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#847489 04/29/21 6:06 pm
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I've done it before but this time it's no go (1968 model). I've fitted some dual rate springs which are a bit firmer than the old (soft) ones. However, the difficulty is trying to slide the staunchions up through the yokes without them being pushed back down into the sliders, and even if they don't the top-cap threads are a long way off the top yoke. So, are there any techniques to overcome the problem? Surprisingly there's nothing on Youtube about re-installation.


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Do you have a fork stanchion puller? You can buy elaborate ones which have various threads on, it goes through the top yoke and then with a “big nut” it pulls up the puller through the yoke and brings the stanchion with it.

You can make a DIY version with some threaded rod and an old nut with the hex ground off, a hole drilled through the middle and the threaded rod a fixed to it.
You can just pull the rod but I find a decent sized socket and a large penny washer on top of it, coupled with a nut and you can then wind the nut down the thread and pull the stanchion through that way. When it’s through far enough tighten the pinch bolt.

Don’t forget the rubber dust seal and metal ring before installation.


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Never heard of one till your reply! Strange how I managed it before! Thanks.

Isn't the rubber washer used to prevent the rod from dropping down, I can't see how dust can enter the tube when the cap nut is on?


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The rubber dust seals and metal ring go on the outside of the tube and thus inside the fork covers.

47-5064 & 47-5065


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1967 BSA Hornet (West Coast Model)
1967 BSA Hornet (East Coast Model)
1968 BSA Firebird Scrambler
1968 BSA Spitfire Mark IV
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I do it the other way round. Put the tubes into the yoke, fit the seal holders etc. , then the bushes (compress spring at this stage), then screw sliders into the seal holders. Bit less cumbersome if you dont have a puller of the type Allan describes.

Cheers
Ray


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Originally Posted by BrizzoBrit
I do it the other way round. Put the tubes into the yoke, fit the seal holders etc. , then the bushes (compress spring at this stage), then screw sliders into the seal holders. Bit less cumbersome if you dont have a puller of the type Allan describes.

Cheers
Ray

How do you tighten up with the BSA style fork? Or do you use a rubber strap wrench? (The type that help remove jam jar lids). It’s easier on the triumph type forks with the Y shaped peg spanner.


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Can anyone with a photo of the BSA gland nut wrench for the forks show Allan a picture and explain how, and WHEN, it's used?

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Originally Posted by Irish Swede
Can anyone with a photo of the BSA gland nut wrench for the forks show Allan a picture and explain how, and WHEN, it's used?
These are the BSA style forks that I’m referring to. So if you care to explain how you fit these sliders when the stanchions are already mounted in the yokes since you protest to know?


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If you own more than one old British motorcycle or ever plan to, the cost of the fork puller tool kit will be justified as it makes a difficult job much easier to perform solo. We also carry the seal holder tool for BSA, 61-3005, which works only when the fork tubes are out of the fork yokes, as it slides down over the fork tube.

-Dave


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In the old days before I knew better, I installed the sliders onto the stanchion tubes in place a couple of times. It's doable, but tricky, as you say, to compress the springs and get the seal holders started on without buggering the threads. If everything is in good shape, they can be tightened by hand, but if you use a strap wrench, be sure to grab the seal holder at the bottom where it is not hollow.

Of course it's better to pull the assembled forks up into the yokes. Buy the special tool, or you can make one if you have a spare top nut to sacrifice. (Grind off the hex part so it fits into the yoke, drill and run a threaded rod through the center, add washers and nuts to make a puller).


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To Allan G.: "How do you fit these sliders when the stanchions are already mounted?"

The answer is; You can't.

The BSA tool is a tube with two bars for handles welded across from each other. There is a lug on each side of the bottom of that tube,
Those lugs fit into the bottoms of the two notches in the inside bottom of the gland nut (the chrome seal holder) to screw it onto the slider.

The stanchions must be off the bike to get this done.

The tool is slid down the stanchion, the lugs on the tool engage the notches in the gland nut, then turn the tool to screw on the gland nut.

