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#509047 - 10/05/13 1:03 am Tool Obsession
Redmoggy Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/31/07
Posts: 1081
Loc: South Island
After reading about banks of red tool boxes on TV shows, i got currious, is anyone else obsessed by tools?

You see, many years ago, back when men were men and sheep ran scared. I got a saturday job with a guy building high end kit cars. I was only 15 and one thing made a huge impression on me. The big red Snap On tool box, filled with tools that worked. Not the crap people got me as thoughtfull pressents. I have been a poor man ever since!

Over 20 years later and i am quite proud to call this mine



I work in the motortrade so have to keep my tools at work, but one day they will be tucked in the corner of my shed where they belong.

So anyone else? Show us your tools?

Rod


Edited by Redmoggy (10/05/13 1:04 am)
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#509059 - 10/05/13 4:34 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Jersey Kev Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/09/06
Posts: 112
Loc: new jersey, usa
Better be careful asking a bunch of bikers to show you their tools.
_________________________
Jersey Kev

67 TR6P Saint
76 T140V Bonneville
95 Daytona 900
(removed non-brit from list)

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#509064 - 10/05/13 5:11 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Ger Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 09/23/05
Posts: 4426
Loc: Netherlands, Rotterdam area.
There is a city in this country with a district where you can go windowshopping for ladies who show their tools... grin

[click some of mine in the garage, not the ladies]

My garage is to small to wheel a rolling cabinet sized like a belltower around in.
The sockets and the torque wrench are in their boxes in a cabinet.
_________________________
Ger B
BSA A-65T 1971, nicknamed "De fiets" (the bicycle);
Triumph Trophy 900 1996, nicknamed "Dat andere ding" (that other thing).

http://www.mijnalbum.nl/Grotefoto-T4S7BCBJ.jpg
http://www.mijnalbum.nl/Grotefoto-Q4QIECV7.jpg

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#509083 - 10/05/13 9:11 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
M Shearer Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 07/08/06
Posts: 665
Loc: Perth. Wild West Downunder.
Wow Mog that is quite a stack! Can you see what's in the top without a ladder?
Quite a few years ago there was a thread about tools started by a member who has since left the forum. Can't remember his name now but he was obsessed with Garrington Kestrel tools. He had put together a very impressive collection of spanners. Some one might be able to provide a link if they can remember it.
_________________________
Mark F.
'52 ZB34 Gold Star.
'65 Lightning Rocket.
'74 Roadster Commando.
'85 VF1000R.

http://bmecwa.com/



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#509138 - 10/05/13 5:06 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Al Eckstadt Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 08/04/01
Posts: 749
Loc: Jordan, NY
Rod, Looks good. I have my tools in two smaller Snap-On boxes almost as old as me! I started looking for a new car repair shop when the owner bought a huge orange Snap-On box 1 1/2 times wider than the cars he works on and so tall you can't see over the top of it. The price of shop work went up immediately after. Al.
_________________________
Al Eckstadt
1969 Triumph Bonneville
1967 Triumph Mountain Cub
1967 Royal Enfield Interceptor Series 1A TT7
NEW YORK STATE BRIT/EURO/VINTAGE EVENTS CALENDAR AT:
www.bmccny.org

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#509140 - 10/05/13 5:13 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
shel Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/14/05
Posts: 2728
Loc: ohio
I work in the parts department of a GM dealer. Most of the mechanics have $5,000+ invested in their box and that doesn't include the tools.
I have a tool rule, if I have to borrow twice I probably need to buy my own.

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#509144 - 10/05/13 5:34 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Redmoggy Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/31/07
Posts: 1081
Loc: South Island

Shel, i have a similar rule. I also hate having to rout around for the 'workshop' tools. There always broke, dirty or hidden! Always better to roll my box to a job and know i have it all there. My latest addition was the middle riser box and i can just see in the top. I guess when thats full i will need to go sideways!

Rod
_________________________



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#509145 - 10/05/13 5:34 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
KC in S.B. Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 08/05/01
Posts: 2218
Loc: Santa Barbara, California
I was buying Snap On when I got started, it seemed like the thing to do. Then I realized that most the fellows in the shop were just making their monthly payment on the outstanding amount owed, and not leaving the truck with anything new, I thought that was odd. I got a severance once back in the 80's and my wife told me to get a good box. I bought a Repo from the S-On man, ....and parked it in a corner of the hangar for several years. I was kind of embarrassed by it. Now, 25 years later, it's little compared to what they sell now!! It's in my MC shop, and I use crap at work.... ;-)
BTW, is anyone else having their old Black handle screw drivers just crack and split while sitting in the box? I'm pissed, because they only sell these HUGE handled replacements, and I like the old ones. Just like the old VS and OEX wrenches.
_________________________
Buncha ole BSAs and Triumphs, some even run!

