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Originally Posted by DavidP
Got the gearbox together yesterday.
Did the primary today. I'd almost forgotten how much I hate assembling the primary on a twin. Stick 20 rollers to the hub with thick grease, slowly lower the chain wheel onto the hub making sure not to displace any rollers, drive the shock drive onto the hub, then hold the whole assembly together and try to line up the key with the hub while trying to align the splines on the engine sprocket. With luck you won't hear that faint tink and find a roller in the bottom of the case. Now keep holding the assembly in place while you struggle to get the thick washer into the shock drive and screw on the nut before it all falls apart.
Clutch plates are back in. Just need to install the outer gearbox cover and make sure I indexed properly.

Gee David, the way I do it is 1. Hub (sleeve?) with key. 2. Chainwheel, chain, and crank sprocket together. 3. Rollers. 4. Cush drive. Piece o' cake... or are we not talking about an A65?


Mark Z

'65(lower)/'66(upper, wheels, front end, controls)/'67(seat, exhaust, fuel tank, headlamp)/'70(frame) A65 Bitsa.
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Changed the triple trees on my B50 to the wider disc brake ones and started taking measurements for installing my 230 mm Grimeca 4-leading shoe front brake. Unfortunately, while doing so, my aim with the dead blow hammer on the fork cap (to loosen the taper) was a bit off and I broke the glass in the speedo. Oh well, its only money!

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I took the last ride of 2020, just into town to mail a letter to England. 55 today, but the rest of the year's weather looks dismal.
When I got home I tried to put the head back on my A65 after replacing the valve springs. Of course there's one head bolt which must be put in the head before putting the head in place, not enough clearance next to the fat frame tube.
Started to torque the bolts in stages then noticed that one wouldn't tighten. Of course it's the one which won't come out with the head in place.
Off with the head and the threads in the barrels don't look good. Wouldn't you know, I don't have a 3/8" BSC tap.
Any BSA lovers out there who want a new project?


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72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"
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Happy xmas David..................btw the threads into the barrel are 3/8 bsf not cycle like the nuts.

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Got my $64 EMGO Tach in the mail and actually found the little spade and clip sitting in the parts box from the last owner. I was wondering if I had the wrong cable since there was no protruding inner cable (you forget a few details in 35+ years). Anyway it works great ! Red-line is 7,000 right? Of course I had a '70 Bonnie let go at around 3,500 so I doubt that I'll be pushing my luck. -BA

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Last edited by BAinLA; 12/29/20 10:39 pm. Reason: add pics

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Replaced the duff clutch hub in my 68 Spitfire with a new one, complete. Replaced the left footpeg stud and nut (LH thread). Also replaced the headlight (sealed beam).

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started taking front brake hoses lines and pads off of xs650 am replacing it with SS braided and EBC pads and 13mm magura massa cylinder like i did on the Commando


1972 Triumph T120
1968 BSA A65
1968 MGB Roadster
1979 Chevrolet Camaro Berlinetta
1969 Honda Mini Trail
1939 farmall f30 tractor
2004 Honda Shadow Aero

1975 yamaha xs650b
1972 Norton commando
2 olive drab WWII military bicycle replicas
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Oh, and since it is like, $600 or just a bit less to have the gauges overhauled, I bought the Chinese repop gauges. Since they are a bit too tall, they do not fit into the rubber cups far enough so that will let them stay connected to the bike, so I bought some 1/2 inch hex aluminum rod from McMaster Carr and turned up a couple T nuts that connect the 10-32 or whatever threaded studs on the back of the gauges to the bottom of the cups, and the aluminum gauge mount plate under them.

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Put my 1979 T140 D up on the stand, mainly for a clutch-ectomy.

