Britbike forum

Classic British SparesKlempf British PartsBaxter CycleBritBike Sponsor SteadfastCyclesThe Bonneville ShopLowbrow CustomsSRM EngineeringGirling Classic MotorcycleLucas Classic MotorcycleHepolite PistonsIndustrial tec supply

Upgrade your membership: Premium Membership Gold Membership


New Sponsor post
Cyber Monday Sale - 10% off at The Bonneville Shop
by The Bonneville Shop - 11/29/21 5:34 pm
New FAQ post
How to find my own threads?
by reverb - 11/20/21 3:55 pm
Manuals on DVD - Buy 4 for 3
All 4 DVD Manual
Member Spotlight
Boomer
Boomer
Orygone
Posts: 3,637
Joined: February 2011
ShoutChat
Comment Guidelines: Do post respectful and insightful comments. Don't flame, hate, spam.
Top Posters(30 Days)
Rohan 84
NickL 69
Top Likes Received (30 Days)
kevin 23
Newest Members
bradders, tizianouk, Breeze, FORTYTWO, TomV
11,929 Registered Users
Who's Online Now
1 members (Magnetoman), 18 guests, and 19 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
#851084 06/08/21 6:47 pm
Joined: Mar 2020
Posts: 58
Likes: 2
R
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
R
Joined: Mar 2020
Posts: 58
Likes: 2
I have purchased new exhaust pipes for my 73 thunderbolt. Does anyone have any suggestions on coating the inside of the pipe to help keep them from turning blue?

BSA on eBay
Joined: May 2013
Posts: 8,270
Likes: 191
A
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
A
Joined: May 2013
Posts: 8,270
Likes: 191
Eastwood a sell a high temperature ceramic coating spray. You have to buy the special nozzle then cut off the original hose and fit a longer one (these are aimed more for the car market with short cast manifolds)

They also sell a pre painting prep spray which is probably my nothing much more than IPA and Acetone but I still bought this anyway. I wasn’t going to risk the product not adhering properly for couple of quid on the prep.

There’s enough in the tin for a few passes, I kept running through until the tin emptied. Letting it dry in between.

If you go this route, do it well away from anything else. You get quite a bit come out of the nozzle, but you need it to, it doesn’t reach quite everywhere so once you’ve given it a pass. Cap the ends off and really swish it around the pipe. If like me you let it run out of one end accidentally it sticks like bird muck on fresh linen (I have a garage door which nice bright silver paint from my accident) I got some off but what dried is impossible to remove without removing the paint off the garage door also.

Hope this helps.


Now let’s all have a beer beerchug

68’ A65 Lightning “clubman”
71’ A65 823 Thunderbolt (now rebuilt)
67’ D10 sportsman (undergoing restoration)
68’ D14 trials (undergoing transformation)

Joined: Mar 2012
Posts: 260
Likes: 6
F
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
F
Joined: Mar 2012
Posts: 260
Likes: 6
Russ, following is an excerpt from a post/thread I responded to back in 2018:
Richard, I have done several bikes pipes using this approach. Harley Davidson used to make a solution that was a milky white color, about the consistency of very heavy cream, and also had a sandy, gritty texture. After coating the pipe, I put it in the oven at about 175°, for about 30 minutes, then I coated it again, and again in the oven. The product put about 1/16-1/8" of thick coating similar to ceramic but probably not as durable. Pipes have kept the chrome look for almost 10 years, and I have no complaints as Steve Erickson described with it coming loose. I am sure the cleanliness of the inside of the pipes has a lot to do with this. I applied it on new pipes. Sadly the Harley product is no longer available. But I have also used a product from Kreem, the same people that make the notorious fuel tank sealer kits; it is a blue colored product and is very similar to the stuff I used from Harley, but it didn't seem to work quite as well. Still I have no complaints from using either one. Both products have kept the pipes from bluing.
Fullminator

Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 1,079
Likes: 72
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 1,079
Likes: 72
I haven't had good luck with any pipe coating. I think some pipes are thicker and chroming done correctly or not. Pipes done right stay nicer.


Bill
1974 Norton Commando
1966 Lightning
1965 Lightning Rocket
1966 Norton Atlas
1967 Norton Atlas
1948 Panhead
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 1,988
Likes: 60
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 1,988
Likes: 60
The stuff Fullminator talks about was called "Dyno" I recall. My problems with it were most likely surface prep related... though I preferred to blame Harley.

