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I don't know what all the rules are and which states are doing what. Many consider Georgia a hot spot and I think restrict travel from Georgia. Of course If you don't care and don't have a Georgia tag on your vehicle, it's not an issue. And I have no idea if the police will stop you anywhere for traveling to or from states they consider hot spots. I did see a story about the police in New York stopping vehicles at the state border, but as all news nowadays, I don't know whether to believe it or not. But being stopped and forced to quarantine would definitely put a damper on the fun. Of course there is always the option of instructing your lawyer to argue for your constitutional rights as you write him a check.

I can't be sure of the accuracy, but a quick search found the following from here: state restrictions

"Does Massachusetts have restrictions on travel? Yes.
On August 1, enforceable restrictions took effect, requiring all non-exempt travelers to the state to fill out a travel form (unless they are traveling from a state defined as low risk by the Department of Public Health) and either self-quarantine for 14 days or provide a negative COVID-19 test administered no more than 72 hours prior to arrival.[81]

August 1, 2020: Starting Aug. 1, most travelers and returning residents were required fill out a travel form and self-quarantine for 14 days upon entering the state or produce a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of arrival. Travelers from states classified as lower-risk, which included Connecticut, Vermont, and Hawaii, among others, were exempt from the test or quarantine requirements."

Enforceable? What does that mean? Jail? Who wants to go through the process and report back to us? Just a quick example.


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I am going nowhere and have done virtually no research on the subject. Just pointing it out to someone who might be coming from an "unacceptable place", or is coming across many states, that it might be something that might be worth looking at. As an example, I travel a lot in my motorhome and I have done much research on laws in various states about having a firearm in your vehicle. I am usually alone and travel to many remote areas where you will have no telephone service and be unable to call 911. And as my brother once put so eloquently, "I find the older I get, the more I resemble prey.". So I won't travel without one. That is against the law in quite a few states and the penalties can be very severe. So I have to choose to break the law or not go. I have been to 45 of the 50 states, but have never been to Vermont, New Hampshire, or Maine. That's why. And when I have told people about these laws, I have often gotten responses like: "Most cops won't ever arrest you for that", or my favorite "That can't happen in America". I just chuckle.

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Neither Vermont nor New Hampshire have restrictive laws regarding carrying a gun. Concealed carry is legal in NH without a permit, pretty sure that's the case in Vermont as well and I can't imagine Maine is all that different. If it's in a vehicle you might consider keeping it unloaded while moving but once parked you're OK. Don't be scared, come on up and visit us anytime you want!

The problem isn't there. To get there, however, I have to go through Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New York. It is not only illegal in those states to carry a gun, but also to have one in your vehicle. And lets not forget Massachusetts. These laws change and I haven't looked at any of these states for quite awhile, but I doubt if they have eased restrictions.

The Observant one