BritBike Forum logo
BritBike Sponsor BritBike Sponsor
BritBike Sponsor BritBike Sponsor
BritBike Sponsor BritBike Sponsor
BritBike Sponsor BritBike Sponsor
The Bonneville Shop BritBike Sponsor
Home | Sponsors, Newsletter | Regalia | Calendar | Bike Project | BritBike Museum
| Spiders Cartoons, | DVD- Manuals & Parts books
Upgrade to: Premium Membership | Premium Life Membership | Vendor Membership | Site Sponsor Membership
ShoutChat Box
Buy BritBike staff a coffee
Buy BritBike's staff a coffeeStill here since 1996 serving BritBike enthusiasts..
Search eBay for motorcycle parts in following countries
Australia, Canada, France, Holland, Italy, United Kingdom, USA
Random Gallery photo
Member Spotlight
BeezaBryan
BeezaBryan
Derbyshire UK
Posts: 3,185
Joined: April 2006
Show All Member Profiles 
Newest Members
Motoplane33, Loop, Filthy pup, Kevin Victor, Soupdragon
10739 Registered Users
Top Posters(30 Days)
franko 121
reverb 53
DavidP 51
Rohan 48
Popular Topics(Views)
925,085 mail-order LSR
Forum Statistics
Forums34
Topics67,180
Posts673,283
Members10,739
Most Online14,755
May 5th, 2019
Who's Online Now
68 registered members (998John), 464 guests, and 835 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Rate Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3
'66 Lightning project #395223
09/20/11 4:21 am
09/20/11 4:21 am
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 24
Farmington, Newer Mexico
O
officerleroy Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
officerleroy  Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
O

Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 24
Farmington, Newer Mexico
This might belong in the "projects" forum but oh well.

Here is what I was able to fit in the back of my xterra:
[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Those are the pieces of a 1966 BSA Lightning in my garage. It's a good feeling.
[Linked Image]
The frame has been painted with a thick tractor paint. It looks good from far, but I think I'm leaning towards getting it powder coated.
[Linked Image]
These next few pictures are what sealed the deal for me on getting this bike, the bottom end work done by ACME in Fort Collins, CO:
[Linked Image]
Is the rust/discoloration on the crank anything to be concerned with? The rebuild was done a couple years ago and it looks like it's been sitting dry.
[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
This is to kind of give my workspace a scale. I couldn't be happier with what i've got to work with. If needed i could even spill over to the other half of the garage and push the wife's car outside. [Linked Image]

Now for the story:

I came across the ad on advrider last week, it was also posted on this forum BTW, and it appealed to too many of my senses to say no to. This is my first restoration, refurbishing will probably be more accurate, but I'm hoping my enthusiasm will make up for my lack of experience. Here's my initial thoughts:

-I was excited to see it all taken apart and ready to be put back together. I'm realizing now though that I wish I had been the one taking it apart so I could have seen how it should look when put back together. But everything seems pretty well sorted and I have the original shop manual and the Kim CD and haynes manual on the way.

-I need to figure out some way of prioritzing what just gets cleaned/refurbished and what I want to replace with "new" stuff. I think that the engine and tank are the most standout pieces as far as looks go so that is probably where my biggest chunk of my "cosmetic" budget will go. A chromed tank comes to mind but short searching shows those are in the 600 price range!?!? Probably will just get her running first and then do cosmetic upgrades gradually.

-I'm wanting to build a reliable rider that looks good. I have little concern with historical accuracy, but cosmetically at least would like to to remain true to the original. I'm not looking to cafe this thing at all other than some lower clubman bars. Included was a machined oil filter bracket by ACME that I'll have to post a picture of. I'm also considering getting an electrical system from Boyer Bransden. Are there any other modifications I should be looking at as far as making it more reliable?

