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I have a conundrum....I have the opportunity to take another job...the problem is I would be taking a $20,000 a year pay cut for the first five years I would be there. The hours at the new job would be 07:30 to 3:30, five days a week. Every weekend off and all gov't holidays (it'a PA state job)It's also a Prison!

My present job I work a 12 hour rotating swing shift; meaning I'm on for 3 12 hr day shifts, have a day and a half off then work two 12 hr night shifts, then have two days off and then it's right back to day shift again. It really makes me grumpy when I come off of a few nights and try to rotate back to days. mad I have been doing this for 15 years now and this swing back and forth from days to nights to days is really wearing on me. The company I work for is in the top 20 of the Fortune 500 list and is fairly secure. For those of you who don't know, I'm an Industrial Electrician and this is a huge factory I work in.

BTW, I'm 52. So my question to you my Brit Bike compadres...Would I be a complete dumba** to change horses now and take this financial hit for five years?

One more sad thing. I will probably have to sell at least one of my bikes to be able to do this mad


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Wow, sounds like me!

When I was 52, I left my job with a big company, not knowing where I would be working next, and ended with a job that paid a little less but had more of what I wanted out of life, including flexible schedules.

It's always sort of "unnerving" to leave what might be a secure job and leap into something else (although it sounds like your new job will be secure too, at least as far as these things can be, nothing's guaranteed, never was). Especially at our age - although there's a 'law' against Age Discrimination, most employers do it anyway because it's so hard to prove; the interviewer would practically have to say "We don't want any gray-haired old guys with possible health problems that will only work 7 or 8 years for us", and you video-tape it, to make the charge stick.

Working the swing-shift schedule you've been on would drive me into sleep-deprived insanity, so it would be an easy decision for me. Consider your health and well-being.

Also don't make any quick decisions about selling bikes (unless you'd like to sell me that Norton cheap! wink ). See how things go; when I was between jobs, we made a bunch of adjustments that weren't hard but I didn't have to sell any bikes, it could work out that way for you!

Good Luck!

Lannis


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Originally Posted by Muddymartini
One more sad thing. I will probably have to sell at least one of my bikes to be able to do this

Since your posting says "no britbike content" we have to assume that no britbikes will be sold!, so keep the Norton?
Reading between the lines of your post it seems you've already convinced yourself to go for it.
Given the state of affairs in todays world, a 'gummint'job seems like a good proposition to me- my advice would be to take it and see, you never know whats around the next corner anyway.
When i go home later today, my faithful furry friend of 13 years will not be behind the door when i get there- you just never know.
(Sad Things)


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I feel your pain Brien. Last month I had to have my old guy put to sleep. He was the smartest dog I ever owned. Last week I adopted a 10 month old Lab/Shepard mix from the animal shelter, that boy is dumb as stump.


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Originally Posted by Lannis
Wow, sounds like me!

When I was 52, I left my job with a big company, not knowing where I would be working next, and ended with a job that paid a little less but had more of what I wanted out of life, including flexible schedules.

It's always sort of "unnerving" to leave what might be a secure job and leap into something else (although it sounds like your new job will be secure too, at least as far as these things can be, nothing's guaranteed, never was). Especially at our age - although there's a 'law' against Age Discrimination, most employers do it anyway because it's so hard to prove; the interviewer would practically have to say "We don't want any gray-haired old guys with possible health problems that will only work 7 or 8 years for us", and you video-tape it, to make the charge stick.

Working the swing-shift schedule you've been on would drive me into sleep-deprived insanity, so it would be an easy decision for me. Consider your health and well-being.

Also don't make any quick decisions about selling bikes (unless you'd like to sell me that Norton cheap! wink ). See how things go; when I was between jobs, we made a bunch of adjustments that weren't hard but I didn't have to sell any bikes, it could work out that way for you!

Good Luck!

Lannis


Thanks Lannis, It's a tough decision and a little scary. Things will probably be tight $ wise for a year or two but I know I will probably feel better physically if I take it. The swing shift gets tougher and tougher each year. After working three 12 hr nightshifts in a row I'm pretty grumpy the next day or so...not to mention I go right back to dayshift after only a day and a half off.

As far as the Norton goes they'll probably be burying me with THAT bike!



