Britbike forum

Classic British SparesKlempf British PartsBaxter CycleBritBike Sponsor SteadfastCyclesSRM EngineeringLucas Classic MotorcycleIndustrial tec supplyHepolite PistonsThe Bonneville Shop

Upgrade your membership to: Premium Membership | Gold Membership | Life Membership | Vendor Membership | Site Sponsor Membership
Member Spotlight
Kenny
Kenny
Oklahoma
Posts: 33
Joined: July 2003
ShoutChat
Comment Guidelines: Do post respectful and insightful comments. Don't flame, hate, spam.
Search eBay for motorcycle parts in following countries
Australia, Canada, France, Holland, Italy, United Kingdom, USA
Top Posters(30 Days)
Allan G 67
quinten 62
DavidP 55
Top Likes Received (30 Days)
Cyborg 24
Allan G 18
Newest Members
neilhart, Dguzzi, Peter McCarthy, Seb Clare, Trevi
11,779 Registered Users
Who's Online Now
7 members (Brian Brown, linker48x, Mike W., BeezaBryan, Magnetoman, raf940, KevRasen), 41 guests, and 90 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 21 of 21 1 2 19 20 21
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
Originally Posted by Cyborg
Thought maybe my reference to your regularity and contemporaneous note taking might be a bridge too far.
As far as notebooks and note taking are concerned, physicists are shameless. There's no piece of data too insignificant to record.

Originally Posted by Cyborg
I’d give some thought to building in a roller starter. Not sure that makes sense if one is still able to kick over a Gold Star long enough for it to start.... or drag the portable starter off the trailer.
As you probably remember, one of the two reasons I installed a large battery box for the DocZ's battery instead of using a tiny one for the electric brakes was so I could haul along the DocZ (the other reason was to power the trailer's LED ceiling lights). That does mean having to drag the DocZ off the trailer, but I suspect that, at best, there only will be a short window in time when I'm too feeble to move the DocZ, but still strong enough to offload a bike from the trailer and ride it.

I have visions of your trailer having a starter built into the floor, and you then launching yourself, Evel Knevel-like, out the back door.

[Linked Image]

Support Your #1 BritBike Forum!

Check out British motorcycles for sale: British Motorcycles on e-Bay UK, British motorcycles on e-Bay North America
Joined: May 2019
Posts: 921
Likes: 341
C
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
C
Joined: May 2019
Posts: 921
Likes: 341
Well it certainly wouldn’t go like that. For starters, I wouldn’t likely be on a Sportster, and as much as I’m in favour of gay pride... unlikely to be dressed that way. Knevel could pull it off, but me not so much. As for attire... had a few free lunches offered to me by folk who assumed I’m homeless.
I think I’d be inclined to start the bike in the opposite direction as well. Have it tethered down, start it and then back off the trailer. Bike would likely be loaded front first any? Just guessing because I’ve never used a roller starter. I just now managed to kick the Triumph into life and take it up and down the street a few times. Almost made it halfway down the street before someone backed out in front of me... so situation normal there. Front brake it totally useless and the rear is only slightly better, so back into the shop.

Last edited by Cyborg; 04/02/21 10:15 pm.
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,842
Likes: 140
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,842
Likes: 140
I have my Doc Z set up with it's own dolly that also carries the battery. Doc Z's dolly setup was like $400 more!


GrandPaul (does not use emoticons)
Author of the book "Old Bikes"
Too many bikes to list, mostly Triumph & Norton, a BSA, & some Japanese
"The Iron in your blood should be Vintage"
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
Originally Posted by Cyborg
I think I’d be inclined to start the bike in the opposite direction as well. Have it tethered down, start it and then back off the trailer.
Based on your premise of looming decrepitude, I think your idea is a, um, non-starter. You'd have to cut a hole in the trailer to mount most of the starter mechanism below it, significantly reducing ground clearance. My DocZ is ~5" high and most of that would have to be below floor level. And that's assuming nothing structural was under the floor where the starter needed to be.