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#509152 - 10/05/13 6:38 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: KC in S.B.]
Alan_nc Offline


Registered: 08/05/01
Posts: 1459
Loc: Greensboro, NC
Here is my pride and joy in the tool area:

Family history says it's a late 1930ies Kennedy Tool & Die box





_________________________
Alan
Way to many bikes.

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#509155 - 10/05/13 6:56 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
HawaiianTiger Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 06/25/07
Posts: 3555
Loc: Maui Hawaii
Yeah, I'm obsessed with tools. Without tools, is a man anymore than a shaven monkey?

Recently, I took a few tools over to a man's house to strip his top end. I took enough to completely dismantle the engine if it needed it.
When I left, I forgot some of my tools. The man was kind enough to bring them back, or at least some of them. He didn't bring back my cam fitting/removal tools, my crank pinion puller, my clutch hub puller and some miscellaneous items.
I was depressed for a couple of months until one day I got a call from him that he found my tools in his garage.
I was elated. I jumped on the Flying Tiger and went right down there.

A couple of observations. I can't remember the last time I lost a tool. It just doesn't happen.

Second. I'm not so hot about my tools leaving the garage anymore.

A really close friend wanted to borrow one of my King Dick offset box end wrenches(beautiful works of art, they are.) the other day. I lent it to him stating that while my wrench is gone, I'm out of business as a mechanic.

I'm as worried as a mother hen when one of her chicks has gone astray.

I guess I am obsessed....

Cheers,
Bill
_________________________
Bikes
1974 Commando
1980 KZ550
1957 Thunderbird/T110 "Flying Tiger"
Fans: Loads of Emersons (Two six wingers)

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#509157 - 10/05/13 7:03 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: HawaiianTiger]
old mule Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/06/13
Posts: 209
Loc: Chihuahuan Desert
Back when, a friend was in Ulan Bator and bought me a beautiful set of Whitworth wrenchs from some Chinese soldiers at the weekend goat and produce market. The army there uses really nice hand tools, not the crap they export to us. Any lo9ts of their machinery is Whitworth.
Perfect fit, good plated forgings, nice and long box wrenches, used them 25 years now.

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#509167 - 10/05/13 8:11 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: old mule]
TR6Ray Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/01/10
Posts: 1657
Loc: Illinois, USA
Alan, that Kennedy box is very similar to the one I got as a machinist apprentice back in the early 1970's. The deal was, they issued us our boxes, full of the necessary tools. We made payments, deducted each week from our pay. If we stuck around and graduated from the apprenticeship, they refunded all our tool payments, and we kept the whole kit. They were good tools, Starrett mics, Mitutoyo indicator, etc. Some of them came in handy on my TR6 project. My Kennedy box is still in very nice condition.

Ray

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#509168 - 10/05/13 8:29 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
JubeePrince Offline
Life member

Registered: 11/18/05
Posts: 6085
Loc: Back on the mainland!
My dad has a similar Kennedy box. He got it from his father in- law, who was a machinist at Whitin Machine Works in Whitinsville, MA ., back in the 40's through the 60's .

Steve
_________________________
'77 T140J
"Vintage Bike". What's in your garage?

"The paying customer is always right."

Fitting round pegs into square holes since 1961...

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#509169 - 10/05/13 8:30 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Lannis Offline
Life member

Registered: 07/28/01
Posts: 8269
Loc: Old Pop in an Oak
I've heard very many people say (and I think we may have discussed it before) that it's much more efficient in the long run to have your shop tools organized on a pegboard, each in it's place, and in such a way that the most-used ones are closest to hand.

Of course, this wouldn't work in a big shop where several mechanics work, as the tools have to be locked up, but in a shop where you're the only guy working, does anyone find that it's better organization to hang the tools up in plain view over the workbenches and workstands?

Lannis
_________________________
"What's the plan?"

"Plan? There ain't no plan!"

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#509170 - 10/05/13 8:34 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: shel]
Lannis Offline
Life member

Registered: 07/28/01
Posts: 8269
Loc: Old Pop in an Oak
Originally Posted By: shel
I work in the parts department of a GM dealer. Most of the mechanics have $5,000+ invested in their box and that doesn't include the tools.
I have a tool rule, if I have to borrow twice I probably need to buy my own.


A local mechanic (our kids used to play together) in a 3-man do-everything car shop down the road from me once went bankrupt due to personal problems, and had to sell all of his tools, some at pawn-shop prices. He beat his problems and addictions, and went back into the car business full time with his partners.

To refit himself with all the hand tools he needed, including the Snap-On boxes, cost him just north of $90,000. This didn't include the big shop tools like diagnostic centers, welders, chargers, etc., just his hand tools ....

He was years paying for that. You can be sure he did NOT lend tools to no damn body ...

Lannis
_________________________
"What's the plan?"

"Plan? There ain't no plan!"

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#509183 - 10/05/13 10:01 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Lannis]
Gordon Gray Offline
Life member

Registered: 08/27/01
Posts: 3842
Loc: North Carolina
Originally Posted By: Lannis
I've heard very many people say (and I think we may have discussed it before) that it's much more efficient in the long run to have your shop tools organized on a pegboard, each in it's place, and in such a way that the most-used ones are closest to hand.

Of course, this wouldn't work in a big shop where several mechanics work, as the tools have to be locked up, but in a shop where you're the only guy working, does anyone find that it's better organization to hang the tools up in plain view over the workbenches and workstands?

