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I don't remember this being an issue in the "old days" and I wish I had known. Had to park the '72 TR6RV for a couple months while my arm healed up and now to idle requires full choke. So I'll remove the carb tomorrow. I just can't remember, and I can't find in "search" the size of the wire or drill bit needed to clear the pilot jet. I'll back-flush the two little holes near the intake mani and do the usual blow-out etc. and it should be good again. The tough part is fitting that rubber connector from the back of the carb to the air box. -BA


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You need a 16 thou or #78 drill epoxied into a wd40 plastic tube, remove the idle mixture jet and clean out the pilot jet by twisting the tube with your fingers as it drills into the jet. Pull out carefully and clean out the crud from the drill flutes and repeat to make sure its done. Then do the other holes using carb cleaner.

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Don't forget the two little holes on either side of the slide at the front of the carb.


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Sea Foam carb cleaner works the best.


Thanks
Al
2016 Tiger 800 XRx
1969 T100R (in Restoration)
1957 T20 (needs restored)
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GREAT. Thanks for the info. I may try this SeaFoam stuff just for kicks. I ordered the drill bit this morning. -Brian


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Hi BA, I’m east of San Francisco, so same fuel. Sitting 2-3 months doesn’t normally cause problems. Charge battery if needed. Good tickle & starts first kick.
Before you pull carb, remove mixture screw. Remove bowl drain.
Take a piece of stranded wire like the sort of wire jaded on the bike. Strip it back a few inches. Fold all but one strand out.
Using flashlight stick the strand into tiny pilot jet hole. Have to aim just right.
Flush with carb cleaner spray.
Compressed air is helpful.

If you have to remove carb, dry it out. Submerge body in white vinegar. Force it into idle fuel passage. The large hole the float bowl passages go to. Flush with hot water.
If you still have plastic float & needle that’s very bad. Probably the real problem. Get Stayup float kit with viton tip aluminum needle.
Don


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Thanks Don, I forgot about the stuff I can do with it on. I just have a feeling that the two tiny holes are clogged and if so it will need to come off. Last time I remember running a length of baling wire through the pilot. I was only interested in seeing if I had a viable project at that point (was the transmission good, Etc.). I get the 0.016" bit Friday so I'll try to wait until then to do anything.Yes, I have the old plastic float and needle. I'm on the verge of ordering a Premier carb but I am cheap to the bone so we'll see. Thanks again, Brian


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Hi BA’

“I have the old plastic float and needle”

In the UK we have only had E5 fuel so far (I believe that will change to E10 quite soon).

It was the attack by E5 on my fibreglass fuel tank that alerted me to possible issues elsewhere.

In my case, the original plastic floats didn’t seem to have suffered at all after ~5 years of E5, but I replaced them with the Stayup floats and alloy needles as a precaution when sorting out the mess.

Quite possibly E10 may be more damaging to original plastic floats (and plastic float needles). Don and others report as much.

If the needle tangs on the float are still springy and in line with the top of the float, then you’re ok for now, at least.
The original plastic needle was always problematic for leaking, hence the almost ubiquitous (for a long time) brass/viton needle, which is best avoided. The alloy/viton needle is the one to use IMHO.

I’ve never had a 16 thou drill, but I have unblocked pilot jets quite a few times using a copper strand from a multistrand cable (most common sizes used on our bikes will be 0.3mm, which is less than 16 thou (~0.4mm).
It can take a bit of pushing and twisting, but once the wire goes through (it must enter the pilot screw orifice to a depth ~three quarters the way through to the other side of the carb, you can easily get a reference for this depth from the underside of a bare carb body), you can then rub the wire back and forth to further abrade deposits from the inside of the jet. The copper wire is unlikely to do significant damage to the brass jet.
I know my method is much more fiddly than just sticking a drill through the jet, but I can’t help thinking that the leading end of the drill runs the risk of abrading some of the brass jet bore.

Of course if the jet is so clogged with hard deposit, then maybe the drill is the only option, but I’ve not found that so far.

Cheers.

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Last edited by desco; 07/20/21 9:24 pm. Reason: addition

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Great info koan58 and desco. Thanks a lot.

