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Hi DavidP, Having that transformer is really nice!!

I have a MAC tools digital amp meter. Goes to 40a. Is quite accurate even in milliamps. So fun to test the zener. Very educational. Turning lights on/off, watching the volts, then amps through zener change at different rpm & loads.

Triumph was pretty good at matching the weakest, lightest, simplest, charging system they could and still have it just barely work. Finally they had to step it up & become 3 phase.

I have some spare 1/3 & 1/2 hp electric motors laying around. I also have spare rotor & stator. My plan is to make a rotor/stator test rig. What I don't know is how much power it will take with belt drag etc. I want to use some stepped V-belt pulleys to change speeds. The Manual target speed is 3000. That is under load of output, so I'll have to see what happens. Looking at online calculators I should more than enough power, but... It takes a lot of power to overcome belt friction & it takes a lot of power to generate electricity.

This way I could take a known good rotor & get a base line with 1ohm 100w resistor. Then if owner might suspect weak magnet, I could put on tester & see what output is. Maybe a pipe dream, but it should work.
Don


1973 Tiger 750
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I mentioned how varying the tightness of the aau fixing bolt made a difference. I have been thinking that when I strobe the timing with the disc mounted on the exhaust cam, and then refit the bolt, it must be important that the bolt is done up to the same tightness as I used to do do up the disc mount. It would be better to be able to shine the strobe on the alternator rotor but my 67 doesn't allow for this, unfortunately.

I am thinking that with electronic ignition the rotor (ignition) wouldn't be affected like this. I note that they don't have a notch for the peg on the exhaust cam taper. Is the taper enough to hold it in place when you remove the timing disc and redo the the fixing bolt?

Dave

dave jones #827536 10/23/20 12:45 pm
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RV, this could be a head start on that project

https://www.ebay.com/itm/MINI-TUNE-ALTERNATOR-STARTER-Tester-TE3004-115v-Test-Stand/293776501787?hash=item446671ac1b:g:570AAOSw8GFfgk9G

For reference, this one uses a 1/2hp. And that's prob taking into account big truck alternators etc...

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Alternator-Starter-Tester-8600-1-2-HP-series-Associated-Equipment-Corporation/174349211761?hash=item289805d871:g:4IQAAOSwPxdfDg2e


'68 Bonnie, '70 TR6r
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Hi Dave, I've not experienced the change in AAU wobble when removing installing AAU center bolt. I lock them down well to set unit in taper before I remove bolt though. Yet not overtightening.

I verify bore of cam taper is smooth, burr free including peg. I verify the AAU taper is smooth, burr free. The AAU is often burred by poor alignment with peg during install. Easy to do.

I always feel peg as I install AAU so I know it's fully engaged. Then tightly hold AAU into taper keeping it straight as possible so taper isn't skewed even slightly or it might stay skewed. Then still holding I install bolt & tighten it. Only then do I let go of AAU with other hand.

Regarding Electronic ignition rotors. They have no taper. When installing you set motor to 38b with rotor mark or TDC tool. Then loosely install rotor. It must not touch pin at all!! If it should touch you need to file end of taper on rotor such it no longer touches pin.

With TriSpark you set pick up plate in place slots centered. There is a witness mark on pickup. Transfer mark to points cavity. Remove plate. Install rotor mark with the mark you just made & lock rotor in place. Reinstall pickup plate, start motor & strobe time.

With Boyer you loosely install rotor. Install pick up plate slots centered. Pickup plate has hole drilled in it. The rotor has a white dot on it. Set motor to 38b. Spin rotor until dot shows exactly centered in the "window drilling". Lock rotor in place. Start motor, strobe time.

These are the only ones I have personal experience with, but others are similar.

Notice there is no provision for static timing as you'd have with points. The basic alignment of rotor is only close enough to get motor started for strobe timing.

Later timing covers are like a special tool for early bike owners. There are work arounds, but if you have the "tool" it makes life much simpler. A beat up junker will run you $40-50 eBay. Even junkers are in demand for this reason. Good ones with no damage will be $130-200. Make sure they have pointer & no damage in pointer area. Most damage is from foot peg hitting cover. Even still cracked on is fine for special tool use. Do not get repro, they are junk sand cast & don't fit right.

In the end of the day, I'd buy a later primary cover & use it all the time, or just get the cheapest junker from eBay or wherever & just use it to set timing. If you have allen head bolts at bottom of primary cover, with cut off allen wrench you can often remove cover without removing the exhaust pipe. With the right combination of tools & some practice removing foot peg is very easy. Hold up brake lever with bungee cord. Then back off the brake rod adjuster.

Thing is with EI once you set timing with strobe it really doesn't change at all. You'll forget about timing checks until you have to remove pick up plate for some other repair. Be sure you have the correct 70-4707 seal on wire to prevent moisture getting into points cavity. Very important even with EI.
Don


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Thanks for the info, Don. The main thing I was asking was whether an ei rotor would stay in the same place during the process of initial fitting, bolt removal, timing disc mandrel installation and removal and then final bolt fitting.

Dave

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Originally Posted by dave jones
The main thing I was asking was whether an ei rotor would stay in the same place during the process of initial fitting, bolt removal, timing disc mandrel installation and removal and then final bolt fitting.

Once the rotor bolt has been tightened then the rotor normally has to be extracted (or shocked) to loosen it, so should remain firmly in place.

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Hi Dave, As LAB said, yes it should.
If it does not either your not tighten bolt tight enough or something is wrong with the tapers.

I’ve set static timing locking AAU at full advance on many bikes. The AAU stays put perfectly during this process.

If all is well with AAU & you are careful locking to full advance, setting tdc tool & degree wheel. Use a test light (with battery as needed) I have found static timing to be within 1.5 degrees of strobe. Always take your readings by backing up crank 1:8 turn or so, then going forwards to get your reading when points open.

Locating 38b (or tdc) with tdc tool & installing degree wheel on cam, be sure to do same with crank. Gear backlash must always be on mind.

You can strobe off degree wheel on cam also. Tighten degree wheel well so it doesn’t slip. Your pointer needs to be stiff or it wiggles from vibration.

I have personally done this, then compared to rotor marks in primary cover. They read the same.

The key is accurately setting degree wheel.

I’ll tell you right now, I am no fan of knocking AAU off. The spindle of AAU is skinny. It can be bent be hitting it.
Why not use the real puller tool? Safe, fast, easy. No chance of damage.
Don


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I do not lock the AAU in place. I use a continuity light and with a screwdriver in the slot of the cam, I flick it forward until the light goes out just as it reaches maximum advance. I find I am pretty accurate doing it that way. I used to check it with a strobe, but it was always right where it is supposed to be, so I don't bother strobing any more.

Ed from NJ

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Thanks, Ed. It certainly is a pain setting up my 67 for strobing.

Dave

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