Classic British SparesKlempf British PartsBaxter CycleBritBike Sponsor SteadfastCyclesSRM EngineeringLucas Classic MotorcycleHepolite PistonsIndustrial tec supply

Upgrade your membership to: Premium Membership | Gold Membership | Life Membership | Vendor Membership | Site Sponsor Membership
Welcome to BritBike Forum!
Britbike forum logo
Member Spotlight
Cariboo_kid
Cariboo_kid
British Columbia
Posts: 344
Joined: February 2003
ShoutChat
Comment Guidelines: Do post respectful and insightful comments. Don't flame, hate, spam.
Search eBay for motorcycle parts in following countries
Australia, Canada, France, Holland, Italy, United Kingdom, USA
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 3 of 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
B
BAinLA Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
B
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
Yes, thanks for that. Down the line I will do as you suggest. -BA


1972 Triumph TR6RV Tiger back from the dead
Support Your #1 BritBike Forum!

Check out British motorcycles for sale: British Motorcycles on e-Bay UK, British motorcycles on e-Bay North America
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
B
BAinLA Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
B
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
Today I changed the sump and tank oil and the primary oil. Wow, what a hassle draining the primary. Anyway, I noticed that there actually is a spark at each plug (not a good one) so I splashed a little 2-stoke mix in each hole (that's all I had on hand) and the old fossil fired a few times on one side only. So now I need to take that AMAL 930 off and get it cleaned up and operational. It's frozen shut but I'm sure I can fix it up easy enough. Stay tuned. I'll make a video of the first start-up. -BA

Last edited by BAinLA; 08/14/20 11:45 pm.

1972 Triumph TR6RV Tiger back from the dead
Joined: Oct 2003
Posts: 11,259
Likes: 21
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2003
Posts: 11,259
Likes: 21
Slow and steady.

ALWAYS apply some form of lubrication (Never-Sieze, 20W50, chassis grease, what ever!) to spark plug threads before installing a spark plug. Even if you just took that plug out of that hole.


Don't hide 'em, Ride 'em !!

RF Whatley
NE Georgia, USA
1 member likes this: Jon W. Whitley
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
B
BAinLA Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
B
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
Originally Posted by RF Whatley
Slow and steady.

ALWAYS apply some form of lubrication (Never-Sieze, 20W50, chassis grease, what ever!) to spark plug threads before installing a spark plug. Even if you just took that plug out of that hole.

That's good to know, thanks. I've been giving them an occasional shot of WD-40. Now I will always do so.

Today I finally got my carb gasket set and put the 930 AMAL back together and on the engine. However the float valve is leaking badly so off it comes. I think the valve seat down in the bowl is crudded up but I was leary of messing around down there and ruining the surface. What can I do to restore this seat or do I need to get a new bowl? The old valve needle itself looked fine so I reused it since the carb kit did not include one. Thanks, -BA

Edit; I just watched a YouTube vid by Lunmad and I notice that he uses a different method for checking float height. Using his method my float was about .140 inch too high. I believe I will buy a new needle and adjust the seat if possible (not sure mine has the brass insert like his '73 Bonnie does). I still need to know how to clean or true the seat. -BA

Last edited by BAinLA; 08/23/20 5:50 pm.

1972 Triumph TR6RV Tiger back from the dead
Joined: May 2013
Posts: 7,685
Likes: 103
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: May 2013
Posts: 7,685
Likes: 103
Originally Posted by RF Whatley
Slow and steady.

ALWAYS apply some form of lubrication (Never-Sieze, 20W50, chassis grease, what ever!) to spark plug threads before installing a spark plug. Even if you just took that plug out of that hole.

The last garage I worked at also raced Rally cars, they asked me to change a set of plugs on a hot engine, but didn’t likely me using lubrication on the new plugs, so I pointed out that I didn’t want blaming for stripped threads so would do it my way.


Now let’s all have a beer beerchug

68’ A65 Lightning “clubman”
71’ A65 823 Thunderbolt (undergoing restoration)
67’ D10 sportsman (undergoing restoration)
68’ D14 trials (undergoing transformation)

Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 5,745
Likes: 114
DOPE
Offline
DOPE
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 5,745
Likes: 114
sometimes people put that stuff on with a trowel and it gumz up the firing end. ive uzed a copper based antizieze for yearz, sparingly, with no problems.

sometimes they tighten the wazoolies out of em too, and that doesnt help


i'm old enough to remember when patriotism meant not trying to overthrow the government.
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,022
Likes: 50
I
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
I
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,022
Likes: 50
RE: WD-40:

Isn't that a "water dispersant", NOT a lubricant?

