carry me anywhere I want to go in this world but others will not venture out on a vintage machine any further than they can push back home. To each their own.

As to what to carry along; experience tends to influence choices. I have read accounts of people who rode around the world on vintage bikes ("One Man Caravan" '30s era Douglas for example) and experienced nothing worse than a failed light bulb. That's not my experience. I have a '61 MSS Velocette I have done over 100K miles on and I know and trust it. Still, on a solo trip to Canada from Southern California, in the middle of the desert on a hot day, a recently rebuilt magneto failed. Sure glad I was carrying a spare and was able to install it as the situation was close to dire.

So, make your choices and choose your kit. The bottom line is (to paraphrase Dirty Harry) "Feel lucky Punk?".


Laurence Luce
2 members like this: zambu, Gordon Gray
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,019
Likes: 185
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,019
Likes: 185
Hi All,
While on the 2018 Cannonball where there were extensive and expensive rigs housing all sorts of repair equipment
I was working on Magnetoman's Ariel engine late in the evening, courtesy of Keith Martin, using the onboard mini lathe in their mobile workshop
I needed some emery tape or cloth and a fine file, which none of us had , our other team member did a tour of the car park asking for either item
from other teams to no avail
I do not know how or why I had not packed such basic items? I should have looked at what I have in the tool bag I take with me when I travel and taken note

No one has mentioned packing a small fire extinguisher? these have saved many potential write offs in my experiences !!!

Zambu,
I notice on your A10 that it has a 276 carb with separate float chamber and no air filter or even a gauze
Those carbs can and do easily catch fire if the engine spits back !!! On an A10 it should also have an angled float chamber to compensate for the downdraft mounting
The correct carb for your A10 would be an AMAL Monobloc , which in my experience is a big improvement (plus an air filter)

When I pack for trips on A10 Super Rocket I need to remember a Phillips screw driver bit and a short 17mm spanner for the Mikuni carb in case I need to drain it. I also bring a spare magneto points assembly.
While on Holiday in Switzerland some years ago, on the first fill of petrol one of the taps immediately started to leak badly, so packing a spare tap plunger might also be a good idea

John

Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 7,709
Likes: 247
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 7,709
Likes: 247
Originally Posted by zambu
They are always things you don't expect, such as the rear axle nut! I never thought about this!

A lost carburettor float bowl / main jet-nut, learned me securing it like this:
I never thought about the axle nut either until it happened. It's never happened to me before, or since. Now I check it regularly.
I did have a drain plug escape from the carb once. Lucky the bike didn't catch fire from the petrol on the silencer. At least I was only about 5 miles from home. I now carry a spare plug when I ride the Trident. I guess I should order a spare for the Mk2s on my Bonnie.


It's not a bug, it's 'character.'

72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"
92 BMW K100rs "Gustav"
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 162
Likes: 3
Z
zambu Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Z
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 162
Likes: 3
Originally Posted by chaterlea25
Hi All,
While on the 2018 Cannonball where there were extensive and expensive rigs housing all sorts of repair equipment
I was working on Magnetoman's Ariel engine late in the evening, courtesy of Keith Martin, using the onboard mini lathe in their mobile workshop
I needed some emery tape or cloth and a fine file, which none of us had , our other team member did a tour of the car park asking for either item
from other teams to no avail
I do not know how or why I had not packed such basic items? I should have looked at what I have in the tool bag I take with me when I travel and taken note

No one has mentioned packing a small fire extinguisher? these have saved many potential write offs in my experiences !!!

Zambu,
I notice on your A10 that it has a 276 carb with separate float chamber and no air filter or even a gauze
Those carbs can and do easily catch fire if the engine spits back !!! On an A10 it should also have an angled float chamber to compensate for the downdraft mounting
The correct carb for your A10 would be an AMAL Monobloc , which in my experience is a big improvement (plus an air filter)

When I pack for trips on A10 Super Rocket I need to remember a Phillips screw driver bit and a short 17mm spanner for the Mikuni carb in case I need to drain it. I also bring a spare magneto points assembly.
While on Holiday in Switzerland some years ago, on the first fill of petrol one of the taps immediately started to leak badly, so packing a spare tap plunger might also be a good idea

John

John, thanks for the tip with the carb. I am aware it is not the correct one. It came with the bike when I bought it years ago. It has a gaze / screen on the inlet, maybe you could not see it. It runs quite well, for my understanding. But yes...I might get that correct Monobloc one day....hmm..

On the longer trips I alway carry a small file and some emery cloth, as you saying its needed sometimes.

On one occasion (International BSA Rally in Germany 2011), the newly installed rear brake cable (UK made) lost the pressed- on "end fitting"! I was really surprised! Fortunately a friend carried a little gas torch and some tin, we soldered it and its fine until today.

I carry a fire extinguisher on my old Chevy (used it once!) But never thought loading one onto my bike. A matter of space..?

Page 1 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  Jon W. Whitley 

Link Copied to Clipboard
British Cycle SupplyMorries PlaceKlempf British PartsBSA Unit SinglesPodtronicVintage MagazineBritBike SponsorBritish Tools & FastenersBritBike Sponsor






© 1996-2022 britbike.com
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5