-My first step was to get it home and figure out what manuals I needed. That box is checked and now I'm wondering what the process should be, it's a little daunting looking at boxes full of what looks like random bolts and pieces. I'm thinking send the frame and other bits off to powder coated. Then have the top end redone. Next I'll handle the suspension and wheels. With the frame back I'll assemble and mount the engine. Next I guess would be all the cables and hoses. I'd finish with the seat, tank and finally the electrics. The powder coating and top end cost money though, so right now I'm really just trying to figure out what I can do that only costs me my time. Suggestions would be GREATLY appreciated. And yes, I'll be using the forum search extensively.

Thanks in advance for any recommendations. I'm really excited about this and can't wait to make some progress, and post pictures of course!


Support Your #1 BritBike Forum!

Check out British motorcycles for sale:
British Motorcycles on e-Bay UK, British motorcycles on e-Bay North America


Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: officerleroy] #395283
09/20/11 3:47 pm
09/20/11 3:47 pm
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 211
Ipswich England
wbabojo Offline
BritBike Forum member
wbabojo  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 211
Ipswich England
First of all, don't throw anything away. However ridiculous, some "Mods" were there for a reason, if only to warn you of a deeper hidden problem. Works manual. By this I mean a BSA one or any with the correct wear limits on valve springs and crank sizes etc. Ok, I see you've done that?
Secondly, clean engine parts in kerosene. As your cleaning them, look and measure for wear/damage. Make a list of what needs replacing. This shouldn't cost you much.
Do you have access to Whitworth tools?


Gavin
You can't make a silk purse from a sow's ear.
Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: ] #395284
09/20/11 3:59 pm
09/20/11 3:59 pm
Joined: Feb 2003
Posts: 2,818
Ohio
R
Rickman Offline
BritBike Forum member
Rickman  Offline
BritBike Forum member
R

Joined: Feb 2003
Posts: 2,818
Ohio
Well,
This will take more time, but I will suggest, that you do a trial assembly of all your parts, before you send anything off to the powder coaters.

This will allow you an additional time sorting out your unfamiliar-to-you bike build process, checking fittings and fitment before you scratch and ding your new powder coat, and isolate what doesn't fit your bike.

I am curious about the upside down brake backing plate, with shoes, in the lower left bottom of your second pic... I see another front wheel, with backing plate, in the upper right of the same pic... I'm wondering which set of forks you do happen to have....

Yes, it might mean you will spend a bit more initially than you wanted to get started, but if the tapered roller bearings aren't already set-up and in the frame, or on the triple tree, you might want to think about that upgrade...

Before you send anything to the coaters, try to remove all of the grease, or as much as you can, from anywhere on any piece you want powdered.
Especially the gooseneck area.
If you leave the races in the frame, prepare to remove the powder, or install new races, once you get the frame back.

Since I hear that powder heat process' get quite high [ 800 degrees F??? ], you might consider removing the swing arm, if it has the rubber silent block bushings? Or, were they deleted by then?
I've got some swing arms, that have the rubber in them, and I am worried about this myself, I have frames getting ready for the powder place myself...

If you haven't heard, or read, about these bikes, many thread forms are not standard 'American' pitches, I'll suggest getting a thread gauge...
You are talking about a bike that is 45 years old, how many times has someone managed to substitute something that isn't correct? Yes, I read you aren't going for concours, but a rider. Too many times I've stripped a nut or bolt, thinking the threads were right, and they sure were not!

Eventually, _IF_ you catch the 'bug' as badly as most of us have, you may want to get a set of taps and dies, so you can chase the threads to clean them of various swarf and dings they gets...
Brett

Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: officerleroy] #395314
09/20/11 7:22 pm
09/20/11 7:22 pm
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 151
Greensboro NC
H
holdfastgreg Offline
BritBike Forum member
holdfastgreg  Offline
BritBike Forum member
H

Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 151
Greensboro NC
First off, I'm a young guy as well and mostly new to Brit bikes in comparison to some of the other blokes on this site. Don't hesitate to ask questions around this board. A lot of people are willing to send pictures of how their bike is setup or what things look like. Check out Engligh 101 and English 102 dvds, not going to lie Wes @ Four Aces and Lowbrow did an alright job on it. Good tricks and tips.