This is intended to be a WORK BENCH JOB, not an "on-the-bike job>"

Any more questions or saucy comments?

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Irish I’ll send you a pm


Now let’s all have a beer beerchug

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Originally Posted by Irish Swede
To Allan G.: "How do you fit these sliders when the stanchions are already mounted?"

The answer is; You can't.

The BSA tool is a tube with two bars for handles welded across from each other. There is a lug on each side of the bottom of that tube,
Those lugs fit into the bottoms of the two notches in the inside bottom of the gland nut (the chrome seal holder) to screw it onto the slider.

The stanchions must be off the bike to get this done.

The tool is slid down the stanchion, the lugs on the tool engage the notches in the gland nut, then turn the tool to screw on the gland nut.

This is intended to be a WORK BENCH JOB, not an "on-the-bike job>"

Any more questions or saucy comments?
Thinking that's what Allan was saying.


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Precisely wink


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OK, maybe I've misled. Late style shuttle valve forks with 97-3633 seal holder. 68-70 if I'm correct. Has the holes for tool with the pins.

I know nothing about early forks (yet). Apologies, should have been more specific.

Ray

Last edited by BrizzoBrit; 05/02/21 10:37 am. Reason: more detail

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Originally Posted by BrizzoBrit
OK, maybe I've misled. Late style shuttle valve forks with 97-3633 seal holder. 68-70 if I'm correct. Has the holes for tool with the pins.

I know nothing about early forks (yet). Apologies, should have been more specific.

Ray

Nothing to apologise for Ray, as Mark highlighted it is possible to do it the same way (although it isn’t easy trying to the the threads started)


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Mine is a '68 model with the 97-2514 seal holder and separate spindle caps as shown on Draganfly '68 parts list.

Whether export models varied somewhat I don't know.


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I have found it works better upside down ( bit messy )
Stand on the tool
drop the fork over the tool and rotate till the tool engages the notches
Slip a tommy bar through the axle hole , press down very hard while turning the tommy bar
A lot easier than trying to press down on the very short arms of the tool while turning it


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I would caution here that these seal holders dont need to be overly tight. The thread is very fine and the holder itself is mostly hollow sheet steel that can easily be deformed. Just snug it up is all that is required.
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Must admit I did overtighten mine to stop oil bleeding through the joint. Perhaps there is something that prevents this without gumming up the fine threads.


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Originally Posted by semprini
Must admit I did overtighten mine to stop oil bleeding through the joint. Perhaps there is something that prevents this without gumming up the fine threads.
String as is mentioned in the service Manual. That's all I've ever used on them.


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For 1970 they introduced an O ring to replace the string.

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Originally Posted by Beach
Originally Posted by semprini
Must admit I did overtighten mine to stop oil bleeding through the joint. Perhaps there is something that prevents this without gumming up the fine threads.
String as is mentioned in the service manual. That's all I've ever used on them.
I told this story before; I hope I'm not boring the same audience: The service Manual states "#5 cotton twine". I went into a hardware store (my local Agway) and asked for "#5 cotton twine". The store clerk looked at me like I was from Mars. So I grabbed something from the shelf that looked appropriate, a kind of stiff brown woven cotton twine. For good measure I dipped it in melted wax; I don't know if that really helped. The main thing is that it's big enough to fill that recess on the fork leg where the threads end.

The O-ring probably works better, but obviously requires disassembly to install.


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I have found on a couple of occasions that the O rings break on final tightening, so I always use string. No 5 twine is actually the commonly available parcel twine or butchers twine.. Most places selling stationery have it. I've not used the Rayon type but used both cotton and hemp versions coated in Wellseal before use; seems to work.


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Personally I followed the advice of Mike Waller on his Britannia Motors YouTube channel. I used PTFE thread paste, the one that is good or grease and oil. made it easy to assemble, had no leaks, and was easy to take apart after I eventually realized that the damn stanchion was bent.

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