Britbike forum

Classic British Spares Klempf British PartsBaxter Cycle BritBike Sponsor SteadfastCyclesSRM Engineering Lucas Classic Motorcycle Industrial tec supply Hepolite Pistons The Bonneville ShopLowbrow Customs

Upgrade your membership to: Premium Membership | Gold Membership | Life Membership | Vendor Membership | Site Sponsor Membership
Member Spotlight
BritTwit
BritTwit
Kansas City area
Posts: 675
Joined: December 2005
ShoutChat
Comment Guidelines: Do post respectful and insightful comments. Don't flame, hate, spam.
Top Posters(30 Days)
Rohan 86
quinten 75
Top Likes Received (30 Days)
Newest Members
Daytona72, Kurtis Flying Tiger, Edalfa, SDiff, Chopperbabe
11,846 Registered Users
Who's Online Now
6 members (C.B.S, rightshifter, Rohan, BikeVice, koan58, Hillbilly bike), 33 guests, and 70 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,956
Likes: 159
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,956
Likes: 159
KIDS, DON'T TRY THIS AT HOME.

"You have been warned"

Before I got my Doc Z Solo Starter

[Linked Image]

(starting rollers), I had a sure-fire way of eliminating all possible reasons for an engine not starting due to my physical weakness, or some particular bike's penchant for start-up routine particulars:

Needed items:

1. Bike that won't start, but with good battery and plenty of gas, spark, flow through carbs, etc.

2. Tow vehicle with driver who has demonstrated at least medium intellect.

3. 30' length of sturdy, thin diameter tow rope.

4. Helmet and gloves, and other protective wear as you personally believe is prudent.

5. Nearby open road of at least 1/4 mile of right-of-way space.

I think everyone can see where I'm going with this?

KEY ON

FUEL TAPS ON, carbs tickled

ENRICHER SLIDES LOWERED

Set up the tow vehicle & tow rope, align the bike, wrap the tow rope around the left handlebar, taking care that it can freely slip off when you release it, then place the bitter end (no knots) over the left grip.

Get a firm grip, gather your wits, shift the bike into SECOND gear, and nod to the tow driver to indicate ready to go.

Remember, you will need to be pushing pretty stiffly on the right handlebar to offset the tow forces.

Maybe do a practice take-off to get the feel for it before attempting a start in earnest.

Tow driver only needs to start very slowly, pick up gradually to 10 MPH, and maintain speed; the hard part is all on the rider.

As the tow vehicle takes off, you "walk" the bike to avoid a starting [***].

Once the tow driver reaches 10 MPH, he should signal (with a short honk?).

Drop the clutch and HOLD ON TIGHT. * * * (see bottom of post after reading the following section)

Bike should start straight away. If it doesn't immediately start, feed in a slight twist of throttle.

AS SOON AS BIKE STARTS, release the tow rope by lifting your left palm (don't let go of the grip).

Blip the throttle, gas it, or do whatever the heck you think you ought to do, but keep it lit!

If the bike doesn't start after releasing the clutch and towing it more than a couple hundred feet, IT'S NOT GOING TO START.

Oh, yeah, you did have the key & fuel taps on, right?

If the key & fuel taps were on, and it didn't start, go back to the garage and figure out what went wrong.

My wyfe and I have successfully employed this method several times, with very good results and zero visits to the emergency room.

* * * The other possibility is that, at this point, you totally miscalculated this entire process and are only recently waking up in hospital or picking bits of pebbles out of your kneecaps, elbows and palms. Go back and re-read the FIRST two sentences of this post...



GrandPaul (does not use emoticons)
Author of the book "Old Bikes"
Too many bikes to list, mostly Triumph & Norton, a BSA, & some Japanese
"The Iron in your blood should be Vintage"
British motorcycles on eBay
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 2,225
Likes: 1
D
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
D
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 2,225
Likes: 1
Funny, guess you don't have any hills way down south.

I've done this with my Husqvarna.. watch out for that rope!

