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#772007 04/26/19 8:35 am
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I'm hoping if I start a thread it will help get my arse in gear!

So for anyone wanting some background this is an old thread for my TR6 minus the pictures (photo bucket!)

http://www.britbike.com/forums/ubbthreads.php/topics/346742/the-evolution-of-a-tr6#Post346742

Anyway, summer before last I was being silly and popped the head gasket, this has been an on going problem caused by oil leaking between the valve guides and head. I pulled the head and whipped the barrel off to check the already dodgy little end bush. Sure enough it had spun and there is no way of saving the rod. Having split the cases I decided, as you do, to replace the big and main bearings and rods so the motor got shelfed while I did some saving. New rods were kindly donated by my employer and are sitting on the shelf.

Then life stepped in and some bad stuff happened.

When I got to thinking about the bike again I formulated a plan. My T120R was sitting there, I'm having issues registering it for the road. I figured I would just pull the Bonnie motor and slip it in the TR6 to get me mobile again. To the shed I went and stripped the TR6 enough that I could lay it on it's side over the Bonnie motor. Then I swapped bikes and sat down next to the Bonnie spanners in hand..................

Try as I might I couldn't do it!

So I swapped bikes again and decided if the TR6 was in bits it was going to get a good going over to make it the bike it should be. Hers the TR6 last time it had a good clean.

[Linked Image]

and the Bonnie that was very nearly a donor

[Linked Image]

So the TR6 was stripped to component parts, the frame sections were given a good prep and then a coat of paint. The other black cycle parts are slowly being paint stripped and painted in small batches and I have a bucket slowly filling with Fasteners and various motorcycle parts ready for plating.

[Linked Image]

Whilst I await the plate shop I've mocked up the bike on the bench to keep everything together and have been cleaning up the harness and sorting the terminals that required attention.

[Linked Image]

Thats it for now, I'll keep plodding on.

Rod

Last edited by R Moulding; 04/26/19 8:36 am.

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Sadly Rod, starting a thread to gee me up on a project doesn’t work for me, I have an A50 Daytona, Bantam trials and 823cc thunderbolt threads waiting in the wings. The latest project the 823 is the only one which gets some work but that’s because:

A) the misses may go on the back of it
B) I can load it up like a camel with luggage and not have to keep changing the aesthetics of the bike.

The trials bike will happen when it does and if/when I have spare cash and the racer will happen one day.... I hope.

Back to the TR6, sad to see the old girl come apart, she always looks like a beautiful machine. However good call on the conrod! It was something similar which ended up with me doing a full restoration of the Honda 400/4


Now let’s all have a beer beerchug

68’ A65 Lightning “clubman”
71’ A65 823 Thunderbolt (now rebuilt)
67’ D10 sportsman (undergoing restoration)
68’ D14 trials (undergoing transformation)

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Well winter suddenly turned up after a lovely long summer and I've been avoiding the shed! I've also had to give myself a reality check, with my kittle Girl due to arrive in September the chances are that if I don't make my plans a little more realistic this bike will never go back together. So new plan, frame and cycle parts will be re painted along with side cover and oil tank. Lots of little issues will get fixed but the wheels will have to wait along with the tank and guards.

First of my little annoying problems is the rear brake plate. The threaded stud for the torque stay has been stripped all the years I've had the bike and had two thick washers fitted so the nut had some thread to bite too. Thought about this for ages, I wanted to maintain the original 7/16x 26 thread and also retain the domed shape of the original stud. The original fitting has a flat head on the inside with a relief cut for the brake shoes and is brazed in, I also wanted to retain this so it looks original on the flip side of the plate, bit sad really.

Anyway since I don't have access to anything that would allow me to make a replacement or possess the skills to do so, I hatched a plan. I purchased a new rotor stud for the crank, it has the correct thread and the domed top, I removed the old stud in the press and then cut off the flat head. This was then drilled and taped and the new stud screwed into it. I then mounted it in the brake plate and set the finished length. Trimmed the excess and brazed it into place.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Came out presentable enough. Brake plate is the next pile to stripped and painted.

Then I decided to give the rear guard a scrub and polish to see if it can be made presentable after 12 years of abuse. I started by scrubbing the underside with a little thinner on some rag. Cant help but love stone chip!

[Linked Image]

Then flipped it over

[Linked Image]

A quick wash and gentle sand with 2000 grit followed by cutting compound and machine glaze.

