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Jon W. Whitley
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#844898 04/02/21 3:47 am
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I am replacing bearings on a TLS front wheel from ball to sealed bearings for the 1st time. Should/Could I eliminate the inside "grease retainer" 37-1481? Any tricks to installing the dust cap/grease retainer other than finesse with a socket or brass bar stock? So do you use the spindle to do this work as the Manual says? On aftermarket pre-unit outer dustcaps, they always seem to have excessive OD vs stock? Resulting in destruction?
In this case, I am working on my 77 year-old father's 1958 T110, understand the liability and concern.

Last edited by Oil Changer; 04/02/21 3:49 am.
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Hi Oil Changer, The retainers also act as spacers to position bearings where they should be. There can be spacer as well. So look what comes out. Very important on the right side as they locate the bearing left to right, which effects wheel left to right on axle. So you have to keep all those. You can leave the inner grease retainer out on snap ring side, but I always put it back in.

TLS on '58?? Not sure what you are working on?? Parts book doesn't show grease retainers on inner side of bearings.

I don't know it matters how you install grease retainers, shop Manual way or your way. Removing the one side takes bearing out with axle. I have lots of driver tools so I use them. A larger driver for left bearing removal might distort grease retainer less?? I've not used the axle for a driver per se since I have drivers or use sockets on extension.

Some of the retainers can be deformed on removal. If you can straighten them, which is possible, you can reuse them. I've straightened them & they worked fine. I probably wouldn't order them until you do tear down. I expect you can straighten them. Only the inner left takes the bending for the most part.

The sealed bearings I've been involved with are exactly the same dimensions as the original un sealed. So a straightforward job.

On assembly shop Manual has you install inner grease retainer, bearing, outer grease retainer, snap ring. Then... drive on grease retainer to move the assembly against the snap ring with axle. This can again bend the grease retainer you just straightened... I go easy on the inner retainer, not all the way in, then bearing not quite all the way in, finally carefully fit/drive outer retainer pushing bearing & inner retainer just slightly more. Just enough to fit snap ring. Then you don't really need to move the bearing back against the snap ring. It's already there. Just a thought.

Even though bearings are sealed, I smear grease retainers & axle with thin layer of Staylube water proof boat trailer bearing grease. Keeps things from rusting down the road.

I used to drive off the retainer nut with a punch since I didn't have proper tool. That's stupid. You can get the pin wrench tool for like $30 on ebay. Or make one. I buggered up the pin holes. I'm ashamed now. You should do better than I did.

Friend of mine made tool to hold axle from spinning removing brake plate if nut is tight. A block of metal with hole drilled in it size of axle. Cut slot in block & used pinch bolts such slot allows block to pinch tight to axle. Has holding handle attached to block. Works super good. Another for disc brake axle. That nut can be really tight.
Don


1973 Tiger 750
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Thanks Don. Great information. This particular bike was upgraded along the way with a later (69-70) TLS many years ago. Even though I'm going back together with sealed bearings, I'll probably install the inner grease retainer for he next guy, even though that part doesn't appear to have anything to do with alignment. (it has no shoulder on the ID like the outer) I agree about the proper spanner for the left hand nut and while I have the tool, the guys before me on this did not. The Manual doesn't describe preload or anything out of the ordinary, so I'll just go back together the way it came apart and the description of the later Manual. I have plenty of sockets and bushing drivers of assorted diameters and will go easy and try not to monkey-hammer it.

Last edited by Oil Changer; 04/02/21 1:46 pm.
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If the brake plate nut is tight you can use the clamp at the bottom of the RH fork leg to hold the spindle. Not my idea, cedit to a TrumphRat contributor, it works very well.

Chris
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Great idea. Thanks. This one wasn't tight.
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I use a spare slider to act as an axle clamp. Helps both tightening and loosening.

I find the the axle nut comes loose easily allowing the backing plate to 'rattle' on the peg on the fork. Very annoying while sitting idling. I use a bit of blue loctite on that nut these days. Also check the nut doesn't bottom on the thread before clamping the backing plate to the bearing. If it does a thin washer under the nut is very helpful as this allows the backing plate to be clamped on the bearing inner frace and avoids the dreaded 'backing plate rattle'. Its tricky to find one that fits the step on the back of the nut.

You dont, but if you needed info on assembly order try here https://hermit.cc/tmc/parts/axle_parts/rear.htm An awesome resource from a forum member.

Cheers
Ray


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So bearings arrived today and installed all the parts according to the workshop Manual. I was about to add the braking plate assembly and fixing nut, decided to check the tightness of the axle and found that the axle can move from side to side about 3/16" inside the hub. Does the brake plate and fixing nut decide where the final axle position is by design?

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Yes, the collar on the spindle fits against the inner spool of the RH bearing and the brake plate and nut pull it tight.

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Thanks all. This is the bike in question, ready to go.


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