Lannis


I'm lucky enough to be the only one that uses my tools...I don't have them hung up but I do put them back in the same place EVERY time so I know where they are when I need them.

More tools than skills.....Opie Gone Bad


Edited by Gordon Gray (10/05/13 11:06 pm)

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#509200 - 10/06/13 2:18 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Lannis]
DavidP Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 10/21/08
Posts: 3681
Loc: Gnashville
Originally Posted By: Lannis
I've heard very many people say (and I think we may have discussed it before) that it's much more efficient in the long run to have your shop tools organized on a pegboard, each in it's place, and in such a way that the most-used ones are closest to hand.
......in a shop where you're the only guy working, does anyone find that it's better organization to hang the tools up in plain view over the workbenches and workstands?

Lannis

My father organized his tools in that manner, pegboard on the walls and spring clips inside cabinets. It did make them easy to find and put back in place (he even drew outlines of each tool on the boards.)
However, he was not a mechanic, just Mr. Fix-it around the house.
Another cute trick, I think he picked it up from Popular Mechanics, was to mount mason jars to the bottom of shelves by the lids to store nuts and bolts.
I'm not really fond of that one, but I would probably use the pegboard trick IF I had a proper workshop. Being a renter, my big box sits in the corner of the kitchen. I have smaller tool chests for my electronics tools.
_________________________
A good friend will bail you out of jail.
A great friend will be in the cell with you saying, "Damn, that was fun!"

71 A65L

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#509204 - 10/06/13 4:24 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Peter R Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 11/08/09
Posts: 1076
Loc: Netherlands
it is reassuring for me to see that I am not the only one with a tool obsession. crazy

Over the years I bought a lot of tools, mostly high quality, and a lot of stuff from surplus of the army and airforce.
I prefer a pegboard over a rollingbox with drawers, so you notice immediately when something is missing.
It may look like overkill to some, but I have A/F, Withworth and metric spanners/sockets ec.

_________________________
Peter.
1974 Commando 850
1972 Trident T150T
1961 Goldie DBD34
1969 Benelli 250 sport special

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#509207 - 10/06/13 5:06 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Ger Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 09/23/05
Posts: 4426
Loc: Netherlands, Rotterdam area.
We all talk about wrenches and spanners, but nobody mentions air compressors and a fire extiguisher.
I've got a small air compressor with an air tank, and
maybe it's my past in engine rooms of ships but I'm happy
with a fire extinguisher (AFFF) immediately around the door of the garage.
I trust I'll never have to use it.
_________________________
Ger B
BSA A-65T 1971, nicknamed "De fiets" (the bicycle);
Triumph Trophy 900 1996, nicknamed "Dat andere ding" (that other thing).

http://www.mijnalbum.nl/Grotefoto-T4S7BCBJ.jpg
http://www.mijnalbum.nl/Grotefoto-Q4QIECV7.jpg

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#509208 - 10/06/13 5:14 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
J in KC Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 08/09/01
Posts: 907
Loc: Kansas City, USA
A test for the truly obsessed.



Who can name what each of these tools are for? (all britbike related)

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#509212 - 10/06/13 5:43 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: J in KC]
Peter R Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 11/08/09
Posts: 1076
Loc: Netherlands
I recognize the Commando clutch spring tool, the slide hammer for rocker spindles/ignition and Triumph clutch hub extractor.
Correct?
_________________________
Peter.
1974 Commando 850
1972 Trident T150T
1961 Goldie DBD34
1969 Benelli 250 sport special

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#509216 - 10/06/13 6:00 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Peter R]
J in KC Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 08/09/01
Posts: 907
Loc: Kansas City, USA
Yeah, you got some of them.

BTW, quite a nice workbench set up.

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#509217 - 10/06/13 6:06 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Ob1quixote Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 09/09/07
Posts: 1377
Loc: Charleston SC
I cant afford to be obsessed.

But I do keep a box in the garage, a box at the body shop, a big kit in the RV, kit in PU and micro kit on the DS bike.

Managed to do any and all work for years {except transmission} in my many vehicles until this year, when I let a sop do some work on my wife's minivan, out of convenience.

It wasnt convenient, and my opinion that I would make more money working P&B than replacing the power steering pump myself was wrong. It only took 3 visits and almost 2 weeks down time...

I put plugs in my 5.4L Ford a few weeks ago, lesson learned.