[Linked Image]

It will have to do. So I popped it on the bike and rested the tank on to make me feel better.

[Linked Image]

Rod

Last edited by R Moulding; 07/11/19 9:53 am.

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1966 was a year of beautiful paint schemes for Triumph. Pacific Blue and Alaskan White were the colors as names used for the TR6 in the USA. If either a '66 TR6 or T-Bird came my way, I'd grab onto it.

I am putting together a '70 TR6R. It will be as original. I am not fond of the "Spring Gold" color, but it is what it is,
(it looks like "metallic pea soup green" to me.)

It will be built for cruising enjoyment...maybe just 8:1 compression to run on today's lousy gas.

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Very nice indeed.


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Nice work RM Good to see you are still creating. Really nice work.



'55 "The Mighty 6T", '01 DR650, '13 KTM300XC

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Beljum, good to see you posting. I quite often wander how that old 6T is getting along?

Rod


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Well, it's been an interesting 8 months. Baby Girl turned up and we realised our 90 square meter house was simply far too small, so everything went on the back burner while I did some overdue work in order to sell the place and find a replacement. We now have plenty of room for the family too grow on a slightly smaller section and I'm back trying to piece the old bike back together.

So heres the cases in my new shed waiting for the TR6 to come home from the rafters at work.
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

So one evening afterwork I decided I would start by trial fitting my nice shiny new rods to my crank. One rod locked up solid before the cap even met the rod, with a little measuring I found the big end bore had been machined undersized. I spoke with the supplier in the UK who was happy for me to send the rod back for him to take a look. Thought about it but decided instead I would drop the rods to the guys that sleeved the barrel for my T120R, for $120 it was sorted.

So a couple of nights ago after the wee ones were in bed I slung the cases in the BBQ and the main bearings in the freezer. Hopefully tomorrow night I'll be clamping them together.
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

She will run again!

Rod


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Another bit of spare time used up once the bin lids had crashed.

After a smear of three bond, a quick jiggle was followed by yet an other satisfying "donk" as the case halves met each other once more.
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

All bolted up,
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

and a test fit of the new outer cover screws, I never have much liked the cap screws.
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

I'll look at getting the timing gears and oil pump assembled hopefully tomorrow so I can button up the cover. Then I need to get the barrel scrubbed up, I soaked the bores in chain wax before putting it to one side. The pistons have been through the bead blaster and the original rings will go back in. The gear box has had a new high gear bush and I have a new pair of selector forks to slot in and the primary is all pretty much new so will simply go back together.

Then it's time to sort the balls up the Cylinder Head Shop made of head............

Rod


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I found these again while we were moving house, the prices make you feel a little sick!
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

Interestingly when he mentions that he machined the main bearing journals, what he means is that he knurled them. Made it a [***] of a job to take apart first time as he also liberally coated the journals and the bearing bores in the cases with bearing fit. He also coated the inside of the crank gear along with the mating face against the washer with Loctite before fitting it and used Loctite on the nut. This time around I gently polished the journals with worn Emery cloth to smooth out the Knurling and them checked they were in spec. Seems it was just a misguided " Belt and braces " attempt on his part.

Rod


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Slowly, slowly catchy monkey.

I really want to get more time in but currently keeping the Wife and Kids sane is more important.

On went the timing gears, was sure I had a suitable socket for the exhaust and crank pinions but apparently not. Will have to sneak off to work.
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

New bottom cup and cone fitted though and front end back on. The old girl still looks a shadow of her former self.
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

Rod


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Frustratingly slow progress,

Gearbox and inner cover assembled
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

Rod


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Waiting for Baby Girl to wake up for a feed so I slipped back out in the shed with the intention of just cleaning up the barrel and slipping it on, got that done and she was still asleep so I figured I may as well slip the motor in the frame before it's too heavy for me to do on my own.

[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

So thats me about as happy as a gang of pubic lice in a backpackers.

Rod


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Very nice, Rod! The TR6 is coming back to life in new surroundings, and will be even better than before. I love those old receipts you found.

Did the Morris Minor make the move with you?

I see the T120 has a glimpse or two of stanchion tube showing through her gaiters, but I guess I shouldn't bring that up for fear of getting you upset. facepalm


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Yeah, I'm more annoyed that I keep ordering parts and forgetting to order gaiters at this point. Those gaiters were splitting before the maiden voyage.