It appears to evaporate too quickly to be an "oil."

Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
B
BAinLA Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
B
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
Originally Posted by Irish Swede
RE: WD-40:

Isn't that a "water dispersant", NOT a lubricant?

It appears to evaporate too quickly to be an "oil."

Not sure about it's volatility but it has been tested somewhat favorably as a penetrating oil and does seem to have it's uses as a lubricant, probably not too effective in this application I admit but remember, my engine is not running so heat is not a factor. The anti-cease copper formulas would seem to be more appropriate. -BA

Also, since this is an international forum, WD-40 is completely different between the UK, the U.S. and Australia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD-40

Here is an excellent test of it's (U.S.formula) penetrating ability; ( it beat PB Blaster and Kroil) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xUEob2oAKVs

Last edited by BAinLA; 08/24/20 2:27 pm.

1972 Triumph TR6RV Tiger back from the dead
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
B
BAinLA Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
B
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
Here is my $200 treasure (now ~$300 with parts and oils) in the light of day after a quick cleaning.

[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

Here is what I'm dealing with currently;

[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

Even after thorough cleaning, adjusting and testing it still leaks worse than a sieve after installation due to overflowing bowl. -BA -ordered some petcocks so that I don't burn the place down during testing.

Last edited by BAinLA; 08/24/20 6:37 pm.

1972 Triumph TR6RV Tiger back from the dead
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 710
Likes: 108
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 710
Likes: 108


1970 T120R - 'Anton'
1970 Commando - 'Bruno'
1967 T120R - 'Caesar'
1968 Lightning - 'Dora'
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,022
Likes: 50
I
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
I
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,022
Likes: 50
It appears to be complete, or nearly so.

It's going to work up into a pretty nice bike.

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,004
Likes: 60
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,004
Likes: 60
Originally Posted by BAinLA
Today I finally got my carb gasket set and put the 930 AMAL back together and on the engine. However the float valve is leaking badly so off it comes. I think the valve seat down in the bowl is crudded up but I was leary of messing around down there and ruining the surface. What can I do to restore this seat or do I need to get a new bowl? The old valve needle itself looked fine so I reused it since the carb kit did not include one. Thanks, -BA

BA,

Where exactly is it leaking from ? Also, as suggested, a Stay-up float should be on your list of things to buy. I would also buy a new brass Viton tipped float needle.

I don't know how you cleaned the carburetor but if you haven't done so, it and all of its metal components need to be submerged for a few days in Gunk Carburetor Parts Cleaner

https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p...xYdt4CO5vxoCFrEQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

[Linked Image from shop.advanceautoparts.com]

Or Berryman Chem-Dip

https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p...ER1HxAYNmxoCsYwQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

[Linked Image from shop.advanceautoparts.com]

Then thoroughly cleaned with small brushes, pipe cleaners, carb cleaner from a spray can and compressed air. Or, treat yourself and the bike to a brand new AMAL Premier 930 Concentric Carburetor.


Jon W.


1957 6T Thunderbird 650
1968 T100R Daytona 500
1971 TR6R Tiger 650
1970 BSA A65F 650
1955 Tiger 100 - Project
1971 BSA A65 650 - Project
1972 Norton Commando 750 "Combat"


"Every time I listen to AC/DC, so do my neighbors"

Joined: May 2019
Posts: 748
Likes: 219
C
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
C
Joined: May 2019
Posts: 748
Likes: 219
MEK works really well for removing the varnish in carburetors. Being in California, you would probably have to order it from out of state (assuming it’s legal to do so) and MEK has probably been removed from any carburetor cleaners available locally.

Joined: May 2013
Posts: 7,685
Likes: 103
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: May 2013
Posts: 7,685
Likes: 103
By the time you’ve bought all the components to get that carb half decent you might as well have bought a new prem. it will come with the stay up float, aluminium float needle (which replaced the brass type) and anodised slide, plus new jets which will be to the correct size and not worn out.

That float bowl you have there has also been shaved at some point in its life also, it’s possible that the mounting face on the carb is also bent meaning a poor seal and a pita to pull up the pilot mixture.

Not sure how much they are in the US, but with the current GBP-USD rate it might be cheaper to buy direct from the UK.