This carb never has run correctly since I cleaned it up originally. I was so happy to have a running bike that I was willing to overlook the fact that it only idles with the air screw all the way in. Also, after full warm-up, I need to choke it slightly to get throttle response and full throttle to perform somewhat normally. Both indicate a lean condition which could be that the original slide needs replacing and other areas need to be investigated. The carb kit I did order came with a puny little o-ring to seal carb to manifold so I used the gasket. I probably need the correct o-ring. Also I did order a slide but it would not fit into the bore and i had to return it. Seriously thinking "Premier" before I spend too much more on this one. A Premier costs nearly what I paid for this bike, so it is a difficult decision -Brian

Last edited by BAinLA; 07/20/21 10:31 pm.

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“A Premier costs nearly what I paid for this bike”

You’ve obviously got an amazing bargain! Don’t let that colour your expenditure on important items to get the bike running well.

Don’t skimp on the carb, it is crucial for good running.

Try to sort the existing one, only if it is beyond redemption then replace it.

Only if the bore is worn out does it need replacing. If it worked well previously, you may be wasting money.

I’d suggest closer examination.

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+1 with Kommando.
Don't use wire to clean the pilot jet.
Use a #78 drill bit.
You are trying to resize the jet back to its original size by removing the crud.
Using electrical wire or a guitar string sounds good but you wont necessarily clear the jet around all of its circumference and you will probably scratch the jet bore and make it out of size.
#78 drill bits cost virtually nothing so IMHO there is no excuse for not doing the job properly.
IMHO wire in a jet is a bodge.

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Well TM I have done the job many times using a copper strand.

Copper is softer than the brass of the jet. Read my description, I find it works just fine, over the last 45 years.

I don’t mind if you don’t subscribe to my experience, it was only my pennyworth.

Why do you think the copper strand will scratch the brass bush, and the steel drill will not?

As I tried to describe, my method takes much longer than simply sticking the drill through, you takes yer time and makes yer choice, I know what I prefer, and it leaves the pilot jet original (not slightly reamed out by the drill).

I’m waiting for the orthodox responses.

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A sharp edged piece of wire will scratch the bore of the jet.
The concept of the drill bit is not to machine the jet bore but to drill out the crud--leaving the jet in its original state.
However as you say-- we live in a free democratic society so it is up to each of us to weigh up the facts and fallacies of the situation and make up our own minds.
It must be obvious what I will be using in the future---the same as i have for the past 60 years.

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I've done it both ways. Doesn't seem to matter. Most times just blowing some aerosol canned carb cleaner from two directions followed by a clean out with 60 pounds of air does the trick. What I have learned, in almost 50 years of Triumphs, is that every time I try to go on the cheap, it costs me twice as much.
Do it right the first time.

If you don't have the money to do it right the first time, you will always find the money to do it over.


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"A sharp edged piece of wire will scratch the bore of the jet."

How does that fit with Moh's scale of hardness?

So would a sharp edge of lead scratch a surface of steel? Just to exemplify the point regarding materials of different hardness

I don't blame folk for using drill bits, especially in industry, cos its quick and efficient, but in irreplaceable situations like old Concentrics I would be more cautious (unless you wish to promote the sale of new Premiers).

A little piece of wire does it, given enough patience, preserving the pilot jet. If you don't have the patience, stick a 16 thou drill through it.

The choice is yours.

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Having looked at the thread again, it's hardly likely to be an ancient hardened plug, a little poke should do it, no need to drill IMHO.

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Thanks again.

Koan58, I looked at your last post and agreed with your assessment and went out and blasted away with carb cleaner (air screw and bowl drain removed). I followed this with multiple shots of compressed air. Started it up and now it runs better than ever. Idle mixture is now adjustable and is smoother as a result of a quick tune. I ran it up to 6500 RPM on the road and it seems perfect all the way, no choke necessary it seems on first run. I may have over-reacted. It's a learning (or re-learning) experience. Dark out now and I'm running with a Lucas candle for a "headlight" so I'll put it through it's paces tomorrow. Thanks again to all. -Brian


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Hi Brian, New Premier carbs are excellent & really do last very long time. Amazingly long. The body & anodized slide just don't seem to wear. I'm overhauling my '73 Tiger. I got new Premier a few years ago. Super trouble free & I'm just shocked at the low wear.

The needle & needle jet does wear as before. But still seems good enough for 12k miles. It comes with stay up float & viton tipped needle. Those hold their adjustment very well for many years & don't leak fuel by needle at all unless rust or dirt from gas tank gets into carb.

Seriously, I haven't touched the mixture or idle speed screws in over 2 years. They just work that good.