The Morrie is parked up at work but is pretty much for sale. Ive always wanted to restore an early Low Light but it now not likely to happen till I retire. Think I would rather play with bikes at that point.

Rod


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For whatever reason, the gaiters on my TR6 are still good after 9 years. I've read on here of some that turn into ringlets within a year or less. I probably shouldn't have said anything!

Too bad about the car, but you have a lot more important things gojng on now. I hope you and your family enjoy the new house (with the nice big garage).

Good luck with your TR6; I know you've missed it.


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Looking good Rod, ,will be running soon enough.


66 TR6R Trophy
67 T120R Bonneville
68 BMW R60/US
69 T100R Daytona

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Well I haven't been completely idle. Stripped and cleaned the oil pump and buttoned up the timing cover. Fitted the outer gearbox cover and oil junction block. Cleaned and refitted the oil pressure relief valve.

Assembled the primary with the exception of tightening up the main shaft nut......it was late.

Replaced the bearings in the rear wheel and assembled with freshly plated hardware that had previously been chromed. Still need to blast and paint the brake plate but having a wheel fitted makes me feel better.

Gave the oil tank a quick scuff and polish and assembled along with the battery tray and straps. Also test fitted the side panel after replacing one of the mounting studs.

Attended to some wiring connections having stocked up on bullets.

Found all the bits to refit the steering damper.

And sorted the oil filter mounting.

And sorted through all my boxes condensing them down to two.
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

Rod

Last edited by R Moulding; 05/01/20 8:56 pm.

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I'm still plodding about sorting little bits whilst I wait to get the head sorted. For the most part the cycle bits are mostly assembled.

Ray, if your still looking in. Can you remember if Julia's chain guard front mount had a shouldered bolt and Thackeray washer? If so how did it go together?

Rod


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Originally Posted by R Moulding
I'm still plodding about sorting little bits whilst I wait to get the head sorted. For the most part the cycle bits are mostly assembled.

Ray, if your still looking in. Can you remember if Julia's chain guard front mount had a shouldered bolt and Thackeray washer? If so how did it go together?

Rod
Your '66 is looking great, Rod.

I dug up some old pictures for you, showing the chain guard hardware. Here is a play by play rundown, with way more than you asked for. Just ignore the parts you don't need. laughing

Disclaimer: All of this is from my foggy memory. I haven't laid hands on any of this for about four years, so if something doesn't seem to make sense, ask me and I will try to sort it out.

Yes, there is a shouldered bolt and Thackery washer. It is a pivot bolt for the front end of the chain guard. When you need to remove the back wheel, you must first remove the bolt and spacer that attach the skirt of the chain guard to the rear brake reaction arm. Here are a couple shots of that, removed from the bike (You don't need to remove the reaction arm, just the bolt, spacer, and washer. I am using a file picture here):

[Linked Image from tr6ray.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from tr6ray.zenfolio.com]

Then you can loosen the nut holding the slotted bracket at the rear of the chain guard, and lift the guard up. Here is the special bolt for the rear of the guard, with its head that fits the slot in the chain guard bracket. You only need one wrench to loosen the outboard nut, because the head of the bolt is prevented from turning by its fitment in the slot.

[Linked Image from tr6ray.zenfolio.com]

Here is the guard lifted and tied up with a piece of string:

[Linked Image from tr6ray.zenfolio.com]

As you lift the rear end of the chain guard, the front end pivots on the shouldered pivot bolt. Orientation of the pivot bolt and its mating washers and lock nut is shown backwards in the parts book, which makes it a bit confusing. Shown below is a grab from the book, with other bits erased away. Mentally flip items 28 thru 31 end for end, which means the bolt head should be on the LH (Drive side) of the bike. Item #27 is the large rubber access plug, which I will describe further below.

So, item #28 is the shoulder bolt, which gets inserted from the drive side. The shoulder will pass through the hole in the chain guard and through the hole in the tab on the swingarm. Then, item #29, the Thackery washer goes on from the timing side, followed by item #30, flat washer, and item #31, self-locking nut. The nut and flat washer fit up against the shoulder of the bolt, but the Thackery washer is larger diameter -- so it slips onto the shouldered part of the bolt. It somewhat tensions the the chain guard against the swingarm tab, but allows the guard to pivot upwards when you need it to.

