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Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741756
07/13/18 1:38 pm
07/13/18 1:38 pm
Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 596
Ewing. NJ
E
edunham Offline
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edunham  Offline
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Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 596
Ewing. NJ
The fire extinguisher brings to mind a few other things you may want to carry. When I was doing the East Coast Giro, I carried a flask my cell phone and a couple of cigars. Next time I will add a bottle of water and a cell phone charger (took 9 hours for the chase truck).
You may have your own list of desirable necessities in case of a long wait in the middle of nowhere.

Ed from NJ

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Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741771
07/13/18 4:21 pm
07/13/18 4:21 pm
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 4,478
U.S.
Magnetoman Offline OP

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Magnetoman  Offline OP

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Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 4,478
U.S.
Originally Posted by BSA_WM20
How is the size of the fire extinguisher as comparred to a wine bottle ?
Without deploying the micrometer for an accurate measurement, side-by-side the 2.5 lb. extinguisher seems to be identical in size to a wine bottle. However, after a few trial fittings it seems strapping the sock to the back of the package tray and laying it on the mudguard works fine.

Originally Posted by edunham
a flask my cell phone and a couple of cigars.... a bottle of water and a cell phone charger
Thanks for those suggestions. An iPhone sucks battery power pretty rapidly so I'll have along an external 2500 mAhr battery which will approximately double the operating time. Living in the desert, carrying water always comes to mind, but cigars and whiskey, not so much. But, if I could foresee the breakdown I might switch the fire extinguisher for a bottle of wine that morning and have a picnic while waiting (hopefully not a barbeque...). Although, it would have to be cheap wine (twist-off cap) in case I forgot the corkscrew.

Workers have been at the house since Tuesday making it impossible to make any rides on the Ariel, although it looks like they'll finish today. However, one new development that will help with the next 1928 Ariel I rebuild is the arrival yesterday of a very large set of Sunnen honing stones covering coarse and fine finishes for all sizes and all materials (soft and hard steel, bronze, Al, etc.). I spotted the eBay listing shortly after it was posted, and from the photos it appeared there were a large number of stones in the drawers (which turned out to be accurate), so I grabbed it at the buy-it-now price. At least 95% of the stones have never been used. I had been adding stones for bronze when I came across them so I would be ready when needed, but this set takes care of everything in one fell swoop.

One of my first tasks when I return from the Cannonball will be to rebuild the BB Gold Star's forks. Honing the stanchions, sliders, and bushes to microinches should have the forks operating like teflon on ice as well as make the seals last forever.

Attached Files Sunnen_kit_drawers.jpgSunnen_kit_drawers2.jpg
Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741778
07/13/18 6:04 pm
07/13/18 6:04 pm
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 9,375
Scotland
kommando Online content
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kommando  Online Content
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Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 9,375
Scotland
Have been taking apart a few modern front ends recently, as well tightening up all the fits of the top and bottom bushes are now teflon lined on the wearing side of the split steel bushes, you can obtain by using Glacier DU bushes or their clones (of which there are many). What you will not be able to replicate is the large increase in stanchion diameters but reducing the clearances will get good benefits as long as you use low friction materials to mitigate the stickion, SKF are also doing low friction seals for forks but doubt their diameters go small enough.

Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741786
07/13/18 7:49 pm
07/13/18 7:49 pm
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 4,478
U.S.
Magnetoman Offline OP

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Magnetoman  Offline OP

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Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 4,478
U.S.
Originally Posted by kommando
Glacier DU bushes or their clones
It's interesting that they rate the performance of these teflon bushes as 'very good' when dry, but only 'good' when lubricated with oil. Also, the recommended shaft roughness should be ~1-6x better if lubrication is used. However, even then, the recommended roughness of the stanchion of ≤2-16 µin. is achievable with a 600 grit stone (1 µin.).

Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741794
07/13/18 9:16 pm
07/13/18 9:16 pm
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 9,375
Scotland
kommando Online content
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kommando  Online Content
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Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 9,375
Scotland
The best DU variant had a lead content in the ptfe layer, it's now lead free in the main due to auto end of life regulations, the leaded version had double the life when lubricated over when used dry. Suspect the new advice is for the lead free version, if you get the leaded version then the extended life should hold true. I will try and get the data on the leaded version.

The data you found was for the DU with the lead powder mixed into the PTFE layer, where the confusion lies is the good, fair rating. This is a relative rating between the various bush materials they use but only within the environment stated, so DU is fair compared to the other Glacier bush materials when lubricated and good compared to the other materials in the dry state. It does not mean that DU performs worse in the lubricated condition compared to the dry condition it's just the improvement when lubricated is not as pronounced as other Glacier bush materials.

The US partner for Glacier was Garlock Industries but continuing industry consolidation means I have no idea who it is now.