Pilot jet is removable. So you can easily blow out idle fuel passages. The floor holes are larger so less tendency to clog. Many little differences in the carb you notice upon close examination. One oddity is I'm finding the bike tends to work better with .019 pilot jet in Premiers on California fuel. Generally will put mixture screw very close to 1.5 turns. Another oddity & this is very important to know. The float level is very different. It's just above & level with bowl gasket surface holding bowl upside down letting float hang while holding fulcrum pin with finger. Being careful to not interfere with float drop.

Also "generic" Premier comes ready to tune, even though many parts sellers offer it under the correct part #, like it's specific for your bike. Don't fall for that. Verify it has correct, top. slide cutaway, main jet, pilot jet, banjo fittings you want/need. I ended up ordering direct from AMAL & they made it to my specs & even stamped the correct # on side of carb. Still a few dollars less than any USA sellers. Way less than a "correct" Tiger carb. Some sellers are now willing to put correct parts on the carb for free or reasonable price. Nothing for AMAL carb is cheap as well know.

I'm as cheap as you!! New carb was just under $200. No way would I buy a new carb unless I knew I really needed it. I'd already got stay up float after carb flooded & I got air box fire starting bike. Only God put it out. I'd just had bike back on road a few months after 34 years of storage. So the plastic float is nothing to play with.

I've diagnosed a few worn carbs now. So far has 100% accuracy rate. This was told to me by Britbike member 4 years ago. The only really costly part on old carb that really wears is body bore & slide.

The first step is a perfect tune up, valve adjustment, point gap (if used), timing, new plugs. Fresh fuel. Compression test just to be sure it's good. Good battery, good charging system, clean good fuse. All electrics are good to ignition system, including ignition switch & kill switch. Good grounds everywhere including motor & the ground at front battery tray mount. If you have tuning or electrical problems at all, you'll chase your tail diagnosing carb wear or any carb problem.

So all the above has tested good. Road test bike at least 30 or more miles so motor is really heat soaked. Adjust idle rpm & mixture. Ride so more & verify the carb adjustments seem good. Mixture screw should be 1.5 turns, +- a 1/4 turn or so. If much farther off you have other problems with idle circuit.

Now, pull over, put in neutral & let bike idle for about 15-20 seconds. Now turn throttle slow as possible. I mean slowly. Keep turning slowly. If carb is good, no matter how slow you turn throttle the motor will not falter or want to die. The rpm will just slowly increase no matter how slow you turn throttle. No excess wear in slide/bore. New carb probably not needed. Go ahead & get stay up float, needle, needle jet, slide if you want.

If carb is worn the rpm will not rise smoothly. It will falter. Depending on wear in bore/slide it will die. Restart bike, ride a block or so & do test again. This time turn throttle medium quickly, not fast as you can. Does the motor pick up as expected. Don't jump to conclusions! Do this test many times. Do it over a few days. $200 savings is worth the time. So repeatedly dies or wants to die turning slowly, turning quicker no dies. You'll soon get the feel for this & can get it to die or nearly die at will. You'll get the feel for faster throttle will pass the dying zone. On very worn carb ( like mine was) once you get the feel for this you can feel motor falter/die at lower speeds while riding, but momentum of bike keeps motor spinning. It might occasionally die though like in stop/go traffic.

Now turn mixture screw out 1/4 turn ish from ideal.(leaner). Does this seem to help a little? It usually does. Why would lean help, makes no sense, but I've observed this 100% on the bad worn carbs.

Replacing slide with new or good used may or may not give temporary improvement depending on carb wear. Might get you a few thousand more miles, but don't expect much.

If you do this "wear test" carefully it will let you know if you need new carb or not. It really will.

On the other hand, you can learn to drive around the dying zone until carb is horribly worn. At a point it becomes dangerous to ride in city as it is so prone to dying at the worst times. I put several thousand more miles on carb once I diagnosed it. (remember I had stay up float installed long ago). New premier was on back order for months & months. When I finally got it was like a miracle!

AMAL is a little weak on quality control sometimes. The carb may have metal flash or metal chips in bowl and/or passages. Casting flash in bottom area of bowl around idle fuel passages can be problematic. Any loose or thin flash break off & dress area with file or the like if/as needed. Carb body is usually ok, but bowl flash may be in idle passage already. Float level must be verified. The liquid level is unchanged, but as I stated the float level position is very different. If you lower it to .070-.080" below bowl gasket surface, it will be be way too lean. Don't do that. The o-rings on mixture, idle screw, pilot jet fit very tight in body & the bore edge can be very sharp & tend to cut ring putting in screw. Smooth edge of bore if/as needed. Put a dab or grease or even oil on oring to help reduce friction & ease of entering bore. It won't make screw back out or anything. Just allows for smooth adjustments.