Now let’s all have a beer beerchug

68’ A65 Lightning “clubman”
71’ A65 823 Thunderbolt (undergoing restoration)
67’ D10 sportsman (undergoing restoration)
68’ D14 trials (undergoing transformation)

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,004
Likes: 60
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,004
Likes: 60
Originally Posted by Allan G
By the time you’ve bought all the components to get that carb half decent you might as well have bought a new premier. it will come with the stay up float, aluminum float needle (which replaced the brass type) and anodized slide, plus new jets which will be to the correct size and not worn out.

Not sure how much they are in the US, but with the current GBP-USD rate it might be cheaper to buy direct from the UK.


Seconded !

Vintage Triumph Supply eBay

https://vintagetriumphsupply.com/in...-hand-single-carb-tr6r-tr6c-triumph.html

https://vintagetriumphsupply.com/in...nd-cable-right-hand-tr6-for-triumph.html


Jon W.


1957 6T Thunderbird 650
1968 T100R Daytona 500
1971 TR6R Tiger 650
1970 BSA A65F 650
1955 Tiger 100 - Project
1971 BSA A65 650 - Project
1972 Norton Commando 750 "Combat"


"Every time I listen to AC/DC, so do my neighbors"

Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
B
BAinLA Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
B
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
Got it squared away and it started 2nd kick! I was really shocked and the throttle was stuck a little too high because I need to lube the cable a bit more than I have already.



[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]


1972 Triumph TR6RV Tiger back from the dead
1 member likes this: Noe
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,004
Likes: 60
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,004
Likes: 60
BA,

Congratulations, getting it to run !!

It looks like your kicker return spring needs some attention. Also, make sure your kill switch is working.


Jon W.


1957 6T Thunderbird 650
1968 T100R Daytona 500
1971 TR6R Tiger 650
1970 BSA A65F 650
1955 Tiger 100 - Project
1971 BSA A65 650 - Project
1972 Norton Commando 750 "Combat"


"Every time I listen to AC/DC, so do my neighbors"

Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
B
BAinLA Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
B
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
Thanks! It needs a few things and this start-up was not planned! I need to pressure-lube the cables, add an in-line oil filter to the return line (recommendations welcome) and un-stick the clutch. Also it only idles with the choke 1/2 closed, so I need to check the idle circuit for blockage. Float level is spot on.

For unsticking the clutch I am thinking about push-starting it in 1st gear, getting it up to the RPM where max torque occurs which is North of 5000 I believe, and nailing the throttle with the clutch pulled all the way to the bar. Then on and off the throttle a few times. If that doesn't work, I will have to buy a puller tool and go in there and have a look-see. Still just thinking at this point., -BA

Last edited by BAinLA; 08/26/20 2:23 am.

1972 Triumph TR6RV Tiger back from the dead
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 5,510
Likes: 55
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 5,510
Likes: 55
You don't need a puller just to un-stick or remove the clutch discs; you just need to undo the clutch spring nuts and pull the discs and pressure plate out of the clutch basket. Once removed, I think you'll find they come apart pretty easily (if they're not already apart by then).

What you might need is a tool to remove the clutch spring nuts. This would be something like a very wide screwdriver with a notch in the center of the blade (to clear the stud that protrudes through the nut), and can be homemade, if you don't mind sacrificing a large screwdriver.

The clutch spring nuts have a "tit" on the underside of the head that's there to catch on the end of the spring and keep them from backing off. When removing them, you need to pry the spring back with a screwdriver so it doesn't try to shear the "tit" (or worse, ruin the spring, which I've done.)


Mark Z

'65(lower)/'66(upper, wheels, front end, controls)/'67(seat, exhaust, fuel tank, headlamp)/'70(frame) A65 Bitsa.
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
B
BAinLA Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
B
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
Originally Posted by Mark Z
You don't need a puller just to un-stick or remove the clutch discs; you just need to undo the clutch spring nuts and pull the discs and pressure plate out of the clutch basket. Once removed, I think you'll find they come apart pretty easily (if they're not already apart by then).

What you might need is a tool to remove the clutch spring nuts. This would be something like a very wide screwdriver with a notch in the center of the blade (to clear the stud that protrudes through the nut), and can be homemade, if you don't mind sacrificing a large screwdriver.

The clutch spring nuts have a "tit" on the underside of the head that's there to catch on the end of the spring and keep them from backing off. When removing them, you need to pry the spring back with a screwdriver so it doesn't try to shear the "tit" (or worse, ruin the spring, which I've done.)