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#509222 - 10/06/13 8:03 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
GaCracker Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/17/07
Posts: 1447
Loc: Johns Creek,Ga
I don't think I own anything that means more to me than my dad's old tool chest. For nearly 40 years, he worked as a fleet mechanic for a trucking company that hauled new GM cars to dealers. Early 50s vintage Cornwell bottom chest and top box. Middle chest is Mac. Besides being crammed with tools, it is a time capsule of his working life. Many personal items like eyeglasses, pocket knives, nail clippers, and union cards from 1953. I use the tools, but keep everything just as he left them. Many of the tools are specific to truck maintenance, and are large in scale. I did a front brake job on the wife's car Friday, and used those big Channel Locks to push the caliper piston back into the bore. I was given the Kennedy box by an uncle who was a fleet mechanic for the phone company. Greg





Edited by GaCracker (10/06/13 8:38 am)
_________________________
72 TR6RV
2004 Thruxton

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#509224 - 10/06/13 8:46 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Adrian1 Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 06/24/13
Posts: 345
Loc: Australia
Redmoggy, you've a ways to go before you catch this bloke! laughing

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SNAP-TOOLS-LAR...=item43a7521780

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#509229 - 10/06/13 9:46 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Richrd Offline


Registered: 08/18/01
Posts: 2112
Loc: Springfield Nebraska
damm Alan, I just gave away that same kennedy box. it was just taking up room.
_________________________
Rich (member ThreeMustGetBeers)
"I love the smell of two stroke in the morning. It's the smell of victory"

69 bonney
72 commando
75 commando interstate
06 Suzu..Suzu.. uh appliance
couple of beesas a ducati
and the Snake Bike

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#509231 - 10/06/13 9:50 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: GaCracker]
Gordon Gray Offline
Life member

Registered: 08/27/01
Posts: 3842
Loc: North Carolina
Originally Posted By: GaCracker
I don't think I own anything that means more to me than my dad's old tool chest. <snip>


Greg.....that's priceless bigt

Opie Gone Bad

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#509235 - 10/06/13 10:00 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Gordon Gray]
GaCracker Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/17/07
Posts: 1447
Loc: Johns Creek,Ga
I appreciate that, Gordon. Don't want to overstate it, but I literally feel his presence whenever I open those drawers. Greg
_________________________
72 TR6RV
2004 Thruxton

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#509259 - 10/06/13 12:01 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: GaCracker]
Gordon Gray Offline
Life member

Registered: 08/27/01
Posts: 3842
Loc: North Carolina
Wonder how many people on here know that your avatar is a photo of your father???? It and how much his tools mean to you show how much you cared for him.....and his memory. Priceless I tell ya bigt

Your cracker friend in Mayberry, NC Opie Gone Bad

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#509328 - 10/06/13 9:47 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Adrian1]
TR6Ray Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/01/10
Posts: 1657
Loc: Illinois, USA
Originally Posted By: Adrian1
Redmoggy, you've a ways to go before you catch this bloke! laughing

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SNAP-TOOLS-LAR...=item43a7521780
Wow, Adrian! I would try to be high bidder on that except for two reasons --
  • I don't have enough money.
  • If I won the auction, I would have to park my bikes outside to make room for all the tools.

Originally Posted By: GaCracker
I appreciate that, Gordon. Don't want to overstate it, but I literally feel his presence whenever I open those drawers. Greg

Gordon & Greg, I'm glad to see I'm not the only one who feels that way about tools handed down through the family. I respect that very much. I have some like that and feel the same way. Now that I'm as old as I am, I feel like I've handed down some of these tools to myself, if that's possible!

Ray

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#509336 - 10/07/13 12:21 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: TR6Ray]
Semper Gumby Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 02/12/07
Posts: 1670
Loc: Atlanta, GA USA
I want the tool that aligns the clutch chainwheel with the front primary sprocket. Irrational I know but that is my "obsession".

and a shop instead of a shed.

and a real lift with a cutout for the rear wheel.

and a compressor.

and a bead blaster.

and airconditioning in the summer and heat in the winter.
_________________________
Solid lifters save lives.

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#509350 - 10/07/13 4:28 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Redmoggy Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/31/07
Posts: 1081
Loc: South Island
I do have a vintage Whitworth Snap On spanner, my Grandad gave me. Never had a use for it till i got the TR6. Now he is gone i really do think of him whenever i spin it.

Rod


Edited by Redmoggy (10/07/13 5:13 am)
_________________________



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#509362 - 10/07/13 7:43 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Semper Gumby Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 02/12/07
Posts: 1670
Loc: Atlanta, GA USA
...and a 450 watt alternator...
_________________________
Solid lifters save lives.

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#509367 - 10/07/13 8:06 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
ricochetrider Offline
Private sponsor

Registered: 05/13/07
Posts: 7249
Loc: Pennsyltuckey
Oh, you can say I'm obssessed with tools. To the point of geek-dom.

30 + years in the construction and carpentry biz has me with a pretty big pile of hand and power tools. Tho I don't do too much carpentry any more, I'm still buying tools! My recent purchases include my first ever sawzall and two now batteries for my Makita 14.4V drill.

My current trade in the Entertainment Industry finds me with a whole other pile of different tools, many of which could easily cross over as "toys"- I use carabiners, ropes, sheaves, and such gak as would be found in any avid rock climber's gear kit.

These days, my "regular" tool needs are fluid. By & large, I use the stagework tools I carry in my car. None of my stuff is as organised as some of the photos I see posted here. In all my life, I've never had any one spot such as a shop or garage where all my stuff lays out all neatly arrayed.