'72 TR6RV is a great bike! Well worth fully sorting & spending some $$ on.
Don

Last edited by TR7RVMan; 07/21/21 5:33 am. Reason: changed sentence

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Thanks Don! Excellent write-up. I read it twice (so far) and will be doing the test as described later when all my neighbors are awake. I can tell that it is worn already using your metrics in that If the choke is 100% open with the engine hot, it will stall with medium throttle increase such as when sudden acceleration is needed or wanted. To get around this I just leave the choke closed about 5% or so and it performs perfectly although I am sure I am leaving some HP on the table. The other trouble with this is that if it is choked too much I would assume that carbon buildup would accrue and this does seem to be occurring. Will decide today on the Premier. My favorite supplier, Vintage Triumph Supply apparently has raised his price and is also out of stock so I'll be checking around for the absolute lowest price. Thanks again, Brian

Edit: On the AMAL site it shows all Premiers "out of stock". Hmmm. http://amalcarb.co.uk/mk-i-Concentric-series/900-series/base-line-specifications/30mm-bore.html

Last edited by BAinLA; 07/21/21 3:12 pm.

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Hi Brian, Looking like carb body castings are back ordered at AMAL. Have been for some months already. Took me about a year to get one. The way I understand it, AMAL had foundry that does casting. Covid spare time has gotten project bikes out of storage & parts suppliers are selling out of all sorts of things. Seems like it’s starting to catch up a bit.

Back to your carb I’m not so sure your current problem is related to wear in body/slide. Once slide is off idle .015-.030”, the wear doesn’t seem to show up much. Of course you may have wear + other problems.

If carb can’t be found probably worth buying stayup float kit for the mean time. It will at least allow accurate diagnosis.

The choke has pretty much minimal if any effect until slide uncovers choke. So indeed you have other issues.

It all starts with correct liquid level in bowl. Best measured with manometer tube. 1/4” clear tube (no skinnier) from drain plug zip tied to side of bowl. Bike level turn on gas & watch bowl fill. When filling stops that’s fuel level.

You have a lot going on. When I get to PC later I’ll post the real John Healy tuning guide. Print & take on road tests. Takes some practice. But you’ll soon get feel for it.

Overall I find bikes work better with about 5% richer over with our fuel. E10 91 octane. Don’t even think about using 89 or 87.

Also what are you using for ignition, mufflers, air filters. All this matters.

PM me your email if you want. I have pictures of all this, & the genuine AMAL float level spec sheet.

Of course most these old bikes carb is very worn. By 15k miles we’re long on the tooth, by 20k usually totally worn out.

Needle wear is big deal as is needle jet wear. .0005” wear is plainly felt in running of motor.

Most riding is 1/16-1/8 throttle. Crazy but true. Needle wears at this point. Now too rich here, & just off idle. With our fuel, too lean at unworn part of needle.
Needle jet wears also. Adds to too rich low opening, but helps on unworn part of needle.

A new new needle in worn jet?? Yes than can be better better running sometimes.

Since choke seems to help I’d make sure needle clip is on bottom groove. Full throttle at 65 mph is main jet test. Don’t be surprised if 1 size larger main jet is better. I start with main jet too big & 8 stroking. A decided misfire that sounds like ah ah ah ah, backing off throttle goes away. Full throttle comes right back. I go 1 main jet smaller at a time until 8 stroking goes away.

Trust me, if you’re lean at 1/2 to full throttle you will hole a piston in summer heat once you get into hills east of you.

I’ve had a lot of problems with Emgo paper air filter elements. They modify mixture at different air flows & elevations. I chased my tail for 2 months. Wire gauze like Original is all I’ll use now.
Don


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Hi Don. I'm running 100% stock, just the way it was from the factory and the original owner who took meticulous care of it. Stock (brand new old stock) air filters were in their 1985 wrapping before I installed them (they set the guy back $20 for the two filters). I did buy a new needle jet. The slide has almost 22K miles on it and is worn. There is major gap between body and slide. I grew up wrenching these old beasts and I already know that the slide needs replacing however a new one would not fit. I assume that the carb mounting nuts have been over-torqued.
With the choke slightly closed, this carb performs flawlessly under all conditions and phases. I'm sure that power is down at FT though as a result. The dead spot (with choke open) is when you try to roll on the power too fast. Perhaps I need to raise the needle a notch. If memory serves, I believe FT is a bit shaky too with choke open. It's running a .230. Hard to imagine that it needs bigger than that and I'm pretty sure I cleaned it up very thoroughly.
I drove it all late summer and fall last year in the 100°+ weather up Angels Crest twice and all over creation with no problem but I am concerned about lean running.
The float level was way off when I first went through it and I was successful heating the plastic tangs, adjusting them and quenching. Got the float level perfectly set that way but maybe the tangs have crept back to the old position over time and heat cycles. Thanks Don. -Brian


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Hi Brian, Ok, Good, you are experienced & understand what's going on.

