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MikeG
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Originally Posted by DavidP
...valves adjusted at clearances guaranteed to cause valve clatter...
hee hee

Just how my '67 Bonnie is (just fired it up yesterday for the first time in almost 13 years). Let it warm up on a nice ride and it quiets down.


GrandPaul (does not use emoticons)
Author of the book "Old Bikes"
Too many bikes to list, mostly Triumph & Norton, a BSA, & some Japanese
"The Iron in your blood should be Vintage"
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Today I put the rocker cover back on. I used to think that the single cover was a good idea, that is until I tried to put it on lining up four studs at once. Then having to use my specially modified 7/16" ring spanner to tighten those little dome nuts.
Then it was on to mounting the carbs. The first one wasn't too difficult, but getting to the inner nut on the second is a complete pain. Can't be done with the rocker oil feed pipe in place. Even then it doesn't help that BSA used thick lock nuts. Damn near impossible to turn because of interference with the carb body. They could have specified some thin jam nuts, but NOOOO!
I can only stand about an hour of this in one setting. I'll wait until tomorrow to install the ridiculous head steady.


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72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"
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With spring in the air and a nice 10° C we took the two R's out for a proper ride.
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

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Today was the annual get the bikes out from winter hibernation day! Rode the Hinckley Trophy and Thruxton. Fired up and exercised the Meriden T140V and TR5T. One of the Winter projects was some carb work (minor) on the Bonneville that rewarded me with the return of the elusive one kick start! Yay! The Rapide was a bit hesitant for the Spring revival (beauty sleep)...but with a few kind words, the Beast is as fit as a fiddle.

Spent the morning with Tridentman at an automotive memorabilia swap meet helping to promote the June old bike night here in Northern NJ.

There were three other Japanese gems revived as well but I will not report on that since they run as effortlessly as the Hinckley motorcycles and who wants to hear that!

A great spring day.😁

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Originally Posted by DavidP
I finished putting the top end back on my A65. Say what you will about Triumph push rod tubes but it beats peering down a dark tunnel to get the push rods on the correct tappets.
Got the exhaust rocker shaft in and valves adjusted at clearances guaranteed to cause valve clatter. Only thing left is the rocker cover and that bitch of a head steady.

David, I've been thinking about what you wrote and at the same time putting my BSA back together after a head gasket replacement. I will admit, as many times as I've assembled the rockers, it still taxes my small motor skills and patience. However, it's still not as frustrating as the three or four Triumph uppers I've done, hoping that I had just the right thickness of squish washers under the pushrod tubes, such that it would neither leak nor distort the head on tightening, getting and keeping everything lined up "just so" to get the head on, then getting the rocker boxes on over the pushrods without the pushrods tipping out of place. And then, although you don't have to remove rockers to re-torque the head, Triumphs often require two or three re-torques.

I do sympathize with you regarding the OIF head steady; I've worked on a couple of those too. Thankfully, mine have all been dry-frame models. If you can find a way to mount an earlier-type head steady to the frame, I think the lug for it remained on the '71-'72 heads. Someone here (or on FB?) did that because he had an earlier head and rocker cover, working off the horn bracket (with the horn mounted elsewhere).


Mark Z

'65(lower)/'66(upper, wheels, front end, controls)/'67(seat, exhaust, fuel tank, headlamp)/'70(frame) A65 Bitsa.
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Generally it's just a matter of having the correct gasket set for the year and model of Triumph. The push rod seals will be correct unless some fool shaved the head or you stick the wrong copper head gasket on a Trident. My push rod tubes never leaked until I used a copper head gasket, and this was long before I learned to check for proper 'squish' on the seals.
Installing push rods is always a bit fiddly, but at least I can see that they are on the correct tappet before I lower the tube in place.
Installing rocker boxes is only difficult on the triples. One must hold the rockers in contact with the push rods while snugging up the bolts. Pretty much the same on the BSA while fitting the head.
I always check the head torque and valve adjustment after the first ride. If the ones I can get to are still good then I don't need to remove the rocker arm. They usually are, but they usually are on a Triumph twin also. A triple always requires at least three re-torques, just the nature of the beast.

Over the last two days I stripped the black VHT paint off the Trident header. I found that I preferred the look of the bare metal, so I re-coated with VHT clear.
The A65 is ready to go as soon as the new rear brake rod shows up in the mail.
I might take it to BIBR. With any luck I'll come home with money in my pocket and an empty trailer. laugh


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72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"
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I finally got around to plumbing in my new MAP Cycle oil filter. The homemade bracket mounts to the two lugs for the tool carrier. I believe you could modify a tool carrier to serve the purpose, but I don't have a tool carrier for this bike. The filter can be pulled out for element replacement simply by removing the nut on the back of the P-clamp bolt.The spigots on the filter are 3/8" diameter, so I had to employ "reducing splices" to bring the hose size down to 5/16".
[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]


Mark Z

'65(lower)/'66(upper, wheels, front end, controls)/'67(seat, exhaust, fuel tank, headlamp)/'70(frame) A65 Bitsa.
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Originally Posted by Mark Z
IThe spigots on the filter are 3/8" diameter, so I had to employ "reducing splices" to bring the hose size down to 5/16".
It's the same with the Norton filter adapters. I found that if I put the heat gun on some 8mm line for a few seconds I can force that onto the 3/8" spigot.
Nice, clean installation, Mark. laugh


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72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"
92 BMW K100rs "Gustav"
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Thanks David; I have no side panels for this bike, so what I can't hide I have to make at least acceptable-looking. This was actually an improvement in that it covered up the ugly side of that rear fender. In retrospect, I should have bought more of those attractive hose clamps and replaced my old worm-screw clamps.