I think Eastwood makes a coating, maybe someone has some feedback on it?
...oops, Allan already did post on it, 'scuse me...

Last edited by Steve Erickson; 06/10/21 12:20 am.
Joined: May 2013
Posts: 8,270
Likes: 191
A
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
A
Joined: May 2013
Posts: 8,270
Likes: 191
Originally Posted by Steve Erickson
The stuff Fullminator talks about was called "Dyno" I recall. My problems with it were most likely surface prep related... though I preferred to blame Harley.

I think Eastwood makes a coating, maybe someone has some feedback on it?

As previously mentioned.

Originally Posted by Allan G
Eastwood a sell a high temperature ceramic coating spray. You have to buy the special nozzle then cut off the original hose and fit a longer one (these are aimed more for the car market with short cast manifolds)

They also sell a pre painting prep spray which is probably my nothing much more than IPA and Acetone but I still bought this anyway. I wasn’t going to risk the product not adhering properly for couple of quid on the prep.

There’s enough in the tin for a few passes, I kept running through until the tin emptied. Letting it dry in between.

If you go this route, do it well away from anything else. You get quite a bit come out of the nozzle, but you need it to, it doesn’t reach quite everywhere so once you’ve given it a pass. Cap the ends off and really swish it around the pipe. If like me you let it run out of one end accidentally it sticks like bird muck on fresh linen (I have a garage door which nice bright silver paint from my accident) I got some off but what dried is impossible to remove without removing the paint off the garage door also.

Hope this helps.

It isn’t as thick as the Harley stuff mentioned above and I have yet to run the bike with it, but being an Eastwood product I am quite hopeful.


Originally Posted by Beach
I think some pipes are thicker and chroming done correctly or not. Pipes done right stay nicer.

Right on, original pipes were 1.5mm thick, the Armours pipes are about the same thickness and they do stay looking like fresh chrome
For longer. Most after market pipes are 1mm thick and these will turn golden quickly regardless of how lean your mixture Is or how rich it might be.


Now let’s all have a beer beerchug

68’ A65 Lightning “clubman”
71’ A65 823 Thunderbolt (now rebuilt)
67’ D10 sportsman (undergoing restoration)
68’ D14 trials (undergoing transformation)

Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,972
Likes: 47
G
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
G
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,972
Likes: 47
I have had all of my pipes internal ceramic heat coated. It has to be done before the pipe is used. That is easy on new repop pipes or NOS pipes. I've had it done to used pipes after they have been re-chromed as the plater facility tank stripping process cleans out the interior built-up carbon and rust. The internal heat coating helps reduce the blueing & browning/yellowing of chrome pipes.

The company I used is Northwest Industrial Coatings (NIC) in Oregon. https://www.nicindustries.com/ They developed the heat and slick coating process and powders. They no longer do the coating work, now sticking to manufacturing and selling the powders. For looks they have 1000's of color choices.

When I was building and racing experimental aircraft, they used to use us as experiments for their R&D. The engines I built had both heat and slick coatings on the internals. Slick coatings on the sides of the pistons, and heat coatings on the tops. Any friction surfaces in the engine got the slick coatings, ie cam, crank, pistons, rods, piston pins, gears, valves, valve seats & guides, lifters, pushrod ends, even the bearings. It was like a bearing on a bearing. Very slippery and durable stuff.

They would heat coat the inside of the aircraft headers as well as coat the outside for heat and for looks in order to help reduce the aircraft inside cowl temperatures which were fiberglass as the pipes were, in some cases, within a 1/4" of the cowls. It was a challenge for them as EGT's are hotter on aircraft engines than vehicles, and the heat coatings were initially not holding up. They finally figured it all out.


1967 BSA Wasp
1967 BSA Hornet (West Coast Model)
1967 BSA Hornet (East Coast Model)
1968 BSA Firebird Scrambler
1968 BSA Spitfire Mark IV
1965 Cyclone Competition Build

Moderated by  Allan G, Jon W. Whitley 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Job CycleBritish Cycle SupplyMorries PlaceKlempf British PartsPodtronicVintage MagazineBSA Unit SinglesBritBike SponsorBritish Tools & FastenersBritBike SponsorBritBike Sponsor






© 1996-2021 britbike.com
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5