At 22k I'm sure carb is worn out. My experience is the plastic float tangs will not hold position with our E10 fuel. The float itself will get spongy. However, taking float out & letting it dry a week or so it gets hard again. Oddly our fuel doesn't effect the banjo strainer at all.

I had rust in my tank. I put paper inline fuel filters from Car Quest & then Orielly's in my feed lines. Fuel dissolved the epoxy where paper was glued to end bell. I was getting gooy balls of something sticky that could pass through banjo strainer, yet stick the float needle open. Fuel would pour out of tickler. I'd tickle it pump tickler plunger & it would clear up. Removing drain plug the balls of goo would fall out. I was running clear fuel hose at the time. Took a while to figure out it was filter epoxy. I thought is was from walls of clear fuel hose. I noticed the paper loose one day as filters were clear. Handy to see when rust clogged. I Cut filter open & was obvious. I then got different brand filter that's crimped, not glued from Orielly's. I'd have to check the package for #.
I now only use Gates carb/evap black fuel hose. It lasts good much more fire resistant, but doesn't look so original. I cleaned & lined tank with caswell. No more rust but still use filters so I can see the fuel flowing though. No real need to see fuel, but it makes me feel better.

Back to carb as you know the needle is straight, then tapered. When on straight part is in jet clip groove makes no difference.

Marking the grip accurately when tuning carb is very important. Turn grip to lightly to take up cable slack. Mark that zero. Full throttle is full mark. Visually divide that in half make mark. Divide in half again until you get 1/8s.

Main jet is factory spec 230 like you have. May want to try one size larger?? For certain I'd put clip on bottom groove of needle. I indeed know how you have to remove carb & deal with the boot to remove carb top... I hate that!

Check the liquid float level again to be sure it hasn't changed. If it's changed I'd get stay up float kit until new carb comes available

A right Bonnie carb if they swap slide you could use. The old top & banjo will swap over, Main jet will swap over. They may all be sold out. I haven't shopped for carbs in a while.

Here's the tuning guide. Print the road test pages. The float level is for older carbs, not premier. If using stayup in old carb use old carb float level measurement. Again liquid level test is the only real way to know liquid level. Float level measurement/adjust is just a get it close method.


https://static1.squarespace.com/sta...2/1481956877861/Amal+MK2+Carb+Manual.pdf


Marking grip I put masking tape on the chrome throttle housing. Tape on the flange of grip. I have stock turismo grips with the large flange. I mark the the housing with the 1/8s & put line on the grip. No matter so long as you can see it easily when riding. I left it marked for over 1000 miles. Learned a lot!

The roll off test for lean is kind of nebulous sometimes. Takes some practice. Play around with it & see if you can feel it. Problem is, if not lean enough I really can't feel it. I'll often go richer to see if it's better, then leaner to see if it's worse. Going lean is risky of course. Go easy on that. I have a carb road test route. A short route 10 miles & long route 60 miles. A main jet test hill which is west bound to Caldecott tunnel. Hwy 24. It's freeway. I have to plan for traffic.

Snap throttle is interesting. Once you gain experience you can hear 8 stroking on snap throttle if cutaway is too small. I ended up getting a bunch of new main jets for testing & some really good used slides. Same with slides as jets. I'll evaluate snap throttle. Then decide which slide. Too rich will die somewhat like too lean, but rich I can hear the 8 stroke before it falters too bad. I'll trial fit slides & fit what runs best overall. Seems 90% one is a tad rich, the next size is tad lean. I then tend to default to tad rich.

Throwing in monkey wrench.... AMAL now sells a .1065 needle jet. For when you need a tad richer, but .107 is too rich. One step on needle jet like 106 to 107 is quite a bit of fuel. So the .1065 can work pretty well. Like I said earlier a worn 106 can give similar results as .1065.