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I work midnight shift through no decision of my own, and if I had another opportunity like you...I would jump all over it...Of course I hate the management I work for, they treat me like crap, and are trying to make me quit, just because I worked for another company 15 years ago (ValuJet). Im very disgruntled though, but still, dayshift means ALOT....


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Originally Posted by DPO
but still, dayshift means ALOT....


It really does, as does an 8 hour shift. Those 12 hour night shifts are killing me. After all we're fighting a million years of evolution trying to be nocturnal. It's just not Natural!


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Rotating shifts stink! Losing $20,000 a year also stinks. But your sanity and health are far more important than money. As we get older it gets tougher. So for what its worth my opinion would be go for the new job. I'm retiring this yearand looking forward to it. A couple of years ago the company I work for went a bit quiet. I was asked to go on a three day week. I agreed and after a while I was loving it. So much so I asked to stay permenantly on a three day week. As far as the loss of income. You'll adjust. Good luck with thenew job (if you take it).


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I understand what you're going thru. Last year at age 54, I left a secure job because the 2 hour commutes and 12+ hour work days were killing me. Took a job in No. Calif. The new job is a mess and will take me 2 or 3 years to straighten out but a year into it, I'm glad I did it. After moving to a new house and getting the family settled, I can finally start working on my bikes again. And I'll live long enough to actually finish them. Make sure that the change is what you really want and not just a temporary burnout. If the change is what you really want, then go for it. Also don't sell the Norton unless you're going to buy a BSA. Good luck

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Quote
Originally Posted by noisy norton
Rotating shifts stink! But your sanity and health are far more important than money.


Amen brother! My older brother gave me the same advice.


[quote]I'm retiring this yearand looking forward to it.


Congrats on the retirement! More time to fettle!


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Originally Posted by Beezer Bob
Also don't sell the Norton unless you're going to buy a BSA. Good luck


If it came down to having to sell the Norton I would suffer through with my present job...I would like to add a BSA but guess that will have to wait for now. I am probably go to sell my restored Daytona.



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Lannis (temporary highjack) you're second on the list for a nice mk3 i'm working on.

Now back to the real thread.

I could never understand how anyone could work that swing shift or why the company would schedual that way.


Rich
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my man,
do what you KNOW is best bro.
swing shift is known to subtract years from one's life span.

on the other hand, pyschological profiling of prison employees shows them to be about as stable as the average serial killer....

WHAT is the job description, exactly bro?

for daylights and weekends off, paid vacation plus multiple types of assorted other leave, AND a great health plan???

why pass that up? it's a leap of faith...look for the book "Between Trapezes", all about that moment when you are suspended in space, literally between your *trapezes*...
so many people do not make the change they know they need because they are simply afraid of the unknown...

go for it man...


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Originally Posted by ricochetrider
my man,
do what you KNOW is best bro.
swing shift is known to subtract years from one's life span.

Yes,I do believe it shortens your lifespan, I have seen some retirees that left at 55 and looked 90!


Quote
WHAT is the job description, exactly bro?


I would be an Electrician, basically the inmates do all the work and I would just supervise!


Quote
for daylights and weekends off, paid vacation plus multiple types of assorted other leave, AND a great health plan???


Another benefit is the free cafeteria...You can't take anything inside the wire (including a lunch) so they provide food!


Quote
why pass that up? it's a leap of faith...look for the book "Between Trapezes", all about that moment when you are suspended in space, literally between your *trapezes*...
so many people do not make the change they know they need because they are simply afraid of the unknown...


go for it man...
[/quote]

The pendulum is defintely swinging in the direction of the Prison. I think you are right Tom, it's a leap of faith out of my comfort zone and that is part of my concern

Last edited by dirtymartini; 05/07/10 12:04 pm. Reason: spelling

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Originally Posted by Richrd
Lannis (temporary highjack) you're second on the list for a nice mk3 i'm working on.

Now back to the real thread.

I could never understand how anyone could work that swing shift or why the company would schedual that way.


Well, as bad as swing shift is, the alternative's worse.

A company that has a huge capital investment in machinery can't let it sit idle 16 hours a day. Not only that, but a lot of process industries (refineries, power generation, chemical plants) have to run constantly, 24 hours a day. Hospitals can't send people home at 4:30 PM and tell them to come back and get hooked up to the tubes at 8:00 the next morning when the staff comes back in.