Second, read and reread your manuals. This will help you out assembling the bike and getting a feel for things. Take your time as most problems on this bike come from rushing or not taking care.

Third, buy new AMAL carbs. It'll be the best $300 or so you've ever spent. No more sticky slides, loosely fitted parts. The carbs are every bit worth the money. I'm not promising anything, but they will help you test and tune.

and last but not least, thanks for buying the project before me. I didn't need any more A65 stuff.

Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: officerleroy] #395322
09/20/11 8:21 pm
09/20/11 8:21 pm
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,959
Maryland
JD Offline

Moto-Amish
JD  Offline

Moto-Amish

Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,959
Maryland
Greg is right. Take your time, measure everything. I rebuilt my lower end twice in 200 miles because I didn't take the time to measure clearances.


Josh
Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: JD] #395375
09/21/11 1:04 am
09/21/11 1:04 am
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 4
Torquay
The Major Offline
BritBike Forum member
The Major  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 4
Torquay
Looks like a great project. Does that Intense Fenix next to the Triumph 675 go to 11?

Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: The Major] #395382
09/21/11 2:19 am
09/21/11 2:19 am
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 24
Farmington, Newer Mexico
O
officerleroy Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
officerleroy  Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
O

Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 24
Farmington, Newer Mexico
Yes, the Fenix goes to 11
[Linked Image]

But so does the Triumph. No chicken strips here...
[Linked Image]



I think I'll be happy with making "10" louder on the Lightning.

More to follow.

Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: officerleroy] #395437
09/21/11 12:43 pm
09/21/11 12:43 pm
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 151
Greensboro NC
H
holdfastgreg Offline
BritBike Forum member
holdfastgreg  Offline
BritBike Forum member
H

Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 151
Greensboro NC
Hey man, if you got free moment Oct 7 - 9. Theres vintage racing at Barber Motorsports in Alabama. Pretty good haul for you but its a real good place to see old bikes on and off the track racing. Biggest motorcycle museum and a big swap meet. I am suggesting it because you'll get the old bike bug even worse and you might be able to score a lot of parts and tid bits for nothing - plus meet a bunch of us crusty socks there.

As for finding a place to start. I'd do a dry fitment of the motor into the frame, suspension and just get a feel for what things will look like. Don't worry about having hardware just yet. Use your local Ace or hardware store when ready for final assembly (SS and grade 8 bolts add a good touch to the bike and it shows you took time on the little things.)

Once you have a rough fitment, take a picture for memory and disassemble the bike and send the frame, oil tank, engine mounts and swing arm to the coaters. send the tins to a painter and get busy on the top end.

Some good vendors to check out:
MAP Cycle
Frank Deihl Classic Cycle
British Cycle Supply
Rabers (good source for tappets and new push rods)
eBay

You're going to find that one vendor is pricier on products a,b, and c, but cheaper on x, y, and z. You can buy the cheapest from each person or just support the vendor that you get the best vibe/service from. I will warn you, everyone who sells British parts are extremely knowledgeable and helpful but they will also tell you how you should build your bike.

Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: holdfastgreg] #395459
09/21/11 3:18 pm
09/21/11 3:18 pm
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 24
Farmington, Newer Mexico
O
officerleroy Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
officerleroy  Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
O

Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 24
Farmington, Newer Mexico
What? Vintage Racing? Barber Motorsports? Swap meet? Count me in!!

I've got a free flight that's needing to be redeemed and I think this would be the perfect use.


Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: officerleroy] #395468
09/21/11 3:45 pm
09/21/11 3:45 pm
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 151
Greensboro NC
H
holdfastgreg Offline
BritBike Forum member
holdfastgreg  Offline
BritBike Forum member
H

Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 151
Greensboro NC
Originally Posted by officerleroy
What? Vintage Racing? Barber Motorsports? Swap meet? Count me in!!

I've got a free flight that's needing to be redeemed and I think this would be the perfect use.