Attachments
image.jpg

Description: Here is my daily use pile of tools used in my current profession. Anything from wrenches, ratchets, hammers... To climbing harness and gear. Lots of my tools have tethers on, so they remain clipped to me and cannot fall when I'm working overhead.

image.jpg

Description: Here are my stagehand tools packed into my rolling office/shop




Edited by ricochetrider (10/07/13 8:09 am)
_________________________
"my country is the world...and my religion is to do good."
Thomas Payne

"clap your hands if you feel that happiness is the truth"
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#509370 - 10/07/13 8:46 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Ger]
Lannis Offline
Life member

Registered: 07/28/01
Posts: 8269
Loc: Old Pop in an Oak
Originally Posted By: Ger
We all talk about wrenches and spanners, but nobody mentions air compressors and a fire extiguisher.
I've got a small air compressor with an air tank, and
maybe it's my past in engine rooms of ships but I'm happy
with a fire extinguisher (AFFF) immediately around the door of the garage.
I trust I'll never have to use it.


Fay bought me a big dual-cylinder air compressor for my birthday one year. One of the most useful tools in ANY shop.

And yes, there are two fire extinguishers easy to hand ....

Lannis
_________________________
"What's the plan?"

"Plan? There ain't no plan!"

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#509407 - 10/07/13 11:55 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Lannis]
Alan_nc Offline


Registered: 08/05/01
Posts: 1459
Loc: Greensboro, NC
Ditto with the fire extinguisher(s)

Have a fairly small air compressor that is on wheels which is handy. I dream of a real big one so that I can do sand blasting.

I have a nice motorcycle jack but do not have a lift which would be a help in some cases.

Since I transport bikes almost daily I have a real nice folding aluminum ramp and a step stool to load and unload my pickup.
_________________________
Alan
Way to many bikes.

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#509413 - 10/07/13 12:21 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
shel Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/14/05
Posts: 2728
Loc: ohio
A couple months ago I had a helmet fall off its hook and land on a fire extinguisher sitting on my bench, shearing the pull pin and the extinguisher fell over, landing on the handle and discharged all over the garage.
I walked in the next morning to grab a tool I had borrowed from work never turning on the lights, as I was walking to my truck I noticed the white powder on the tool as soon as i turned the lights I realized what happened.
Man what a mess that was.

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#509424 - 10/07/13 1:08 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: shel]
Peter R Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 11/08/09
Posts: 1076
Loc: Netherlands
Powder fire extinguishers create an enormous mess indeed, the powder containes a salt that is very corrosive, that is why I have an AFFF foam type of extinguisher in my workshop.
Fortunately I never needed it.

Welding equipment is the greatest risk in my experience, I had a small fire in my workshop once, when sparks from welding ignited a rag of cloth that was on the floor.
Could put it out before worse things happened.


Edited by Peter R (10/08/13 3:56 am)
_________________________
Peter.
1974 Commando 850
1972 Trident T150T
1961 Goldie DBD34
1969 Benelli 250 sport special

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#509426 - 10/07/13 1:18 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Ger Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 09/23/05
Posts: 4426
Loc: Netherlands, Rotterdam area.
Quote:
Could put it out before worse things happened

Why do small ducks have small feet? To extinguish small fires.
Why do elefants have big feet? To extinguish small ducks... sick

Powder fire extinguishers ruin everything electric,
even around the corner where there has never been a fire.

I've trained for an offshore safety certificate, with water, AFFF, powder and CO2.
We had to walk blind folded in a smoke filled training building
with air breathing aparatus on my back the cracking noise of fire from loudspeakers and sweat running from every pore of my skin...
_________________________
Ger B
BSA A-65T 1971, nicknamed "De fiets" (the bicycle);
Triumph Trophy 900 1996, nicknamed "Dat andere ding" (that other thing).

http://www.mijnalbum.nl/Grotefoto-T4S7BCBJ.jpg
http://www.mijnalbum.nl/Grotefoto-Q4QIECV7.jpg

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#509469 - 10/07/13 6:08 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Phil in Germany Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 08/26/01
Posts: 169
Loc: Duesseldorf/Germany
I've had my share of powder extinguisher experience many years ago when I partly set a car on fire whilst welding. I coughed for weeks and it took ages to get rid of the powder. Therefore I do have a fire extinguisher of the carbondioxide type in the shop.

I do sincerely hope I'll never need one again.

Best regards

Phil



Edited by Phil in Germany (10/07/13 6:10 pm)
_________________________
Best regards
Phil
Duesseldorf/Germany
'69 A 65 Lightning
'62 A 65 Star (disassembled)
'84 Yamaha SR 500

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#509475 - 10/07/13 6:59 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Phil in Germany]
Alan_nc Offline


Registered: 08/05/01
Posts: 1459
Loc: Greensboro, NC
My fire extinguishers are there thanks to a Triumph 500 (well really it's AMAL). The AMAL leaked and the bike backfired. Luckily I had it out in the drive and not in the garage. Could have grilled several hot dogs on that one.
_________________________
Alan
Way to many bikes.