Thanks Mark Z,

I answered this once but it isn't showing so here goes again;

This is music to my ears and thanks for the info about what to watch out for when doing the clutch operation. You probably saved me some grief. Thanks again! -BA


1972 Triumph TR6RV Tiger back from the dead
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
B
BAinLA Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
B
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
Yes, I soaked the carb in lacquer thinner for three days and then scraped and reamed my way through the considerable crap and blew all passages with compressed air. Apparently it needs to come off for more work on the idle circuit because it won't idle without some choke, maybe 1/2. Don't know about the $200 carb just yet. I still need to see if it has a transmission that works. Brakes sound rusty too, so it will slowly come around. Thanks for all the suggestions. -BA


1972 Triumph TR6RV Tiger back from the dead
Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 934
Likes: 12
E
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
E
Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 934
Likes: 12
In my experience, the only thing that really works on old really gummed up carbs is carburetor cleaner. Lacquer thinner, acetone, brake cleaner all work fine if the carb is just mildly dirty, but they don't seem to shift the the really gummed up fuel deposits you get from something that has been sitting for years with gas in it. The best thing you can do is give the carbs a bath in an ultrasonic cleaner, followed by going through it with spray can carb cleaner and, of course, the requisite .076" drill for the pilot jets. Having said that, I'll bet yours will run just fine if you spend $5 on a can of spray cab cleaner to go through them once more, and run the drill bit through the pilot jets.

Ed from NJ

Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
B
BAinLA Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
B
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 139
Likes: 4
Originally Posted by edunham
In my experience, the only thing that really works on old really gummed up carbs is carburetor cleaner. Lacquer thinner, acetone, brake cleaner all work fine if the carb is just mildly dirty, but they don't seem to shift the the really gummed up fuel deposits you get from something that has been sitting for years with gas in it. The best thing you can do is give the carbs a bath in an ultrasonic cleaner, followed by going through it with spray can carb cleaner and, of course, the requisite .076" drill for the pilot jets. Having said that, I'll bet yours will run just fine if you spend $5 on a can of spray cab cleaner to go through them once more, and run the drill bit through the pilot jets.

Ed from NJ
Good points. I got the lacquer thinner idea from am old book "Glenn's Triumph..." but he wasn't talking about totally cloggred up carbs. I'll get some carb cleaner and give it a shot. I think the pilot jet is the stuck-up one. In another thread ( http://www.britbike.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=323555 ) a guy says the pilot is .016, I think that is what you meant because .076 seems large for that purpose but I can't remember much from 40 years ago when I last worked on an AMAL. Also, if it makes a difference, this is a single carb (Tiger) bike. Thanks again, -BA


1972 Triumph TR6RV Tiger back from the dead
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 5,411
Likes: 131
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 5,411
Likes: 131
The pilot jet is 0.016” or 16 thou.
It is a #78 drill bit.
Same for AMAL Concentrics whether single or dual carb.
HTH

Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 5,745
Likes: 114
DOPE
Offline
DOPE
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 5,745
Likes: 114
Originally Posted by BAinLA
For unsticking the clutch I am thinking about push-starting it in 1st gear, getting it up to the RPM where max torque occurs which is North of 5000 I believe, and nailing the throttle with the clutch pulled all the way to the bar. Then on and off the throttle a few times. If that doesn't work, I will have to buy a puller tool and go in there and have a look-see. Still just thinking at this point., -BA

no no no don't do that.

they may be well and truly dry and stuck and won't come undone. if you're lucky you'll just shear the mainshaft key.

you don't need a puller. the basket can stay in place.

take off the pressure plate, winkle the steel and fibre plates out with two bits of bent wire. slather the fibre plates with white lithium grease very casually wiped off, put em back, install the pressure plate, adjust the springs and pressure plate lift and you're good.

in a stock 1972 you run the risk of grenading the gearbox putting a sudden load on it trying to free up the clutch.

don't do that. it's expensive.

you'll need a puller eventually, but not for this.


i'm old enough to remember when patriotism meant not trying to overthrow the government.
Page 3 of 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Moderated by  Jon W. Whitley 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Job CycleBritish Cycle SupplyMorries PlaceKlempf British PartsPodtronicVintage MagazineBSA Unit SinglesBritBike SponsorBritish Tools & FastenersBritBike SponsorBritBike Sponsor






© 1996-2021 britbike.com
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5