Leaving clearance aside, I wouldn't trust a decrepit old man to be able to pull the wheels of a bike over the protruding rollers of the starter without stumbling, while simultaneously blipping the throttle to keep it from stalling, and easing it down the ramp.

Originally Posted by GrandPaul
I have my Doc Z set up with it's own dolly that also carries the battery.
+1. If someone can ease a 400 lb. bike down a ramp, they can ease a much lighter DocZ on a dolly down a ramp. In my case the battery is mounted on the front of the trailer so the weight is quite a bit less than yours.

Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,842
Likes: 140
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,842
Likes: 140
I have spray-painted in large red letters over the ramp door openings of my trailers "WATCH YOUR HEAD".

I could just see a whiz-bang (literally) launch out of the back of a trailer where that reminder was neglected.

Every time someone is helping me load or unload, I mention it as we approach the ramp "watch your head"; about 1 in 4 or 5 times, I quickly get the "whump" / "ouch!" It's just a thing...

Last edited by GrandPaul; 04/03/21 1:50 pm.

GrandPaul (does not use emoticons)
Author of the book "Old Bikes"
Too many bikes to list, mostly Triumph & Norton, a BSA, & some Japanese
"The Iron in your blood should be Vintage"
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
Today provided a worst-case test of how well the insulation in the trailer works. We're in the middle of a streak of setting temperature records and, as the first photograph shows, at 1:30 pm it was 108.1 ℉ in the shade (the high for the day was still a few hours away).

[Linked Image]

Unlike our remote home thermometer, the trailer wasn't in the shade. As the next photograph shows, the outside surfaces of its roof and the two walls that were in direct sunlight were at 175–183 ℉ (the two walls that were in the shadow cast by the trailer were at 135–140 ℉).

[Linked Image]

Given the above, plus the IR entering through the windows, it shouldn't be surprising that the inside of a car parked in direct sunlight today would be at least 190 ℉ (which is why every year a least a few kids die when their parents leave them in the car "for just a few minutes").

As can be seen, at the same time the inside the trailer it was just 111.1 ℉ (ignore the clock, which I haven't bothered setting, it was within a few minutes of the first two photographs).

[Linked Image]

Temperatures of 100+ ℉ aren't fit for man nor beast, so I don't plan to be working on motorcycles under those conditions, but what this shows is when outside temperatures are in a reasonable range, the inside temperature will be as well, even though the outside walls will be considerably hotter than the outside ambient temperature.

Update: Three and a quarter hours of baking later, during which the temperature in the shade had risen by two degrees and fallen back to 108.0 ℉, the temperature in the trailer had gone up by four degrees, to 115.2 ℉.

[Linked Image]

The insulation performed admirably on this record-breaking day.

Last edited by Magnetoman; 06/17/21 12:05 am. Reason: Update:
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,842
Likes: 140
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,842
Likes: 140
100 inside is NO FUN (no need to ask how I've known this ALL MY LIFE)...


GrandPaul (does not use emoticons)
Author of the book "Old Bikes"
Too many bikes to list, mostly Triumph & Norton, a BSA, & some Japanese
"The Iron in your blood should be Vintage"
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
Originally Posted by GrandPaul
100 inside is NO FUN
Yeah, I wasn't proposing to work in the trailer, or anywhere else, at such temperatures. Just walking through the 110 ℉ to get to the air conditioned garage the past few days has been enough to suck most of the energy from me. Consider the values in my last post as the results of a stress-test of the insulation that determined it will work quite well at more humane temperatures, low as well as high.

Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,205
Likes: 121
Q
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Q
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,205
Likes: 121
for about 4 grand you could outfit the trailer roof
with solar panels ( with an air gap between the panels and trailer roof ) ... trailer in now in the shade .
and put some panels on the side that hinge out to make an awning when parked ... more shade

the panels coud operate a 10,000 BTU direct DC ( no inverter ) AC unit
That would drop the temperature about 20 degrees .