So what do you do when your facility has to run 24/7? You COULD have a permanent first shift 0700-1500, a permanent second 1500-2300, and a permanent third shift 2300-0700.

Problem is, people HATE that. The ones that are working permanent second shift never get to see their kids' little league or soccer games or Thanksgiving paegents or have dinner at home in the evening. Third shift isn't so bad, it's permanent and you can do all the things with your kids if you want.

But people, if you give them a vote, will vote for swing shifts over a permanent second shift every time. We did that several times where I used to work, and the hourly work force voted for swing shifts every time EVEN THOUGH they're a pain in the butt, because they're better than the alternative!

A lot of times, a guy with no kids who farmed on the side and wanted to be off during the day and work at night, would "swap" with a guy who wanted all-daylight, and the pair could then work permanent shifts, and that worked out OK ....

Lannis


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I just heard through the grapevine that I am going to be offered the job...and I think I'm going to take it as scary as it may be. No more swing shift clap No more weekends beerchug

There wil be a lot less money for for Brit Bikes for a bit but in the long run I think it's a good move.

Now maybe I can get to some of these events on the weekends and meet up with some of you. :bigt


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DUDE!
an electrician (on a maintenence crew??) supervising inmate labor is probably a great gig, honestly...

thank gawd you don't have to be on the *floor* as a gaurd- i wouldn't advocate that to anyone!

those dudes are SERIOUSLY effed UP...how do you think all the dope gets into freakin prisons? who is always going up for running rackets, trading female inmates sex for favors, and other general abuse such as that? the GAURDS, that's who. sadisitc psychopaths, total sickos...

ah, listen bro- i wouldn't get TOO wound up about FREE food...unless it is different from what they feed the inmates! laughing

all the best man...hope it works out for you


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Originally Posted by dirtymartini
I just heard through the grapevine that I am going to be offered the job...and I think I'm going to take it as scary as it may be. No more swing shift clap No more weekends beerchug

There wil be a lot less money for for Brit Bikes for a bit but in the long run I think it's a good move.

Now maybe I can get to some of these events on the weekends and meet up with some of you. :bigt


Good, and I hope it works out for you.

I hadn't realized that you would be supervising inmates that are doing electrical work .... I assume these are the "trustys" ? The kind that they let drive a truck into town every now and again?

I'm not an electrician, but I studied up on it and was able to wire my own house, all 20 amp circuits and two 200 amp breaker boxes, way over what the code required, and I remember the tools I used to do the job!

Sharp wire strippers, cable cutters, Klein diagonal cutting dykes, screwdrivers, drills, fishing tapes .... I hope these guys will be OK with that stuff!

Lannis


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I agree with Lannis' opinion [ref above] and reckon you will be a happier bloke if you take the new Gig.

Also consider that you will be able to attend to chores and such around the home that you may have previously contracted out.

Only overbearing mortgage pressure would have me back working bizarre hours.


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Quote
DUDE!
an electrician (on a maintenence crew??) supervising inmate labor is probably a great gig, honestly...


Honestly the inmates do all the work, I'll just be supervising and answering questions. The best part is I'll be working with another electrician who used to work where I do now...he left and went there too!

Quote
thank gawd you don't have to be on the *floor* as a gaurd- i wouldn't advocate that to anyone!

those dudes are SERIOUSLY effed UP...how do you think all the dope gets into freakin prisons? who is always going up for running rackets, trading female inmates sex for favors, and other general abuse such as that? the GAURDS, that's who. sadisitc psychopaths, total sickos...


Yeah I know what you mean...I think some of them get off on that behavior. It catches up with them eventually.

Quote
ah, listen bro- i wouldn't get TOO wound up about FREE food...unless it is different from what they feed the inmates! laughing


My wife works at the same prison as a counselor and she won't eat the food laughing Me I'm not so picky...as long as it doesn't make me sick I figure I can save a lot of money eating breakfast and lunch there :bigt

Quote
all the best man...hope it works out for you


Thanks Tom, hope to meet up with you one of these days.



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Quote
I hadn't realized that you would be supervising inmates that are doing electrical work .... I assume these are the "trustys" ? The kind that they let drive a truck into town every now and again?