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#509489 - 10/07/13 8:10 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Peter R]
shel Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/14/05
Posts: 2728
Loc: ohio
Originally Posted By: Peter R
Powder fire extinguishers create an enormous mess indeed, the powder containes a salt that is very corrosive


I noticed that, fortunately my bikes were not in the path of the discharge and only got a light dusting. As soon as I got home from work I pushed them out in the drive and washed them.
The next day when I got home I started cleaning up the rest of the mess. The lid on my tool box of open and all the sockets, ratchets and what nots had already began to rust. I spent a good couple hours cleaning them up fine steel wool and WD40.

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#509510 - 10/07/13 10:26 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: shel]
Phil R Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 08/04/01
Posts: 65
Loc: San Diego, Calif.
Originally Posted By: shel
[quote=Peter R]Powder fire extinguishers create an enormous mess indeed, the powder containes a salt that is very corrosive


Thankfully I've never needed to resort to using one in my garage. After reading shel's post I think I'll also invest in the CO2 type.....just in case.

Below is my main BritBike tool box, it's a motely assortment of various brands of SAE, Metric & of course Whitworth. Those tools laying in front of the box are some of the "home brewed" specialty tools geared specifically to the BritBike experience. I have various Brands represented here ie: Craftsman, Proto, Britool, Hazet & Dowidat. I think the only actual complete sets of anything are the Koken sockets and a set of Stahlwille Whitworth wrenches I inherited from my Brother-in-Law. I like the Kokens a lot & the Stahlwille wrenches appear to be very well made although I don't know much about the Company. What may look like a common piece of angle iron in the "specialty" tool area is in reality a highly refined & finely crafted clutch wheel holding tool! grin


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#509522 - 10/08/13 12:56 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
dave - NV Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 08/01/01
Posts: 1495
Loc: Elko, Nevada USA
"He who dies with the most tools wins"
unknown...
_________________________
dave - NV

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#509531 - 10/08/13 5:09 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: dave - NV]
Pete C Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 09/24/01
Posts: 299
Loc: Germany
The workshop is getting to be bigger than the house! crazy

Here's the essentials...and there is a fire extinguisher and a compressor hidden somewhere

Cheers
Pete






_________________________
Cheers
Pete

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#509536 - 10/08/13 7:40 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Pete C]
Peter R Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 11/08/09
Posts: 1076
Loc: Netherlands
Very well equipped workshop Pete, that Myford lathe is cool.
I have a small lathe,I can cut screw thread on it, but I sometimes wish I bought a larger one, butI still think that it was a good buy anyway.
Every classic bike owner/restorer should have a lathe.
Once you have one, you can not immagine that you could ever live without one.
_________________________
Peter.
1974 Commando 850
1972 Trident T150T
1961 Goldie DBD34
1969 Benelli 250 sport special

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#509568 - 10/08/13 12:11 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Peter R]
Phil R Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 08/04/01
Posts: 65
Loc: San Diego, Calif.
Nice wheel turning setup as well Pete. It's rare to find a lathe (even a gap bed) with that much clearance past the lead screw!

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#509571 - 10/08/13 12:24 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Peter R]
Allan Gill Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/03/13
Posts: 1973
Loc: Cheshire (UK)
Originally Posted By: Peter R

Once you have one, you can not imagine that you could ever live without one.


Not got a clue how to use one, nor do I own one, but my goodness I wish I did - life would be simpler!
_________________________
Allan aka Gilligan aka Young John aka "Him off startrek"

Writing rubbish for your pleasure

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#509573 - 10/08/13 12:59 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Allan Gill]
Peter R Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 11/08/09
Posts: 1076
Loc: Netherlands
[quote=Allan

Not got a clue how to use one, nor do I own one, but my goodness I wish I did - life would be simpler! [/quote]

There are several good books available to teach you the basics of working on a lathe.
I can recommand the book "the amateur's lathe", by L.H.Sparey.
You will find that it is not very hard to learn, and it is fun too.
You can start with simple things like spacers, and progress to more complicated things later on.
I made several special pullers, and adapters for carburators etc. There is no rocket science involved in working on a lathe.


Edited by Peter R (10/08/13 1:18 pm)
Edit Reason: spelling
_________________________
Peter.
1974 Commando 850
1972 Trident T150T
1961 Goldie DBD34
1969 Benelli 250 sport special

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#509654 - 10/08/13 10:21 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Zimm Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 08/04/01
Posts: 188
Loc: Kent Island, MD


This is what happens when you start using a metal lathe. Rough finished, but serviceable tools for replacing rear suspension bushings on 240 Volvos.

Don't see how people get along without one.


