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#588116 - 03/02/15 5:30 am Re: Language question US English [Re: Ger B]  
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Ger B Offline
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Quote:
thumb wheels that operate the jaws in the opposite rotation to USA versions

Correct. I found that in Brasil where they use the US-type tools.

Quote:
he first time I came across an adjustable spanner/wrench I was told it was a Bahco.
In Western Europe everybody says bahco to a bahco as Bahco is the largest producer of bahco's.

I prefer the Bahco bahco since the beaks are thinner than on bahco's of other manufacturers, and the adjusting machanism has less play - is more acurate.

Do you fellows know what a monkey spanner (or wrench) is?
Or a Wilton Feyenoord spanner? (Wilton Feyenoord was a major ship repair yard in Rotterdam. It changed name under a new owner).


Last edited by Ger B; 03/02/15 5:38 am.

Ger B

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#588126 - 03/02/15 8:26 am Re: Language question US English [Re: Ger B]  
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AngloBike Online content
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I call the adjustable spanner an AJ. (Ay-Yay)

In the grip/theatre/roadie world, AJ is the general term for such a spanner.
Monkey Wrench is the slab sided adjustable.

Molegrips are "vice/vise" grips made in the UK by a company called Mole

Last edited by AngloBike; 03/02/15 8:26 am.
#588975 - 03/06/15 10:07 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: Ger B]  
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RF Whatley Online content
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North Georgia, USA
Originally Posted By Ger B
Do you fellows know what a monkey wrench is?



Why yes. Keeps one in me tool box. A hand-me-down from me dear old grandpaps.


Don't hide 'em, Ride 'em !!

RF Whatley
Cornelia, GA

"Shop Boy" at Rodi British Bikes
#588980 - 03/06/15 11:06 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: Ger B]  
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A while ago BeezaBryon posted this picture of a BSA factory tool kit.




I was so tickled by the photo, that I sent the photo to a historian friend I have. This is his response:

"Swedish adjustable end wrench for a British bike? Really?

Well, at least it's a BAHCO - that's like owning a Crescent brand adjustable end wrench here, since it's called a Bahco in Europe. That's because BA Hjorth & Co. bought the marketing rights for the products made by Johan Petter Johansson and his company Enköpings Mekaniska Verkstad (Mechanical Workshop of Enköping) in 1890.

Johan Petter invented the adjustable wrench as we know it today and secured patents in 1891 and 1892. In 1916 Berndt August Hjorth (who also had the sole rights to the Swedish Primus stove - talk about your cash cows) bought all of Enköpings Mekaniska Verkstad and formed AB BA Hjort & Co. (AB - sometimes written as A/B - is short for the Swedish word 'Aktiebolag' - basically translates as 'Corporation.')

In 1954 the name changed to the acronym AB Bahco, and then years later to just Bahco Tools. In 1991 Sandvik AB bought them and the name became Sandvik Bahco, with Bahco Tools being the 'Saws & Tools' division thereof. Shortly after the acquisition, Sandvik's Fish and Hook logo became part of the Bahco logo:



Therefore, that wrench was made between 1954 when an improved handle and new jaw angle of 15 degrees were introduced, and 1984 when the first ergonomic handles (later with 'ERGO' trademark) were introduced. My guess is late 50s to early 60s for this one.

In 1999 Snap-On hoovered up the 'Saws & Tools' portion of Sandvik, so there's that."

Ken


1967 Triumph Mountain Cub
1968 BSA Victor Special
1968 BSA Lightning
1971 BSA Thunderbolt
1971 AJS Stormer
1972 Bultaco Sherpa
#589007 - 03/07/15 4:01 am Re: Language question US English [Re: KennethC.]  
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Peter R Online content
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The name Crescent wrench is new to me, never heard that before.
Everyone in Europe calls these wrenches Bahco.
I have one like the one on your picture.
I don't think Bahco tools are made in Sweden today, I have seen tools lately that have the text "Bahco Industria Argentina" cast in its handle.


Peter.
1974 Commando 850
1972 Trident T150T
1961 Goldie DBD34
1969 Benelli 250 sport special
#589038 - 03/07/15 9:42 am Re: Language question US English [Re: Ger B]  
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Quote:

Do you fellows know what a monkey wrench is?
Why yes. Keeps one in me tool box.

But how about the Wilton Feijenoord wrench or spanner?
I spot one in the picture above by KennethC.