To recoup some of the exorbitant price , the panels could be plugged
into some of the home loads when parked .

Last edited by quinten; 06/18/21 5:18 am.
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
Originally Posted by quinten
the panels coud operate a 10,000 BTU direct DC ( no inverter ) AC unit
For about four months, desert dwelling motorcyclists experience the opposite of wind chill. When the air temperature rises above the skin temperature the faster you ride the hotter it becomes. Unlike wind chill where it's possible, at least in principle, to have riding clothes that keep you comfortable, there's nothing to be done about 95+ ℉. Basically, this means air conditioning wouldn't be especially useful since the trailer is for hauling bikes to the cool mountains where it's actually possible to ride without dehydration and heat stroke this time of year. Ideally the bikes won't break but, if they do, it won't be anywhere close to 110 ℉ inside the trailer when working on them.

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 5,797
Likes: 159
G
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
G
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 5,797
Likes: 159
If you are trailering to the mountains you can use gravity to start your bike , no fancy rollers needed. I experienced extreme heat in Spain on my bike, that was very weird getting hotter on a bike as you ride it, being Scottish I nearly feinted from dehydration before I realised I needed to top up on fluids as much as the bike did.. It was nt 100 plus , I would just melt in that heat. its lovely here in Argyll the moment, the air is balmy and scented with Hawthorn and Azaleas, no air con needed.. hard to bear MM i feel slightly sorry for you..


71 Devimead, John Hill, John Holmes A65 750
56 Norbsa 68 Longstroke A65
Cagiva Raptor 650
MZ TS 250
The poster formerly known as Pod
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
Originally Posted by gavin eisler
was very weird getting hotter on a bike as you ride it,
New arrivals to the desert have to be told to drink lots of water even though they never feel any sweat, because it evaporates the moment it makes its way to the surface of the skin. Once you're sweating as fast as your body is able to, that's the limit of evaporative cooling. Because of the low humidity, when you get out of the pool on a 110 ℉ day you feel chilly until the water evaporates, but on a motorcycle the crossover point where the evaporation of your sweat no longer does you any good is in the mid-90s. From there on, every additional mph or ℉ just makes you that much hotter.
Originally Posted by gavin eisler
i feel slightly sorry for you..
In the midst of this heatwave covering nearly half the country, even the mountains at 9,000 ft. are in the mid-90s. I feel really sorry for me...

Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,813
Likes: 188
S
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
S
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,813
Likes: 188
Originally Posted by gavin eisler
It was nt 100 plus , I would just melt in that heat. its lovely here in Argyll the moment, the air is balmy and scented with Hawthorn and Azaleas, no air con needed...
It's what the body acclimatises to. It's almost midwinter day here, and our maximum temperature probably won't be far short of yours (currently 15 degrees C, with a forecast maximum of 17)

When I was a young bloke working on the family's farm in NW NSW, Magnetoman's 110+ degrees F would have been reason to work in the shed in the shade. It would knock the stuffing out of me now, because we moved to a locations with a somewhat smaller temperature range..

Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
Originally Posted by Shane in Oz
110+ degrees F would have been reason to work in the shed in the shade.
It's not a round number in ℃, but yesterday set an all-time record here as the sixth day in a row above 110 ℉ (43 ℃), with several of those days at 45 ℃ (113 ℉). All the mad dogs are in hiding, and the Englishmen (and Australians) in the hospital with heat stroke.



If the weather prediction is accurate, two more days will be added to the record before the temperature plummets to a high of only 106 ℉ (45 ℃) on Monday.

Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,813
Likes: 188
S
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
S
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,813
Likes: 188
Originally Posted by Magnetoman
It's not a round number in ℃, but yesterday set an all-time record here as the sixth day in a row above 110 ℉ (43 ℃), with several of those days at 45 ℃ (113 ℉). All the mad dogs are in hiding, and the Englishmen (and Australians) in the hospital with heat stroke.

There's a reason that even the swaggies pull up in the shade.




