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My dad was a racer and loved singles so I was around 500cc (30.50) singles from the time I could walk—Model 18CS AJS, Ariel Red Hunter, Gold Star Catalina, a couple Velocettes for the street, etc. The rules in our house were, “if you can pick it up if it’s lying on the ground, and if you can start it, then you can ride it.” So I learned really early, like 11 or 12 years old and well under 100 lbs soaking wet, how to pick them up, and how to start them all— how much tickler, valve lifter or not, where to put the piston, where to hold the throttle, how to use my body weight and momentum to roll over the kickstarter with minimal actual weight, each bike was different on every detail, and knowing how got me off a Honda 50 trail bike and onto British iron that much sooner. Fun to think about after all these years, and that stuff still helps make starting my DBD 34 Gold Star a “mostly” reliable process. And it makes starting a twin easy peasey by comparison.

Dad and I also raced cars starting in the early and mid 60’s, and it takes the same sort of touch to get a hopped up car with highly modified SU carburetors or 6 Stromberg 97s started—except it often took two people, LOL. Yup, a whole different deal from hitting the button on an electric start fuel injected engine, and a lot more fun.

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The land speed racing tracks I take the bikes to also have cars. Almost all the cars are extensively modified, some with electronic injection..If you think bolting on injection and going fast is easy,with a modified. engine you are mistaken. The car guys have laptops hooked up after most every run adjusting fuel maps and making changes . It's no different than carbs other than your fingers don't smell like gas .Drag racers claim it's easier to make power with carbs on all out racing gas engines because electronic injection has a very long learning curve.


79 T140D, 89 Honda 650NT ,61 A10 .On a bike you can out run the demons
"I don't know what the world may need
But a V8 engine is a good start for me
Think I'll drive to find a place, to be surly"
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Lannis, yes those little East German bikes are quite addictive. beerchug

MZ two stroke normal starting routine.

From cold
Turn on fuel.
Don't turn on ignition yet
Put choke (fuel enrichener) on
Kick over twice
Turn off choke
Turn on ignition
Kick over
Should start first or second kick with barely any throttle.

From warm
Turn on fuel and ignition
Kick over till it starts

After a long lay up, follow cold start procedure but leave on choke till it fires up


If you don't follow these procedures you can be kicking the thing over all day and it won't start.


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Originally Posted by linker48x
The rules in our house were, “if you can pick it up if it’s lying on the ground, and if you can start it, then you can ride it.”
So, I need to sell the BMW cause I darn sure can't pick it up when it falls over.

That's one reason I put Mk2s on my Bonnie. Flip the enrichment levers, turn the key on, kick and it fires.


It's not a bug, it's 'character.'

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Originally Posted by linker48x
The rules in our house were, “if you can pick it up if it’s lying on the ground, and if you can start it, then you can ride it.”

These later days of my life I can manage two out of three with that Enfield.
Starting & riding no problem, in the unlikely event of it lying down I would stand no chance.
The Flash & a Box, now that is a different tale, I can start it, get on it, ride it, stop it and get off it with no danger of embarassment laughing


BeezaBryan

He knows not where he's going, For the ocean will decide,
Its not the destination, It's the glory of the ride (Edward Monkton, Zen Dog)





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Yeah, even carburetors are becoming mysterious Olde Teche.

Some of the reactions to my GW converted from 4 carbs to 1 had me as some kinda Guru!
It aint easy, but it aint rocket surgery.


When singing "Kung Fu Fighting" is outlawed, only outlaws will sing "Kung Fu Fighting"
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I'm not sure why any of this should come as a shock to anyone. Those of us who are silly enough to own and drive/ride vintage vehicles are in a minority, there simply is no need for this kind of knowledge to be anything other than exclusive.

I served my time in the mid to late 90's, we learnt about points ignition but not because it was current technology it was simply a good base for understanding the electronic ignitions that were current. Nowadays both systems are considered and are for the most part completely irrelevant. I quite often have to teach mechanics in their 30's how to set points and then watch them glaze over as I try to explain setting dwell with a multimeter. They simply have no use for the information past that one job that I just did for them!

Ask a driving instructor about cadence braking, chances are they will have no clue, it's irrelevant in a modern world. So why confuse people more than you have to?


And pray that there's intelligent life somewhere up in space
'Cause there's bugger all down here on Earth'

An interesting point given recent events.

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I taught my son how to drive a manual transmission at age 14 on my Series 2A Land Rover. It does have synchro 1st or 2nd, He learned how to "double clutch" up and down. I told him after he mastered that everything else he'll drive will be easy... and boring.

I thought he would be one of very few who could drive a stick to school at sixteen. The joke was on me, he was one of very few who bothered to get a license and want to drive any car in while in high school period.

I do enjoy the "dance" of starting the Victor wherever I take it on my errands. For me, it makes me appreciate the ride more. I really relish the one kick start, it makes me feel Cary Grant type smooth. I have to admit though, many times I probably come off more like Chris Farley.


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My wife was a "farm girl," and learned to drive manual transmissions at age 13. She has always preferred them.

Her last Saturn, with a five-speed, had to go in for routine service on a Monday.
The service manager, exclaimed: "Thank God you brought it in on Monday, because this is the ONLY day our mechanic who can drive 'stick' is here!"

(What a sad world this has become.)

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Originally Posted by Rusty Goose
I thought he would be one of very few who could drive a stick to school at sixteen. The joke was on me, he was one of very few who bothered to get a license and want to drive any car in while in high school period.

The youngest, 19, has zero interest in getting a drivers license. Perhaps they are the smart ones...

Last edited by rick e.; 04/19/21 5:35 pm.

"Back in the garage with my [***] detector
Carbon monoxide making sure it's effective...
----THE CLASH-----

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Lannis Offline OP
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Originally Posted by rick e.
Originally Posted by Rusty Goose
I thought he would be one of very few who could drive a stick to school at sixteen. The joke was on me, he was one of very few who bothered to get a license and want to drive any car in while in high school period.

The youngest, 19, has zero interest in getting a drivers license. Perhaps they are the smart ones...

They could be. I never knew ANYONE like that when I was a boy ... the day I turned 15 years, 8 months, and 1 day (legal driving age in Virginia at that time), I was camped on the courthouse steps waiting for them to open. So was everyone else I knew.

It's a rural area, so there was (and is) no way of getting around except in a car or on a bike. I suppose that if I had lived in a city, I could have passed up the driver's license, and taken the bus or train or rode a bicycle everywhere. When I lived in Denver for a year, I did all my work commuting and shopping on foot, bicycle, or the light rail, didn't need a car. But you have to live in a city to do that.

Otherwise, Mommy and Daddy have to take you everywhere you want to go, and we know THAT ain't happenin' at age 19!

Lannis


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Carburetors were becoming old technology in the 80's. My '78 VW Bus was fuel injected. I remember at my grandfather's funeral in '84 my older brother was supposed to drive my aunt's Mercedes to the service. He couldn't start it until I told him to keep his big foot off the accelerator pedal. laughing
By the time I took driver's education they had stopped teaching how to shift. Dad gave me private lessons in Mom's Beetle. I drove almost nothing but manual shifts for 30 years.
The weekend of the big Nashville flood in 2010 we had a gig in Oklahoma City. Of course, all Ryder had available was a straight shift truck. My driving partner was only good once he got to the entrance ramp. We had to detour on back roads to get back to Nashville because I-40 was closed. 18 hours in the driver's seat because the next generation can't shift.


It's not a bug, it's 'character.'

72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"
92 BMW K100rs "Gustav"
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