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10drum Offline OP
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The lug is missing on this 62 A10 project. The whole replacement side stand with lug, cost $200. No one seems to have the lug.

I have seen some affordable bolt on sidestands, does anyone have any recommendations?

I also posted a question about the horn placement.

Thanks for all replies.

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Hi
The general consensus is that the cheap side stand's are best avoided . If your bike falls over and damages the tank then how much does it cost to repair or replace
The bolt on clamps are not that great , its best to braze the rear part to the frame once you have the angle set
The frame tubes are quite thin walled so arc welding can cause problems

John

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Originally Posted by chaterlea25
Hi
The general consensus is that the cheap side stand's are best avoided . If your bike falls over and damages the tank then how much does it cost to repair or replace
The bolt on clamps are not that great , its best to braze the rear part to the frame once you have the angle set
The frame tubes are quite thin walled so arc welding can cause problems

John

the tubes of the frame arnt that thin but yeah unless you are good with an arc welder probaly not the best

what i have done in situations like that (needed to get some new exhaust lugs welded onto a65 frame) is i took the bike to the exhaust pipe shop ...those guys have hoists and are really good with MIG welders ...car exhaust tube is way thinner than bike frame tube ........you dont need to fully weld it all the way around so get them to put a couple of say 1/2 inch welds some where you can grind them off easily ............DISCONNECT battery generator/alternator zenner diode depending on what the electrics are before hitting it with an electric welder

20 minutes and a dozen beer job done


"There's the way it ought to be and there's the way it is" (Sgt Barnes)
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After trying and being disappointed with cheap options (bike had a weird stance..looked like it was about to lean over)
I modified a Triumph T160 side stand for my A10.

+1 on comments by Ignoramus


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build a lug and either weld or braze it on. braze has a lot of advantages if the part is designed right. look at the braze-ons the bike is built with, you can duplicate that idea with 2 L brackets tacked together to make a T. form the 2 flanges around the tube.

as for disconnecting the battery when welding, I am of the opposite camp. the battery acts like a big capacitor... thats one of the things it does in the system. it soaks up spikes and transients. if you are worried, disconnect the fancy systems... CDI, ABS and such, but be aware that these systems often have grounds that do not disconnect with the main connector... that leaves a potential path, especially with the battery out

I have arc welded on cars and motorcycles many times (stick and MIG). the key is to get the ground lead close to the work area

the guys in Long Way 'Round melted wires, nothing to do with the arc other than the heat

Last edited by Mitch; 12/18/20 8:35 am.
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I recently installed a new side stand on a 61 A10...This was done with engine removed, Made reference marks and unbrazed the managled stock bracket half. Bought a Triumph weld on replacement lug for $50. This requires tack welding, heating the lug legs with an oxy torch to curve them around the frame tube. Then finish welding or brazing if you prefer. Finished it with a Triumph used stand shaped and trimmed to fit...
This bike is no modified so whatever stand is used mighr requie some fitting on a stock bike

20201218_075211.jpg

79 T140D, 96 900M Ducati ,61 A10 .On a bike you can out run the demons.."I don't know what the world may need
But a V8 engine is a good start for me
Think I'll drive to find a place, to be surly"
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Originally Posted by Mitch
build a lug and either weld or braze it on. braze has a lot of advantages if the part is designed right. look at the braze-ons the bike is built with, you can duplicate that idea with 2 L brackets tacked together to make a T. form the 2 flanges around the tube.

as for disconnecting the battery when welding, I am of the opposite camp. the battery acts like a big capacitor... thats one of the things it does in the system. it soaks up spikes and transients. if you are worried, disconnect the fancy systems... CDI, ABS and such, but be aware that these systems often have grounds that do not disconnect with the main connector... that leaves a potential path, especially with the battery out

I have arc welded on cars and motorcycles many times (stick and MIG). the key is to get the ground lead close to the work area

the guys in Long Way 'Round melted wires, nothing to do with the arc other than the heat

i dont really know im a mechanical engineer and only learned enough eclectic type stuff to get my degree ,,,i am delighted to say i have forgotten all that electric stuff ...

all im going by is what people tell me ...like the guys in the exhaust shop i was talking about ,,,,i dont know for sure so i just take the attitude "if it could be damaged by some huge power spike i disconnect it " i err on the side of caution in matters i dont understand ....put simply i have no idea (well a little perhaps ) mean i did solder 2 wires together eventually and fixed my generator brush it was really a mechanical problem ....ibut had to get my friend to set up the voltage regulator though ...but i can spin up a new main bush and select the correct materials tolerances ect in 1 hour ...we all have our strengths and weakness ,,,,ive wired a few houses but the more complicated stuff just isnt me dude....remember you are talking to a man who fried the computer on his car by not disconnecting the battery to charge it THAT pissed me off big time and cost a lot for my lesson!


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10drum Offline OP
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Thanks for the replies. probably end up paying the $200.

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Originally Posted by Hillbilly bike
I recently installed a new side stand on a 61 A10... Bought a Triumph weld on replacement lug for $50.
This is the route I'm taking on my A10 side stand. The original bolted type tends to loosen and rattle... or fall off.


Moderated by  Allan G, Jon W. Whitley 

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