"Camp" is a rather overloaded term, but one of the Australian meanings is to stay put for a while, not necessarily overnight.

Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 862
Likes: 183
Member
Online Content
Member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 862
Likes: 183
There once was a man from Australia
Who painted his arse like a dahlia
The color was fine
Likewise the design
But oh, the aroma was a failure


1970 T120R - 'Anton'
1970 Commando - 'Bruno'
1967 T120R - 'Caesar'
1968 Lightning - 'Dora'
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,813
Likes: 188
S
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
S
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,813
Likes: 188
Nice limerick, but the last line doesn't scan properly. "But the aroma was quite a failure" might work better. even though it still has a syllable too many.

1 member likes this: NYBSAGUY
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 862
Likes: 183
Member
Online Content
Member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 862
Likes: 183
I concur.
If I remember correctly, the version from Breaker Morant, where I first heard it went:
But the aroma, uhh, that was a failure.


1970 T120R - 'Anton'
1970 Commando - 'Bruno'
1967 T120R - 'Caesar'
1968 Lightning - 'Dora'
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,813
Likes: 188
S
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
S
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,813
Likes: 188
Ahh, the late, great, Edward Woodward.

Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
As mentioned in an earlier post, I keep the roof vent partially open to allow hot air to escape. That seems to work, at least as I infer from the inside temperature not being much higher than the outside even in full sunlight on a 115 ℉ day. I also showed in an earlier post that I made a "rain catcher" to hang under the vent to catch any water that comes in. However, there hasn't been a good test of that catcher, until this week. The last two days we received ¾" of rain (hey, it's a desert, that's a lot of rain) and, as can be seen, there's still enough room in the rain catcher for at least another 3".

[Linked Image]

In a year of average annual rainfall, and if there were no evaporation, I'd have to empty it about three times. I could make a bigger rain catcher, but once every four months seems like an acceptable level of required maintenance, unless I take the trailer to the Northwest (Aberdeen Reservoir, WA, averages 12× as much at 130.6")

Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 5,691
Likes: 280
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 5,691
Likes: 280
Any use of the trailer yet, Charlie?

Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7,199
Likes: 402
Originally Posted by Tridentman
Any use of the trailer yet
The desert has been pretending to be England, with monsoon storms blowing in nearly every afternoon for the past week, and the same is forecast for the next five days. However, if it clears up I'm hoping to have my first, relatively short, solo excursion with it next week.

We had a record-breaking non-monsoon last year so the rain is more than welcome. Still, rain or not, summers around here are best spent in the air-conditioned garage rather than riding. Longer excursions into the cool mountains are what I have in mind for summer riding, but trips like that aren't as much fun to do solo. However, until my 9-year-old granddaughter is vaccinated, I'm being antisocial. Although the odds of catching a "breakthrough" infection are small (notwithstanding virulent new variants that are being incubated in the unvaccinated as we speak), we spend a lot of time with the granddaughters so it's a risk I'm not willing to take.

Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 5,691
Likes: 280
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 5,691
Likes: 280
I totally understand. Not a risk worth taking.
I have used mine to bring my Ural sidecar outfit out to our beach house in Montauk Long Island for the rest of the summer.
Earlier I used it to take my classic Triton road race bike (1956 Manx Norton frame with 1939 T100 engine) to the Triumph National Rally in Oley PA and then used it as the HQ office for an Old Bike Night Show I organize in NJ.
Useful in that I slept in the trailer on a folding bed at the Triumph Rally and being a Brit my mobile tea making kit came into its own.
Best of luck when you get mobile with it!

1 member likes this: NYBSAGUY
Page 21 of 21 1 2 19 20 21

Moderated by  Richrd 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Job CycleBritish Cycle SupplyMorries PlaceKlempf British PartsPodtronicVintage MagazineBSA Unit SinglesBritBike SponsorBritish Tools & FastenersBritBike SponsorBritBike Sponsor






© 1996-2021 britbike.com
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5