I'm not an electrician, but I studied up on it and was able to wire my own house, all 20 amp circuits and two 200 amp breaker boxes, way over what the code required, and I remember the tools I used to do the job!

Sharp wire strippers, cable cutters, Klein diagonal cutting dykes, screwdrivers, drills, fishing tapes .... I hope these guys will be OK with that stuff!

Lannis


The inmates they allow to do this kind of work are on their best behavior and have demonstrated for a long period of time they can be trusted. Most of these guys are short timers who are looking to get paroled. As you can imagine tool accountability is job one for them...and me of course.


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Originally Posted by dirtymartini




Quote
I hadn't realized that you would be supervising inmates that are doing electrical work .... I assume these are the "trustys" ? The kind that they let drive a truck into town every now and again?

I'm not an electrician, but I studied up on it and was able to wire my own house, all 20 amp circuits and two 200 amp breaker boxes, way over what the code required, and I remember the tools I used to do the job!

Sharp wire strippers, cable cutters, Klein diagonal cutting dykes, screwdrivers, drills, fishing tapes .... I hope these guys will be OK with that stuff!

Lannis


The inmates they allow to do this kind of work are on their best behavior and have demonstrated for a long period of time they can be trusted. Most of these guys are short timers who are looking to get paroled. As you can imagine tool accountability is job one for them...and me of course.


I figured the ones you'd be working with would be the "good" ones. I suppose some of the guys actually ARE working to be rehabilitated, although I'm not clear on how you can rehabilitate someone who wasn't habilitated to begin with.

Sounds like you're moving forward and thinking about all the angles, I predict that this will work out well!

Lannis


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sounds like a cake gig to me...
made even better by the fact of you knowing a guy there already.
i am certain the food is a LOT like school lunches, with out all the options that kids nowadays have...
exact same industrial nutrition mentality.

HMMM. your wife seems to have a discriminating palette, however- she has shunned the *food*! laughing


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Originally Posted by ricochetrider


i am certain the food is a LOT like school lunches, with out all the options that kids nowadays have...
exact same industrial nutrition mentality.



Institutional food really isn't USUALLY that bad. People just have a huge prejudice against it, like to make jokes about it, it's something that we can all engage in mutual "recreational whining" about.

Sure, it's not Mom's home cooking. Sure, flaked mashed potatoes don't taste just like real ones. But it's not poison, it's not dog food, and a lot of it isn't bad at all.

If the cafeteria food HERE was free, I'd be into it every day, despite people's daily comments ....

One of my favorite dialogs from the movies -

"Oh, it's bad. On Thursday night they serve a wicked pepper steak.

"Can't be as bad as the cabbage rolls at the Terre Haute Federal Pen.

"Or that oatmeal at the Cook County slammer.

"They're all pretty bad.... laugh

Lannis



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Originally Posted by Lannis
Originally Posted by ricochetrider


i am certain the food is a LOT like school lunches, with out all the options that kids nowadays have...
exact same industrial nutrition mentality.



Institutional food really isn't USUALLY that bad. People just have a huge prejudice against it, like to make jokes about it, it's something that we can all engage in mutual "recreational whining" about.

Sure, it's not Mom's home cooking. Sure, flaked mashed potatoes don't taste just like real ones. But it's not poison, it's not dog food, and a lot of it isn't bad at all.

If the cafeteria food HERE was free, I'd be into it every day, despite people's daily comments ....

One of my favorite dialogs from the movies -

"Oh, it's bad. On Thursday night they serve a wicked pepper steak.

"Can't be as bad as the cabbage rolls at the Terre Haute Federal Pen.

"Or that oatmeal at the Cook County slammer.

"They're all pretty bad.... laugh

Lannis



laughing
guess it's ALL relative right, Lannis? considering that it takes about 45,000.00 (or some such completely ridiculous amount)to clothe, house and feed the average prisoner, the money's GOTTA be going into SOMETHING, right? help

and BTW, don't let ME try to come off all pure...
while, yeah, i like to eat good food that's prepared well and served up proper-like,

i am the FIRST guy to rush out to our local cheezy Greek Diner for the hot dog with everything...
i mean, we ALL have our weaknesses right? wink

Cheers, DM, and good luck on the new J.O.B.
beerchug


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