Ger B

#589053 - 03/07/15 10:54 am Re: Language question US English [Re: Peter R]  
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ricochetrider Online content
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Pennsyltuckey
Originally Posted By Peter R
The name Crescent wrench is new to me, never heard that before.
Everyone in Europe calls these wrenches Bahco.
I have one like the one on your picture.
I don't think Bahco tools are made in Sweden today, I have seen tools lately that have the text "Bahco Industria Argentina" cast in its handle.


The name "Crescent" is a brand name, I'd guess it's basically an adjustable wrench, but in the US the word Crescent has become synonymous for this tool.
In the entertainment industry, we call it a "C" wrench- possibly because when opened, it vaguely resembles a "C"? Plus who has time to say "crescent"?


"It is no measure of health, to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society."

#589058 - 03/07/15 11:12 am Re: Language question US English [Re: Ger B]  
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Peter R Online content
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Originally Posted By Ger B
[quote]
But how about the Wilton Feijenoord wrench or spanner?
I spot one in the picture above by KennethC.


Although I grew up in the Rotterdam area, I have never heard of the Wilton Feijenoord wrench.
Is it the big hammer on top of Kenneth's picture ?
I come from an industry where finer tools were usually the norm. smirk grin


Peter.
1974 Commando 850
1972 Trident T150T
1961 Goldie DBD34
1969 Benelli 250 sport special
#589061 - 03/07/15 12:00 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: Ger B]  
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Amateur Loctite enthusiast.
#589062 - 03/07/15 12:05 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: Peter R]  
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Alan_nc Online content
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Greensboro, NC
Tools pictured were ment as a joke:

Crescent (or adjustable wrench) is generally considered to be a "knuckle buster" or "bolt rounder". No "real mechanic" would use one....you find the right size wrench for the bolt.

Hammers:

"Bend to fit, paint to match" Common term in industry along with "if it doesn't fit get a bigger hammer".


It is being hinted that "less than professional" mechanics built out bikes in the first place.

Isn't language a great thing.................


Alan
Cleared m out....left only
59 BSA Bantam (Trials)
78 Triumph Bonny (UPS)
02 Suzuki GS500
#589064 - 03/07/15 12:33 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: Ger B]  
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Quote:
Although I grew up in the Rotterdam area, I have never heard of the Wilton Feijenoord wrench.
Is it the big hammer on top of Kenneth's picture ?

Wilton Feijnoord was a large ship repair yard, now operating under anothe name.
Ships sail in salt water, so on deck, bolts and nut rust.
To remove a rusted nut from rusty thread, you use a WF-spanner which is a hammer and a chissel to hack the nut open.


Ger B

#589066 - 03/07/15 12:41 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: Alan_nc]  
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Originally Posted By Alan_nc

Crescent (or adjustable wrench) is generally considered to be a "knuckle buster" or "bolt rounder". No "real mechanic" would use one....you find the right size wrench for the bolt.


Tell these wrench monkees in the several different TV shows where cars and bkes are restored or "customized" laughing
The crescent wrench, or bahco, seems to be their tool of choice.

Last edited by Peter R; 03/08/15 1:53 pm.

Peter.
1974 Commando 850
1972 Trident T150T
1961 Goldie DBD34
1969 Benelli 250 sport special
#589079 - 03/07/15 1:41 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: Alan_nc]  
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Lannis Online content
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Central Virginia
Originally Posted By Alan_nc
Tools pictured were ment as a joke:

Crescent (or adjustable wrench) is generally considered to be a "knuckle buster" or "bolt rounder". No "real mechanic" would use one....you find the right size wrench for the bolt.



I have a couple crescent wrenches, 6" and 12", to use to "hold" a bolt head while I'm turning the nut from the other side. I don't always have Two of the perfectly fitting wrench sizes, especially in Whitworth, and the adjustable wrench does well if you don't put too much torque on it, which you don't if you're just "holding" something in place.

At a little rural Virginia flea market this morning, I was rooting through a box of old tools, mostly cheap "Companion" or beat-up Chinese stuff, when I found a German-made "Gedore" brand open-end wrench in 3/4 Whitworth (7/8 BS). It had "Franz" and "F.S." engraved on it; the 90-year-old dude selling it wanted 4 dollars so it's now added to my Whitworth tool drawer. Also bought a nice high-quality small 2" clamp-on bench vise and a usable brass hammer, so a good morning!

Lannis


OK, I admit it, I'm addicted to brake fluid.