This bike has retimed cams and a set of 10-1 MAP pistons and some JRC Keihin carbs and a Boyer, but is otherwise mechanically stock. I ride it somewhat energetically, and the clutch has started to slip in spite of my normal ministrations. (The old hub was grooved, I originally filed the slots and replaced all the plates and springs to stop its slipping, but the old rubbers and some more wear seem to have let it start slipping again.) So, I replaced the clutch hub with a new repop replacement (the rubbers were a bit loose) and installed a 7 plate clutch. The replacement hub and basket, as usual, seem to be made of a not very tough sort of cast iron. I have always thought of cryo for these things as a sort of aid to their longevity, but I didn't do that here and we shall see. As an aside, before I put a Newby clutch and belt on my race bike, I ran a LOT of stock clutch parts through it. I know other people get along fine with stock clutch parts on a race bike, but I never did, thinking a 40 hp clutch and primary drive on a 65 hp race bike was a sort of exercise in futility--and if I remember correctly, it weighed a whopping 17 lbs with front sprocket, chain, and complete clutch to boot. Anyway, I am hoping I have now solved the clutch problems of my mild street engine once and for all. It is all buttoned back up, so I guess we will see next summer when the snow melts.

I am also gearing it up a bit. The stock 20-47 seems too short on top and the gear splits are too close together. So I am going to try 20-45 first, and I may go to 21-45, if that is not enough--that would be basically the same as 20-43, which was always a noticeably tall gear on my race bike, but I have never tried it on the street. The unfortunate part is, my spanking new 45 tooth sprocket was (moan) powder coated black, and the thick powder coating prevented the center register hold from fitting over the hub, and prevented the mounting bolts from going through the holes. And, the durned powder coating was also on the teeth of the sprocket, fer cryin' out loud, and that would make a mess and make me chase chain adjustment frequently as it wore off. So, a turn on the drill press for the bolt holes, and with a bearing scraper for the center register hole, and a wire brush mounted in a die grinder, and an unnecessary hour and a half of my time later, I have an ugly black sprocket that actually mounts to the motorcycle. Kinda wished they had just made it in bare steel, like the stocker. Not quite done with it, had to stop for dinner last night, so it will be done today some time.

And, I replaced a headlight bulb.

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Staying with the T140, I thought I would also see how good I could make the stock fork. I’m no fan of putting modern forks on old bikes—at least street bikes. I had 38 mm forks I made cartridge forks for, on my 750 Sportsman Champion Triumph and my F500 Yamaha 2 stroke, but I like to keep stock looking major components on my vintage street bikes.

It seems to me the T140 forks generally work pretty well for the street, but have one glaring fault—they seem to suffer from a LOT from excess stiction —although fine on larger bumps using low speed damping, sharp edged bumps make the fork kick badly, and moving each fork by hand with the wheel and springs out takes an effort. I looked into putting a set of Race Tech Emulators into the forks but unlike the forks I had prevIously done this to, the Triumph fork would require more major surgery, cutting the top of the damping rod off in a lathe, and using springs only Race Tech sells. I thought I would try a milder approach first, so I got a piston ring replacement for the 97-4003 o-ring from L. P. Williams in England (97-4003P). I thought about turning some up my own on the lathe but I found these on the internet so I ordered them up. This is more or less the same thing that Progressive Suspension made years ago, and is most frequently cited as a key to improving fork action by getting rid of the o ring.

So, I popped the wheel out and stripped the forks, and pulled out the o rings and installed the piston rings. I had recently replaced the wipers and seals so I left them and only replaced the stato seals. I just put it all back together. I’m guessing this is not going to be enough improvement because the sliders are still not free in feel—they are hard to move without springs or oil in them and the wheel out, and it feels worse with oil in. I am thinking now the problem is not just stiction but also damping that is way off, especially high speed damping (on short, sharp jolts that make the wheel move fast). Good high speed damping usually requires valving that will blow open to allow a quick, short wheel movement. Anyway I’ll figure that out when the snow melts in May.

I put it together in a way I thought might help it work its best. I installed the wheel and the axle caps loosely and the studs in the axle grooves with the forks compressed to help center everything and avoid pinching the fork leg together, loosened the triple clamp bolts and tapped them with a dead blow hammer, tapped the axle over against the cap on the side with the nut, tightened it, then tightened the cap on the other side, and tightened the triples. Not sure if all this helped but these forks are sort of unusual because of axle clamps on both side and the grooves so I thought it was worth the effort.

When I put it back together I replaced the 20 weight fork oil I used last time with the widely available 10 wt Honda Proline fork oil. This is about the same as the Harley 15 wt oil available all over the place. I set the oil level at 140 mm fully collapsed with springs out, to give it some air spring effect to resist bottoming. That turned out to be around 220cc on each side.