Last edited by kommando; 07/14/18 8:36 am. Reason: added info on the data
Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741858
07/14/18 4:52 pm
07/14/18 4:52 pm
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 4,478
U.S.
Magnetoman Offline OP

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Magnetoman  Offline OP

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Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 4,478
U.S.
Originally Posted by kommando
where the confusion lies is the good, fair rating. This is a relative rating between the various bush materials....
That is a confusing way of listing relative ratings. But, there's little doubt the friction with these would be lower than with bronze.

Originally Posted by Magnetoman
I found someone in China listing five new 520 units for very low buy-it-now prices. I ordered one and got confirmation, but a little over an hour later got a notice from eBay saying they've removed the other units from eBay "due to concerns with the seller's account." But, that notice goes on to say I still should get the item I ordered.
I never heard from the seller so managed to cancel the order and get my money refunded. I then ordered a used Garmin Edge 510 (also approved for the Cannonball) that arrived very quickly.

Since the battery in any used unit would have an unknown no. of cycles on it I was concerned about battery life so I ran a couple of tests. With the backlight off (the display still should be visible in most daylight conditions), the battery dropped by 59% in 14.5 hours implying a 24.6 hour lifetime. In a shorter (~45 min.) test with the backlight continuously on the discharge rate increased by ~60%, implying a ~14.5 hour lifetime. Taken together, along with Garmin's claim of "up to 20 hours" lifetime, these tests are consistent with the battery behaving essentially as-new. The unit certainly has the capacity for making it through much longer days on the Cannonball than I hope it ever has to. It's on an iPhone charger now, and at the present rate it would take 2.5 hours to fully charge from 0%. .

I had previously bought a cheap watch with altimeter to attach to the handlebars, because I like to know what time it is and the altimeter gives me something interesting to watch instead of the road. But, the Garmin gives me both of these features so I won't need that watch. I set up the display so speed, distance, and time appear in three of the largest boxes, and altitude and battery% side-by-side (the vertical bars in the photograph are scan lines, not visible to the eye). Between looking for oil drips, monitoring the altitude, and watching the battery % drop I only should have to infrequently glance up at the road. Despite the features of the Garmin, when the bicycle unit kommando recommended arrives I'll install and calibrate it as well to have a backup. And to give me something additional to watch instead of the road...

Attached Files GarminEdge510.jpg
Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #742049
11 hours ago
11 hours ago
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 4,478
U.S.
Magnetoman Offline OP

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Magnetoman  Offline OP

BritBike Forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 4,478
U.S.
The Ariel manual calls for draining the crankcase every 1000 miles, but as a result of exchanging several emails with a friend in Cork who has a '29 Ariel I decided to see how much oil had accumulated so far. I learned two things from doing this: 1) a surprising amount of oil was there (30 mL) after only a relatively small number of miles, and 2) it's a real headache to drain the sump thanks to the bolt being in direct line with a frame tube with less than a 3/8" gap. It's fiddly to unscrew the bolt and even more so to get the bolt correctly started again in the threads. And that's when the bike is 3 ft. off the ground on a lift making it as easy as possible to get to the bolt.

Instead of putting the bolt back in and riding today, I decided it was important to do something about this bolt since draining the sump could end up being a daily ritual. Even if it proves unnecessary to do it daily, draining the crankcase frequently in the runup to the start will give me important information about whether I'm over/under oiling the engine.

The first photograph shows that I cut an appropriate bolt to length, drilled and cross-drilled it, and silver soldered a piece of 1/4" OD Cu tubing into place. I didn't bother drilling the head for safety wire since the Cu pipe will keep it from unscrewing. The second photograph shows two views of the new bolt in the engine with a short piece of black tubing connecting it to a ball valve. The location of frame tubes along with the need for the outlet of the valve to be at least as low as the outlet from the crankcase, but not any lower than the lowest point on the motorcycle, dictates the location of the valve. It's not clear from the photograph but I shortened the end of the operating lever to clear a cross tube. The present safety wire holding the valve firmly in position may give way to a machined bracket if there's time in the next few weeks, but the safety wire could end up being permanent.

With the ball valve it's now an easy 2 second job to drain the sump rather than a longer fussy process that would have given me 14 opportunities to cross-thread the crankcase, or dislocate my back laying on the ground and twisting to reach the bolt, during the Cannonball.

Attached Files Oil_drain_bolt.jpgOil_drain_valve.jpg
Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #742053
10 hours ago
10 hours ago
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 3,740
Sydney Australia
B
BSA_WM20 Offline
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Joined: May 2004
Posts: 3,740
Sydney Australia
I had a bike unit fitted to the M20 for a few years with mixed success, however one big problem was sunlight - heat affecting the LCD display causing it to go full black till it cooled down.
Now you might get enough breeze on your super sonic Ariel to keep it cool but before you go you might like to leave one of the displays in the sun for a few hours and see how the screen display handles it.
Of course if you are planning a full day 300 mile run on a hot day then you will know how the unit should handle the heat during the cannonball.
Accuracy is nice but of little use if you can not read the screen or even worse it overheats and resets itself.

Last edited by BSA_WM20; 10 hours ago.

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