Mark Z

'65(lower)/'66(upper, wheels, front end, controls)/'67(seat, exhaust, fuel tank, headlamp)/'70(frame) A65 Bitsa.
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I removed the oil thermostat from my Trident. I want to see how this affects oil pressure. Perhaps the designers had "over-cooled" oil in mind?
I also took the opportunity to remove the oil cooler, drain and clean the exterior.
Good thing I bought a big roll of 7/16" oil line. laugh

Update: I took the bike out for a ride on Tuesday. Removing the thermostat gave me 20 lbs better oil pressure, but oil temperature was only 140 degrees when I got home. That's measured in the oil tank, I still say that it gets hot enough to burn off condensation while it's in the engine.
Today I replaced the oil feed and return lines from under the engine. It's been leaking down there and the bottom return line is the only one I didn't replace when I bought the bike.
The cat seems to be confused by all the kitty litter under the bike. laughing

Last edited by DavidP; 04/23/21 4:07 am. Reason: Update

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Secured the speedometer face that had vibrates loose. Had a couple of near perfect screws in my tool box. Now to order a new lens (or use the one out of an old tach I have). Brian

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Well, let's see, it has been a while since I posted. The snow melted in Alaska but it is still low to mid 40's most of the day, and I made the mistake of figuring out the wind chill to be -19 at 50 mph, the one day I went riding (it was danged cold) so I haven't really ridden much yet, so it is still good garage weather.

On my '79 T140D, I had slipping problems with the 7 plate clutch. Turns out I have been using a super slippery moly grease in the garage, and I used that on the rollers in the clutch, and it got on and soaked into the clutch fiber plates with its special slickum. It pretty much reacted like I had put some kind of super slippery modern oil in the primary--the clutch slipped. Had to fix that, obviously. Put new T140 springs on it, and while I was working on the clutch, I replaced the complete clutch center. No grease on the rollers this time. It truly works nice now, perhaps the best Triumph clutch I have ever had.

I mounted my AMAL Mk 2s, with Euro jetting (3-1/2 cutaway slide, 106 needle jets, 2A1 needle in the middle, 15 pilot, 35 choke jet, 120 mains, removed the air jet, and some Uni sock air filters) and got a chance to ride it to see how they worked. Wow, what a difference, the JRC Keihin flatslides had worked nicely, but this set of Mk 2s worked really, really well, with better power everywhere bottom to top. I can see why people like these carbs. I have a thread on the forks so I will do that there.

Also on the T140D, the change from a 47 (4.7:1 ratio) to a 45 (4.5:1 ratio) tooth rear sprocket was nice, it is getting the gear ratio closer to what I wanted. Everything is a compromise, and still gets away from stop signs well, but it is a little fast in second gear in the neighborhood at 3000 (I like to ride at least at 3000 to keep the battery from running down). On the other hand it is maybe not quite as relaxed at higher speeds as I wanted, so I will try a 21 tooth counter at some point. That will give me something like a 4.3 ratio, which is about what I think I would like to try. Oh, it got a headlight bulb too--I always ride with the lights on and they go quickly.

Finally, the drain plug stripped so I replaced the sump plate with a Charlie’s filter, the British one using a modified stock plate and an acorn nut projecting out the bottom. That nut hits the center stand—any recommendations how to solve that?

The 70 T120--same 7 plate clutch slipping problem, same cause, same fix. Sheesh, I will never use that slippery moly grease on clutch rollers again--nothing but JASO 2 oil.... And again, while I was in there, I replaced the clutch center.

I think I already posted on most of the winter's fixes on the 68 Spitfire Mk 4, so I'll wait on that until I ride it. It also got a new clutch center. All of them were grooved and the rubbers were all dead, it was time, and I was tired of the way these 50 year old clutches work (or don't work) in that condition. It also just got an oil change and new battery FWIW.

The 73 Commando awaits the stand getting empty. I am not sure I want to spend the time now to replace the front isolastic gaiters, that is a sort of major job, maybe that will happen next winter. I got a new stainless fender for it the other day--the original rear fender has been broken since I got this bike in 1989, and I thought I would finally fix it, since it has continued to crack and now it would need welding if I kept the old one. And it needs a headlight bulb, and the warning light assimilator, and a fresh bolt for the sidestand. But then again, I might just ride it like it is until fall and do all this then (except the headlight).

Last edited by linker48x; 05/05/21 4:28 am.
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put new AMAL 932s on the Commando..........more fun than i could skeercely stand


1972 Triumph T120
1968 BSA A65
1968 MGB Roadster
1979 Chevrolet Camaro Berlinetta
1969 Honda Mini Trail
1939 farmall f30 tractor
2004 Honda Shadow Aero

1975 yamaha xs650b
1972 Norton commando
2 olive drab WWII military bicycle replicas
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Originally Posted by raf940
put new amal 932s on the commando..........more fun than i could skeercely stand

One of the more difficult and least fun jobs in all Brit bikedom. Any skin left on your knuckles?

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gotta love getting that last allenhead manifold bolt in


1972 Triumph T120
1968 BSA A65
1968 MGB Roadster
1979 Chevrolet Camaro Berlinetta
1969 Honda Mini Trail
1939 farmall f30 tractor
2004 Honda Shadow Aero

1975 yamaha xs650b
1972 Norton commando
2 olive drab WWII military bicycle replicas
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