Last edited by linker48x; 01/31/21 7:35 pm.
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A question about decals and pinstriping on Ajays made me drag out my spare chrome tank and have a look.
And soon degenerated into a remove-the-residual-rust before it gets chronic session (I bought it like that).
Cleaned up surprisingly well. Yes it is a bit beaten up, and shaky hand pinstriped.
Will look good on an 'original' bike ?

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The motorcycle on Captcha stuff didn't look too British .

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Today I tried my new camera mount. I wanted the camera (Mobius) fixed on the bike centerline, so not on the handlebar.

[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

The mount is made from an old plastic cutting board, a length of broom stick, a reusable zip tie, scratch protection stuff, a washer and some screws. And a few parts that came with the camera itself.

[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

It's light and reasonably rigid, even for bumpy rides.

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Well, it was yesterday, not today, but I FINALLY got around to setting the BSA straight ('68 Firebird dressed as a Lightning).

Swapped the cracked glass tach for the good used replacement.
Swapped the bent "tall" bars for a set of standard bars, with newer Grantourismo grips.
Straightened out the bent right muffler bracket.
Straightened out the bent right footpeg.
Swapped the dead battery for a fresh one.
Found the bloody key.
Zip-tied a few stray cables to keep them off the pipes, etc.
Knocked the chalk off the alloy engine covers and tail light housing.
Knocked the surface rust off the headlight shell, exhaust & fenders.

Then came the moment of truth, I tried to kickstart with my LEFT leg. NO GO! I still had to land on my right leg which is NOT up to it. One try ASSURED me that it was not a good idea.

At least it's back to LOOKING nice, and it SHOULD start right up when my buddy comes out the the ranch to help me next week.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Last edited by GrandPaul; 02/28/21 3:53 pm.

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Managed to get all the bikes started and ride them up n down the road ready for the spring as good weather is on the way here in the UK and after all the winter servicing work make sure all was good.
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I am still waiting for fork parts for my 1979 T140D, so I went ahead and mounted the Euro-jetted AMAL Mk 2 carburetors on it. When I bought this project, the carbs were defective--one body was cracked, and there was galling in the slide bore of the other one, so I had to scout up carb bodies and various parts, which took some time. While that process went on, I had previously mounted a pair of the JRC Keihins on it, and they fit and worked perfectly, but I wanted to get back to period English carbs on an older English bike, and move away from the (admittedly perfectly performing) flat slide Keihins.

The Mark 2s are the stock 30mm size carbs, with new chromed brass 3.5 slides, 15 pilots, 35 choke jets, 106 needle jets. 2A1 needles, and 220 mains, and no air jets. I mounted the carbs into the same angled TSX rubber manifolds I had the Keihins mounted in, which are required to have the room necessary to mount accessory filters, and I put a pair of Uni foam sock filters on it I had. I will eventually get a set of cone shaped black K&Ns to fit, which are prettier, but these will work fine and get me on the road--when the snow melts, around the middle or end of April. To mount these carburetors I had to replace the fuel line spigots on the bottom of the petcocks, and because of the TSX manifolds it was a very close fit between the spigots and the carb bodies.

One thing I will mention is, the best and safest accessory fuel line I have found is the grey Motion Pro stuff, available in 1/4 and 5/16 diameters, which is soft and compliant, and never hardens or cracks, and lasts for years and years--basically the same stuff that comes on modern dirt bikes, and you can get it in any reasonable sized modern shop that handles dirt bikes. The grey color is not ideal, it certainly doesn't look stock, but I used that for its safety and longevity.

And while I am waiting for fork parts, I also replaced the long 56 inch clutch cable suitable for T140D high bars, with a 51 inch cable that fits lower bars better.

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Well with all the shiny bikes above, I spent part of a day removing rust from a bit of project.
A lot of rust removed, in fact. And a bit more to go.
Only 1499 & 1/2 parts to go .?

[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]

Bonus brownie points for anyone who can spot what this is from.
I've not seen anyone with this year/model ?

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Okay, Rohan, it's been 10 days and no one has made a guess, so here goes.

Guess #1: I have no idea what it is off of, but I will guess it is a brake cam and cable arm connection.