[Linked Image from tr6ray.zenfolio.com]

In more detail, on the DS outer part of the chain guard, there is an access hole, filled by a large rubber plug:

[Linked Image from tr6ray.zenfolio.com]

With the plug removed, you can see the rear drive chain, and behind the chain you can see the head of the shouldered bolt.

[Linked Image from tr6ray.zenfolio.com]

Here is a picture of the bolt, Thackery washer, and self-locking nut from my '64 TR6R, when they were blasted and ready for cad plating. Missing from the picture is a plain flat washer. Note how thin the head is on this special bolt (part number F-4135 or 82-4135). It has to be thin to allow clearance for the rear drive chain, which runs closely in front of the bolt head. Also note the diameters of the Thackery washer and the nut, relative to the shoulder and the threaded portions of the bolt:

[Linked Image from tr6ray.zenfolio.com]

Here is a view from the rear sprocket, looking forward on the bike, with the chain guard lifted and tied up with string. On the left, you can see the access hole (rubber plug removed) as viewed from inside the chain guard. On the right, you can see the head of the pivot bolt, as installed on the bike.

[Linked Image from tr6ray.zenfolio.com]

As you can see, the purpose of the large rubber plug is to allow access to the pivot bolt if you find it necessary to remove or install the chain guard.

Finally, here is a picture from the timing side of the bike, showing the shouldered bolt installed through the chain guard and through the swingarm tab, with its Thackery washer, flat washer, and self-locking nut. This, then, is your end goal (ignoring the fact that you still need to get that cylinder head back onto your engine).

[Linked Image from tr6ray.zenfolio.com]

Hope this helps. I must say that I am impressed that the carpet on your new garage floor still looks new and there is no paint, grease, rips, or beer stains showing yet (at least not in the pictures you have posted so far). I really thought you would have ripped that out and built a paint booth before moving into the new place, but I read that you are experimenting with rattle can paint for somewhere outside the garage. I guess SWMBO is truly ruling the roost, which may be all for the best!

Ray


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"way more information than you need"

...but JUST enough to keep us interested!


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Ray, you are a Gent and a Scholar my old China. The TR6 has a QD wheel so you actually don't need to pivot the chain guard unless you need to remove the drum assembly it has always had a nut and bolt. However when I put the Bonnie together which has a standard assembly I was unable to find anyone selling the shouldered bolt assembly. Finally got one for each from Dragonfly so I can ease my OCD! It was the parts book that had me confused as it didn't make sense to have the bolt inserted from the timing side.

Seems Triumph revised the reaction arm attachment after 64. Mine has an L bracket welded to the fin of the chain guard, this bolts to a P clip on the reaction arm. Come to think of it, I need to look if I actually fitted the P clip to the Bonnie. The 66 parts book shows that bracket as a separate part thats no longer required so I guess it changed for 65 and was bolted on.

As for actual progress. I dug out a spare front brake plate the other night, got it blasted, sanded, polished, assembled and fitted. That means I no longer have chunks missing from the leading edge of the rim of the plate, previous owner tried to leaver it out with a screw driver! Yes I've had a play with some rattle cans, will be the last time I ever do that it looks rubbish but will get me riding. Since we moved workshops I can no longer walk to work so I have been cycling, borrowing loan cars and more recently screaming round on this little scooter thats just been sold. So I need my daily hack back!
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

Rod


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Rod, that scooter looks like fun, but I don't think you'll miss it at all when your TR6 is back on the road. Soon, very soon!


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A distraction.

Currently the head for my TR6 still has not gone off to the machinist so I've been looking for something to do. Since the old Low Light Morrie did not sell and it's sat at work I decided to have a play at some rust repairs. I'm well and truely out of practise at this kind of work so it's a little rough round the edges.

Before the Wee man came along I had removed the left A post and part of the inner flitch in order to access the inner sill I knew was missing.
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]
In order to get the required certification I matched the steel thickness and made up a simple patch, the silver paint is weld through primer, also required for certification.
[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]
I had to straighten the remains of the rotten floor and clamp some angle iron to it in order to keep everything in the right place before welding the inner sill. It's not bike related but if anyone is interested I'll slip in a few more pics before the head comes back.

Rod


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Originally Posted by R Moulding
. . . It's not bike related but if anyone is interested I'll slip in a few more pics before the head comes back.

Rod
Go for it, Rod. It's been parked next to your Triumphs for so long that it has become bike related. What is the certification you mentioned?


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