I run points. I tend to run timing a bit retarded. The line on rotor 3/64" towards front wheel compared to pointer. I also shortened both advance springs 1/2 the loop (hook) on one end. Doesn't really to too much but pulls back to 14b more reliably at idle & calms advance just above idle.

These bikes simply was not designed to use 91 octane E10 fuel. I used to run 110 leaded race gas. Ran like 1973 Chevron Custom Supreme 100 octane. I got tired of the 100 mile leash, not to mention $12 gallon. Torco fuel accelerator works great. Need to use full strength for 100 octane. Very costly. The only additive that actually works.

This stuff is not simple. It's a process. Trust me, once you get premier installed. Do the hard work of evaluating & tuning as needed, the bike will start & run so good you'll not believe it.

Do you have a friend you could borrow stayup float from until new carb arrives? Lots of us put in stayup some years ago, then got new carb that came with one. Stayup you just bent tin tabs at float side of pivot to set float level. Counter hold tab, so use 2 needle nose pliers when bending. Otherwise pivot tabs will open. If they open bend them back & try again.
Don


1973 Tiger 750
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'Morning Don. Thanks for the detailed info! I will print up all of your posts as well as the linked data.

Right now it runs like a charm as long as I choke it down a touch. For now I may leave it this way until the Premiums become available as I sort out other concerns with the bike. I've got oil leaking onto the left header, possibly from the o-ring on the push-rod tube (I've forgotten the configuration up there after all these years). If I'm lucky, it will be a rocker cover gasket. Also the left header is loose in the head and is hogging out the metal there with the vibration. There is a small stream of oil going though the ignition points chamber. Little things like that need attention before I can truly consider this bike roadworthy. For now though, engine never misses a beat and seems strong enough for spirited riding and freeways , although I avoid them like the Virus until I fully sort this machine. Would be nice to have some sort of wind screen and a decent helmet that doesn't act as a drag-chute on my head-and the noise is enough to damage ears for sure. We were talking about carbs, sorry. I am thinking PREMIER. I'm also thinking about selling this bike and buying a new one or probably just keep the memories of the old Triumph I bought and fixed up. Thanks again, Brian


1972 TR6RV
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Hi Brian, Wet with water points won’t run. Oily points will, but not really properly & the oil vapor in case tends to burn contact faces. That seal can be hard to change in place. Without damage anyway, cover in place. I remove timing cover & change
both seals.

Push in exhaust was a BSA induced disaster!! I hate it!!! However if you have it as we do you have to deal with it.

Real cure is install threaded stubs & replace with the special built front pipes with crossover or not your choice. My left pipe became loose & wore head. I got tail pipe expander & enlarged pipe to fit. I soon found expander ovalized pipe. Since port wears oval I used this to my advantage. Marking pipe, expander & head I clocked expander as needed to match pipe to head until snug sliding fit. Used Permatex ultra copper silicone sealant as a back up. Worked well over 20k miles so far.

You’ve got a lot going on. I have $4500 in my motor overhaul so far. Not done yet. Crank not balance yet. $900 for bore, black Diamond valves & guides. That’s the only sublet work. Needed high gear, lay shaft, MS 4th. Every bearing will be new. Right crank bearing pitted bad. All parts top drawer.

By time you have the bike fully sorted you’ll spend a lot of $$. These bikes are money pits.

We ride often & far. About 5k miles a year average. The short coffee run is 60 miles for me. 300 mile day is no big deal. Sounds like you’ll ride far also. So reliability is important.

I have a few riding friends with modern Bonnie’s fuel injected. Very reliable, durable & trouble free. We’ll swap bikes occasionally on rides. We’re that good of friends.

All these guys have or had vintage Triumphs also. To a man the feeling is modern Bonnie lacks soul compared to vintage. But at a point you just want to ride & not deal with old bike. I get that 100%. Nothing wrong with that. If you have space keep old bike also.

If you are ready to let the ‘72 go sell as is. Cut your losses. If you add cost of reconditioning + current selling price you’ve paid for a 6-8 year modern Bonnie low miles & perfect condition. Resale price of modern Bonnie is very low. Or it pays half to 2/3 cost of new depending on version you choose.

Have you ridden modern Bonnie? Go to dealer & road test. Then you’ll know. They run & ride really well. Just like you’d hoped they would. 70-75 on freeway is just effortless. Cornering, braking is good. Have real headlight!

The vintage bike is raw motorcycling. You feel everything. Kind of fatiguing really, no mistaking it’s a real motorcycle.
Don


1973 Tiger 750
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