Edited by Zimm (10/08/13 10:21 pm)

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#509667 - 10/09/13 1:20 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Ger Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 09/23/05
Posts: 4426
Loc: Netherlands, Rotterdam area.
Quote:
Don't see how people get along without one

I would like to have a lathe. I think I will remember how to
use one, though the last time was on board of a ship more than 30 years ago.
Than I think: how often will I use it. I had a lathe job
done some weeks ago, for 20 Euro's. Job before that was five
years ago, next job who knows when?
Waste of money... for me that is... but so are old motorcycles... wink
_________________________
Ger B
BSA A-65T 1971, nicknamed "De fiets" (the bicycle);
Triumph Trophy 900 1996, nicknamed "Dat andere ding" (that other thing).

http://www.mijnalbum.nl/Grotefoto-T4S7BCBJ.jpg
http://www.mijnalbum.nl/Grotefoto-Q4QIECV7.jpg

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#509689 - 10/09/13 6:01 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Ger]
Pete C Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 09/24/01
Posts: 299
Loc: Germany
I know what you mean Ger. I never needed a lathe until I got one a couple of years ago, but now I appreciate how much easier so many things are.
From drilling and tapping a hole or making nuts and bolts to making up bushes etc, it all gets transferred to the lathe now, and any spacers etc. can be made up in a few minutes (usually from scrap) instead of having to order them and pay more in postage than for the part itself.
Apart from that, there is the satisfaction of doing a job yourself mixed with the excitement of never knowing when you are going to screw up and be left with a bloody stump instead of a full set of fingers. cry

Cheers
Pete
_________________________
Cheers
Pete

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#509700 - 10/09/13 7:23 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Peter R]
Allan Gill Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/03/13
Posts: 1973
Loc: Cheshire (UK)
Originally Posted By: Peter R


There are several good books available to teach you the basics of working on a lathe.
I can recommand the book "the amateur's lathe", by L.H.Sparey.


On order now! I have the ability to kit out a 6' by 8' shed for use as a workshop. Its full of junk, spare bike and other spares at the moment. I will look at putting a lathe on the long side of the shed. What sort of size lathe would I need for making tools, spacers, bolts etc etc. Longest item I can think of making is a rear brake rod.
_________________________
Allan aka Gilligan aka Young John aka "Him off startrek"

Writing rubbish for your pleasure

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#509710 - 10/09/13 9:06 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Allan Gill]
Pete C Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 09/24/01
Posts: 299
Loc: Germany
I only have limited experience with lathes but I reckon if you can find a decent second Hand Myford ML7 or Super 7 you will be able to do most, if not all, of what you want to do.

You can get the speciifications here
http://www.myford.co.uk/

and this Forum will get you loads of Information
http://www.model-engineer.co.uk/forums/

and this chap has some useful advice for beginners
http://start-model-engineering.co.uk/begin-with-bogs/begin-with-bogs/preparing-your-mini-lathe/

I spent around a year reading and researching before I decided on what I actually needed to buy. The general opinion seems to be to get a good used machine rather than one of the cheap Chinese small lathes that seem to be everywhere at the moment. These may be OK to start with but you will probably want to do more and more accurate work as you gain experience and then you will need a better quality machine.

There will also be other bits and pieces you will want. Look here for making your Xmas present list-
http://www.lathespares.co.uk/

A coffee machine in the shed is a good idea as well...you will be spending a lot of time there once the bug bites! laughing

Cheers

Pete
_________________________
Cheers
Pete

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#509717 - 10/09/13 9:25 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Allan Gill Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/03/13
Posts: 1973
Loc: Cheshire (UK)
I found this very early ML7 Myford on eBay. search item number: 190922877636 (the link etc didn't work, and it stretched the page)

It looks like a beautiful piece of kit.

I'm not a fan of chinese made tooling, as you say the accuracy is somewhat lacking. I'll keep an eye out for something decent, and then make plans towards a milling machine.

I don't think there is anything more gratifying than saying "I made this!"

(sorry for the extra wide screen, the "link to webpage" option isn't working as it normally does


Edited by Allan Gill (10/09/13 12:19 pm)
_________________________
Allan aka Gilligan aka Young John aka "Him off startrek"

Writing rubbish for your pleasure

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#509719 - 10/09/13 9:41 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Allan Gill]
Pete C Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 09/24/01
Posts: 299
Loc: Germany
Don't forget you will feed to put whatever you buy on a VERY solid support that is not going to give under the weight (so preferably concrete floor and steel bench construction. Setting up the lathe so that the bed is straight and Level with no twists can be time consuming and you don't want to have to do it repeatedly.
Myford started making "Hobby" lathes after the war and have a good reputation for quality products that last, if looked after, so age should not be too much of a concern.

Cheers
Pete


Edited by Pete C (10/09/13 9:44 am)
_________________________
Cheers
Pete

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#509721 - 10/09/13 9:49 am Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
John Healy Online   content


Registered: 03/24/05
Posts: 8572
Loc: Boston, Massachusetts
Good stuff, can I add:
The use of a lathe, or any metal cutting device, starts with the understanding of "speed and feed". When I was taught the basic understanding of these tenants I was instructed using a file and hack saw. We were not allowed near any powered machines until we could prove that we had the skill to select the correct file or hack saw blade for the job we were doing and produce workmanship product with these tools.

Following gaining experience in the basics of speed and feed one should garner a basic understanding of the use of the various cutting tools. There are two basic cutting materials used in the hobby shop: tool steel and carbide. There is a place for both, but there use is NOT universal.