Don in Nipomo

Joined: May 2010
Posts: 2,646
Likes: 15
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 2,646
Likes: 15
Good write-up, GrandPaul. It made me think of an incident told to me by a friend. This happened in his younger days, when he was out dirt biking with his brother. The brother's bike quit and they decided to tow it home. Seems all they had were some bungee cords which they tied together, but hooked the final one onto the handlebar brace on the dead bike. They almost made it home when -- you guessed it -- the hook straightened out and the bungee cord let go of the handlebar. It then sailed up and smacked the lead dog in the middle of the back. I think there might have been alcohol involved in that episode, though. Funny, he doesn't drink anymore.

Ray


'64 TR6R Plus some Twins from other countries (U.S., Germany, Japan)
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 7,319
Likes: 166
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 7,319
Likes: 166
Been there before.
That routine used to be a regular Spring ritual, before I discovered the drain plugs on the Amals.
Might take a mile or two before all the moisture "burns" out of the float bowls. laughing

Don: I've also pushed a Trident back home after a mile of hill would not start it. Only problem where I live now is that I'm surrounded by hills, but they all go up from my house.


Knowledge speaks. Wisdom listens.

72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"
92 BMW K100rs "Gustav"
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,956
Likes: 159
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,956
Likes: 159
Laredo is flat as a pancake unless you are pushing a dead bike, then everything seems to be uphill.


GrandPaul (does not use emoticons)
Author of the book "Old Bikes"
Too many bikes to list, mostly Triumph & Norton, a BSA, & some Japanese
"The Iron in your blood should be Vintage"
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 134
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 134
GrandPaul, Is Laredo as flat as Levelland ?

Guess it really doesn't matter when you're pushing...
Billy


Bunch of 60s Bonnies (mostly in pieces), a 46/48 T100 project, a 73 Commando Interstate, 58 Cub, 68 Norton P11 project and one barely started slimline/pre unit Triton
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 916
T
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
T
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 916
Timely post, GP!
Just assembled my Doc Z SOLO starter bought as a Christmas present to myself to assist in my project. Annoyingly, this coincides with me having only one working achilles tendon so progress has stalled a bit as I work out what I need in the way of assistance!
Your checklist may have been slightly tongue-in-cheek but valid, just the same.
In the past, I have been tow- and winch-launched in my paraglider. I think I may still have the quick-release device called a "three-ringed circus", which I would recommend to those who don't have a roller starter and want to be towed!


mike
Member #: 147
1960 T120 Bonneville
1999 H*%^a VFR 800 FI
V4 Triton Project (still keeping me sane (Ha-Ha!))
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,956
Likes: 159
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,956
Likes: 159
Originally Posted by t120mike
Just assembled my Doc Z SOLO starter bought as a Christmas present to myself to assist in my project. Annoyingly, this coincides with me having only one working achilles tendon so progress has stalled a bit as I work out what I need in the way of assistance!


It's called a "Solo" Starter, and it CAN be used 'solo' quite successfully. A good working front brake is a necessary thing, rider weight must somewhat correspond to compression ratio, and the "vertically challenged" may have issues. Otherwise, it sure helps to have an assistant standing by "just in case".

My 650 Bonnie with 9:1 pistons @ +.020 is JUST all I can handle at 140# and on my tippy-toes on the solo. Any higher compression, or if my inseam was 1/2" shorter (I'm a 31" inseam), or if I weighed 125 - 130#, I don't know if I could pull it off. The bike will start bucking off the rollers and you have to start the routine over.


GrandPaul (does not use emoticons)
Author of the book "Old Bikes"
Too many bikes to list, mostly Triumph & Norton, a BSA, & some Japanese
"The Iron in your blood should be Vintage"

Moderated by  bill50cal 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Job CycleBritish Cycle SupplyMorries PlaceKlempf British PartsPodtronicVintage MagazineBSA Unit SinglesBritBike SponsorBritish Tools & FastenersBritBike SponsorBritBike Sponsor






© 1996-2021 britbike.com
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5