But I can stop any time I want.
#589083 - 03/07/15 2:31 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: Lannis]  
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quinten Online content
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Crescent is the US brand and US patent holder for their variation of an adjustable spanner . Patent date 1904 http://www.datamp.org/patents/advance.php?id=16605&set=19
Earlier types from 1857 here :
.

#589104 - 03/07/15 4:21 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: KennethC.]  
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Originally Posted By KennethC.
A while ago BeezaBryon posted this picture of a BSA factory tool kit.







That picture shows four "Birmingham screwdrivers"

#589105 - 03/07/15 4:34 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: Ger B]  
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ohio
They're called impact drivers here


When given the choice between two evils I picked the one I haven't tried before
#589114 - 03/07/15 5:29 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: Ger B]  
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Irish Swede Online content
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Elburn, Ill. USA
Alan. adjustable' wrenches are known as "knuckle-busters' and "bolt rounders"
here in Illinois, too.

The set of hammers, a chisel and "knuckle-buster", plus a coil of bailing wire, are
known as a Harley Tool Kit, here.

Oh, and I forgot! Add a twelve-pack of cheap beer.

#589229 - 03/08/15 12:59 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: Irish Swede]  
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Hillbilly bike Online content
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Running from demons in WNY
I worked as a construction electrician

Mash hammer


And this tool ,lineman's pliers ,is always called a Klein's



This is a water pump pliers



650 Triumph modified production LSR record holder 133.1 MPH... Twin 650 engine Triumph LSR that goes sorta fast...
#589243 - 03/08/15 1:50 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: Ger B]  
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Quote:
electrician

When the elec runs around with tools like that, the engineers get very nervous (on board of ships that is) ... laughing


Ger B

#589275 - 03/08/15 4:39 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: Ger B]  
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Hillbilly bike Online content
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Running from demons in WNY
Originally Posted By Ger B
Quote:
electrician

When the elec runs around with tools like that, the engineers get very nervous (on board of ships that is) ... laughing


Ships are a bit different than industrial or institutional buildings. grin 90 percent of the work is mechanical.
Do your ship electricians call the wiring junction box on an electric motor a " Peckerhead"?



650 Triumph modified production LSR record holder 133.1 MPH... Twin 650 engine Triumph LSR that goes sorta fast...
#589276 - 03/08/15 4:55 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: Hillbilly bike]  
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Ger B Offline
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A peckerhead... no. Ive sailed wíth Dutch, Malasian and Chinese elecs and in the offshore I met Kroatian elecs.
All very skilled in maintenance, fault finding and problem solving, but a peckerhead? No. A junction box or connection box I'm afraid.
First time I hear of a peckerhead. beerchug

PS... I did a Google search on peckerhead... Strange language, American English laughing


Ger B

#589292 - 03/08/15 6:11 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: Ger B]  
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ohio, usa
well, i once had ball cocks on my bike, but i replaced them because the pet cocks were more suitable to my gland nuts.


Into the distance a ribbon of black
Stretched to the point of no turning back
A flight of fancy on a windswept field
Standing alone my senses reeled
A fatal attraction is holding me fast how
How can I escape this irresistible grasp?
#589407 - 03/09/15 1:04 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: Ger B]  
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AngloBike Online content
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UK Berks
http://www.canford.co.uk/Products/55-991_EARTH-SPIKE-FITTING-TOOL

canford are an audio equipment supplier and like to bung odd jokes into their catalogue

Last edited by AngloBike; 03/09/15 1:04 pm.
#589426 - 03/09/15 2:27 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: AngloBike]  
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Hillbilly bike Online content
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Running from demons in WNY
Earth spike in the US is called a ground rod. Normally a solid steel rod 5/8 inch x 8 foot long .Driving it home with a hammer is time consuming, it flexs and vibrates if the soil isn't sandy and mushrooms the end and the wire clamp won't fit.. grin

Use this instead cool ...


650 Triumph modified production LSR record holder 133.1 MPH... Twin 650 engine Triumph LSR that goes sorta fast...
#589580 - 03/10/15 12:17 pm Re: Language question US English [Re: Hillbilly bike]  
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Irish Swede Online content
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Elburn, Ill. USA
Re: "Ground spike":

In the midwest, we drive steel fence posts into the ground using a "ram," which is a two-foot long heavy wall pipe with a thick steel cap welded on one end.
Slide the ram over the end of the rod or post, pound it down
with eight or ten slides of the ram, the job is done, and
the end of the post or rod isn't mushroomed.

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