While I was taught in an era where we had to grind our own tools, today one can buy a proper cutting tool off the shelf. Always buy the best cutting tools you can afford. Good tools make you look like you know what you are doing. There are some basic rules to learn about setting up the tool in the lathe, but this is well documented and easily understood.

Your success with the home workshop lathe will be dependent upon your understanding of the metal you are cutting, the tool you are using to cut it with, and the feed and speed you choose to use. For example, carbide tools like to be used for heavy cuts where the chip coming off the work is turning blue. If your lathe does not have the power to make these kind of cuts you would be better off using tools steel tooling and slower speeds.
_________________________
"Don't just teach your children to read. Teach them to question what they read." George Carlin

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#509736 - 10/09/13 12:01 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: John Healy]
Phil R Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 08/04/01
Posts: 65
Loc: San Diego, Calif.
All that John says above is true. I have found that my 1952 Sheldon lathe works best for me when I use high speed steel cutters as opposed to carbide, but YMMV. As with anything, the more you use a lathe the more uses you find for it. In the U.S. probably the most common garage size lathe is a 9 or 10 inch swing South Bend. These were used extensively in vocational schools. They can be somewhat beat up from student use, but the wear on the bed (ways) is usually minimal due to non-factory usage. With regard to Chinese lathes, I would not be too afraid to go with one of the sizes similar to that of the aforementioned South Bend machines. They are often offered with a lot of accessory items that are missing on older machines and are capable of decent work, especially if you are just learning. The more tooling you can get with any machine......the better! Most garage lathes don't get used everyday, but if you're a tool guy, you'll not mind having the options a lathe can provide.

Finally, apologies to Rod for straying from his original general tools subject to a lathe specific one.

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#509738 - 10/09/13 12:15 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Allan Gill Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/03/13
Posts: 1973
Loc: Cheshire (UK)
Apologies to Rod too.

I have to say my current too collection is a little embarrassing, my specialist tools, pullers, dial gauges etc get kept in a safe place which is simply stack and store type boxes. I have numerous tool boxes, I even bought a small tool kit for Jan a few years ago (a far better screw driver set than I own) and a few other things I have given her (I like to keep the belief that if you wish to own a vintage bike - you must be able to look after it. So some sockets etc are now her bike tools. However... I am recently known to use this box and start storing carburettor spares in there also. All my tool boxes need a real good tidy out, or preferably a decent bench where I can keep things in draws.
_________________________
Allan aka Gilligan aka Young John aka "Him off startrek"

Writing rubbish for your pleasure

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#509747 - 10/09/13 1:20 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Ger Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 09/23/05
Posts: 4426
Loc: Netherlands, Rotterdam area.
Quote:
We were not allowed near any powered machines until we could prove that we had the skill to select the correct file or hack saw blade for the job we were doing and produce workmanship product with these tools.

Sounds like you atended a Dutch marine engineers school in the 19sixties, John. laughing
_________________________
Ger B
BSA A-65T 1971, nicknamed "De fiets" (the bicycle);
Triumph Trophy 900 1996, nicknamed "Dat andere ding" (that other thing).

http://www.mijnalbum.nl/Grotefoto-T4S7BCBJ.jpg
http://www.mijnalbum.nl/Grotefoto-Q4QIECV7.jpg

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#509995 - 10/11/13 8:59 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Redmoggy Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/31/07
Posts: 1081
Loc: South Island

No Lathe for me I'm afraid, i do have a compressor, blast cabinet, parts wash and a couple of fire extinguishers though. For tools though things are a little sad.



The shadow board came with the garage, most important tool is bottom left.

Rod
_________________________



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#510000 - 10/11/13 9:26 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Rickman Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 02/10/03
Posts: 2533
Loc: Ohio
What,
The brick wall, or the electrical outlet???

No lathe [ Ooohh, how I wish ], but I have managed to obtain a V-mill....

Only a couple home made tools.... Not really well made, and of VERY limited use...


Edited by Rickman (10/11/13 9:32 pm)

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#510005 - 10/11/13 9:52 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Redmoggy Offline
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 05/31/07
Posts: 1081
Loc: South Island

...of the tool board!

Rod
_________________________



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#510065 - 10/12/13 12:04 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
Al Eckstadt Online   content
BritBike Forum member

Registered: 08/04/01
Posts: 749
Loc: Jordan, NY
"most important tool is bottom left"

Vice grips?
Or is the black thing far left a credit card? Charge it!
_________________________
Al Eckstadt
1969 Triumph Bonneville
1967 Triumph Mountain Cub
1967 Royal Enfield Interceptor Series 1A TT7
NEW YORK STATE BRIT/EURO/VINTAGE EVENTS CALENDAR AT:
www.bmccny.org

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#510105 - 10/12/13 6:59 pm Re: Tool Obsession [Re: Redmoggy]
breeze1954 Offline
Private sponsor

Registered: 08/30/06
Posts: 592
Loc: S.W. Pa.
A bottle opener, right? bigt

beerchug
_________________________
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Ride Safe When You Can; Tim

Small print Disclaimer: I am not responsible for spelling, grammar or political correctness. Actually Im not very responsible at all!

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