Okay, guess #2: a clutch arm.

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Originally Posted by linker48x
Okay, Rohan, it's been 10 days and no one has made a guess, so here goes.

Guess #1: I have no idea what it is off of, but I will guess it is a brake cam and cable arm connection.

Okay, guess #2: a clutch arm.

Clearly a brake cam/actuating lever - but the question was, what is it from? To that I have no clue.


Mark Z

'65(lower)/'66(upper, wheels, front end, controls)/'67(seat, exhaust, fuel tank, headlamp)/'70(frame) A65 Bitsa.
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Finally getting around to dealing with the head gasket (oil) leak I had at the end of the last riding season. Photo shows the head soaking in kerosene (to soften the carbon) after resurfacing, and the new head gasket soaking in vinegar to remove the scale after annealing.

I don't remember who offered the tip on soaking the head gasket in vinegar, but, it works!
[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]


Mark Z

'65(lower)/'66(upper, wheels, front end, controls)/'67(seat, exhaust, fuel tank, headlamp)/'70(frame) A65 Bitsa.
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I installed the last of four Recoil thread inserts into my A65 cylinders. With careful attention to keeping everything centered and straight, one can hope that the head bolts go in without issue.
I also finished converting my Trident to rear-set pegs. I was going to leave it stock, but I wish to avoid any confusion with the reversed shift pattern on my Bonneville.

Gearside.jpg (32.76 KB, 59 downloads)
Brakeside.jpg (42.88 KB, 59 downloads)
Last edited by DavidP; 03/14/21 5:23 am. Reason: Add pix

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72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"
92 BMW K100rs "Gustav"
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Ah yes, a front brake lever and cam.
I don't think I expected anyone to come up with that, its prewar Enfield, a bit obscure.
The one with the pressed tin brake drum...

Now I have an obscure problem. The brake shoes seem to have been relined, nice thick material.
But the brass rivets come up to the surface of the material, I'm not sure thats good ?
Or does the brass contribute to the braking action !

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Originally Posted by Rohan
Ah yes, a front brake lever and cam.
I don't think I expected anyone to come up with that, its prewar Enfield, a bit obscure.
The one with the pressed tin brake drum...

Now I have an obscure problem. The brake shoes seem to have been relined, nice thick material.
But the brass rivets come up to the surface of the material, I'm not sure thats good ?
Or does the brass contribute to the braking action !

[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]

Don’t use the shoes with rivet heads at the surface. They will make grooves in the drum. They need to be lined again.


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Big day yesterday, pretty busy out at the shop, I installed the fork rubber gaiters on the '67 Triumph, reinstalled the front wheel, and cleaned up the front fender...

[Linked Image]

Next was the new battery...

[Linked Image]

New kickstart arm & lever with fixing key (still need the rubber)

[Linked Image]

Swapped shifters with my race bike that doesn't need to look pretty, also installed a new points cover-

[Linked Image]

Don't worry, the alloy engine covers will look great once I clean them up...

Re-installed the clutch after I adapted my clutch screw tool by simply slipping an alloy sleeve over it to keep it centered on the screws I'm adjusting (no photo)


And totally overhauled the carbs (will install them tomorrow-

[Linked Image]

54-year old bike is still hanging in there and running as good as (better than?) it looks!


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Too many bikes to list, mostly Triumph & Norton, a BSA, & some Japanese
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Originally Posted by linker48x
I am still waiting for fork parts for my 1979 T140D, so I went ahead and mounted the Euro-jetted Amal Mk 2 carburetors on it.
I love the Mk2s! I had them on my first Bonneville, a '71. It's what I was looking for when I found the Mikunis I put on the A65. After too many plug chops I went back to Mk1s on that bike. When I got my '72 Bonnie I found a set of Mk2s for it and never looked back. Even at 32mm they work perfectly. Mostly European jetting but with larger pilot jets. I found that the Uni filters work well, but dry, no oil.


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72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
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I finished putting the top end back on my A65. Say what you will about Triumph push rod tubes but it beats peering down a dark tunnel to get the push rods on the correct tappets.
Got the exhaust rocker shaft in and valves adjusted at clearances guaranteed to cause valve clatter. Only thing left is the rocker cover and that bitch of a head steady.


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72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"
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