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I finally got my 68-8024 OEM Ewart petcock to stop leaking. I went through the boiling water trick with the old cork, but that only slowed the leak down. I gave up and threw the old cork away, which was brittle and hard. I purchased new corks from Classic Bike Bits & Bobs in the UK. The brass shaft on my petcock had already been drilled by some previous owner. I used a small punch and drove the brass pin out. I boiled the cork for 3 minutes in water and installed it in the petcock body. I pressed the brass pin back in the knob/piston body with the aid of a smooth jawed vise. Unfortunately, the brass pin was easily pulled out of the knob/piston body, easier than moving the cork when opening and closing. I took everything apart again. I drilled a small hole in the end of the brass pin with a #43 drill bit. I then used a tap for 4-40 threads and threaded the hole I just drilled. I took a ¼ inch long 4-40 stainless hex head cap screw and cut it down to 3/16 inch. I reassembled everything and then installed the screw in the knob screwing it into the previously threaded brass pin. The screw successfully keeps the knob from pulling free of the brass pin. One note – I had a very difficult time drilling the #43 hole in the end of the brass pin. I had to make a special holder for the pin out of wood and held it vertical in my drill press vise for drilling. There was not much metal left after drilling the hole, especially after threading. However, it works well and I no longer have any leaks. Also, I can easily remove the cap screw for any needed future cork replacements. I had initially decided to use red locktite to affix the knob to the brass pin, but I didn’t want a permanent attachment that would preclude me from disassembly in the future for any needed cork replacements.


Current Bike: 1968 Triumph Bonneville T120R, 1969 BSA Victor Special, M1030M1 U.S.M.C. Diesel
Previous British Bikes: 1968 BSA Lightning, 1969 BSA Lightning, 1969 BSA Firebird Scrambler, 1972 BSA B50 Gold Star, 1974 Triumph Trident
Previous Non-British Bikes: 1983 BMW R80RT
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Pictures?

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That's good info, thanks.

As an aside, you definitely have to soak the cork or be a good cork soaker.

Sorry, I couldn't resist laughing



Jon W.


1957 6T Thunderbird 650
1968 T100R Daytona 500
1971 TR6R Tiger 650
1970 BSA A65F 650
1955 Tiger 100 - Project
1971 BSA A65 650 - Project
1972 Norton Commando 750 "Combat"


"Every time I listen to AC/DC, so do my neighbors"

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Originally Posted by LarryLebel
Pictures?
Sorry, I didn't take any photos during the repair as I wasn't certain it would work out. The photo below shows the petcock with the hex-head screw holding the knob in place.

Petcock Repair.JPG

Current Bike: 1968 Triumph Bonneville T120R, 1969 BSA Victor Special, M1030M1 U.S.M.C. Diesel
Previous British Bikes: 1968 BSA Lightning, 1969 BSA Lightning, 1969 BSA Firebird Scrambler, 1972 BSA B50 Gold Star, 1974 Triumph Trident
Previous Non-British Bikes: 1983 BMW R80RT
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I installed the Viton O-rings and thought I had it beat as it sealed perfectly when closed.
Upon tank re-mount however fuel pissed out past the rings in the open position.
So, back to corks.
I am dedicated to the bike, but not enough to soak cork.
And cutting a sealing device just seemed last resort.

I placed the plunger loosely in a vise, took a heat gun to the knurled end and a short, sharp shock with a 3/16' pin punch did the job.
Will clean it all with acetone, and reheat the knurled end to replace.

Any comments on a tiny dab of Loctite?

Ewarts_1.jpg Ewarts_2.jpg

1970 T120R - 'Anton'
1970 Commando - 'Bruno'
1967 T120R - 'Caesar'
1968 Lightning - 'Dora'
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If you don't want to drill the shaft and use a screw like I did, I would definitely recommend Loctite. I removed the knurled knob just like you, but it kept pulling off the shaft without a screw or Loctite. I would try the blue Loctite first as the red Loctite is so strong that I don't think anyone could remove the knurled knob in the future with the red stuff without heating very hot. You will still need to soak the new cork in boiling water for 2 - 3 minutes to get it soft enough to go into the valve body.


Current Bike: 1968 Triumph Bonneville T120R, 1969 BSA Victor Special, M1030M1 U.S.M.C. Diesel
Previous British Bikes: 1968 BSA Lightning, 1969 BSA Lightning, 1969 BSA Firebird Scrambler, 1972 BSA B50 Gold Star, 1974 Triumph Trident
Previous Non-British Bikes: 1983 BMW R80RT
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Thanks Gary.
I picked up a tube of EZ-turn from Aircraft Spruce.
May try that straight up on the bore/cork before going the bunny boiler route.


1970 T120R - 'Anton'
1970 Commando - 'Bruno'
1967 T120R - 'Caesar'
1968 Lightning - 'Dora'
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As MM implied, the EZ-Turn is nonpareil for this application.
Thin smear on front edge of cork and bore.
Didn't cover whole cork as I assume we want the fuel to penetrate the cork at some point.
Very tight and smooth.
All you can ask for.


1970 T120R - 'Anton'
1970 Commando - 'Bruno'
1967 T120R - 'Caesar'
1968 Lightning - 'Dora'

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