The airport is about 20 minutes away from Barber. I'll be in a cargo van and can come pick you up Friday morning and drop you off Sunday. I'd like to leave town around lunch as its about an 8 hour drive back to NC. I have a camping pass - just need a tent and 3 day pass. Bring money (some vendors take cards but not all.) Museum is cash entry I believe. 3 days of racing (dirt and road), swap meet and a bunch of guys who like old bikes.


....if you do go, you will need to meet the Crusty Slugs - always crusty, always sluggish. They all camp in Camp B (i hear their moonshine is good...but I might need another bottle to tell you for sure.)

Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: holdfastgreg] #395716
09/23/11 1:21 am
09/23/11 1:21 am
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 24
Farmington, Newer Mexico
O
officerleroy Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
officerleroy  Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
O

Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 24
Farmington, Newer Mexico
So here's my first progress update.

First up is the before pictures:
[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]

And here's the after:
[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]

I went to autozone and picked up some turtle wax chrome polish, some WD40, and a coke. Hands down the coke worked the best on the rims to remove rust. I wadded up some foil and the coke lifted the rust up incredibly fast. The spokes were the biggest hassle and I'm still not 100% satisfied. The coke didn't work quite as well as WD40 on a scotch pad for the spokes. Where the spokes overlap and down by the nipples could use a little more cleaning.

I'm looking in to powder coat shops and where to get the top end done, but I'm going to be saving my money for the swap meet in Barber. Come on cheap chrome tank...

Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: officerleroy] #395774
09/23/11 12:29 pm
09/23/11 12:29 pm
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 151
Greensboro NC
H
holdfastgreg Offline
BritBike Forum member
holdfastgreg  Offline
BritBike Forum member
H

Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 151
Greensboro NC
Looking good! Never thought about using Coke to lift rust on the wheels - might need to try that!

Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: officerleroy] #395833
09/23/11 6:22 pm
09/23/11 6:22 pm
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 1,835
British Columbia
hh Offline
BritBike Forum member
hh  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 1,835
British Columbia
The Coke converts the rust to iron phosphate which is at least more stable than rust. Better is to use a rust converter which also has tannic acid, which converts the rust to a more stable iron tannate which is blue-black in colour.


"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin
Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: wbabojo] #395843
09/23/11 8:18 pm
09/23/11 8:18 pm
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 24
Farmington, Newer Mexico
O
officerleroy Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
officerleroy  Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
O

Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 24
Farmington, Newer Mexico
Originally Posted by wbabojo
Do you have access to Whitworth tools?


I researched a little about Whitworth and all I was finding was concering thread pitch. So what does that have to do with needing specific wrenches/tools? Yes, I realize there are Whitworth wrenches, but I couldn't find an explanation on the difference between a Whitworth 7/16" or an American 7/16" wrench.

AS for the rust, I didn't even know you could "convert" it. I thought you just removed it like polishing a surface scrath away. But i don't guess coke has the abrasive characteristics of a polish, so it has to be chemically converting it. I dunno, all I know is that it's shiny now.

Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: officerleroy] #395845
09/23/11 8:44 pm
09/23/11 8:44 pm
Joined: Sep 2002
Posts: 7,728
Seattle
Alex Offline

BritBike Forum member
Alex  Offline

BritBike Forum member

Joined: Sep 2002
Posts: 7,728
Seattle
Originally Posted by officerleroy

I researched a little about Whitworth and all I was finding was concering thread pitch. So what does that have to do with needing specific wrenches/tools? Yes, I realize there are Whitworth wrenches, but I couldn't find an explanation on the difference between a Whitworth 7/16" or an American 7/16" wrench.


Well, as you may have discovered already, american and metric wrenches don't quite fit right on your bike's hex nuts and bolts. That's because, for some retarded reason, british standard or "Whitworth" hex heads don't fall on even fractions of an inch. So, since they didn't want to label wrenches with the dimensions across the flats like Metric and SAE wrenches do, ending up with wrenches labeled 0.521" and 0.708", the wrenches are sized according to the screw thread nominal major diameter. Unfortunately, this also means that, since BSW (british standard whitworth or british coarse thread) and BSF (British standard fine thread) have different head sizes, the wrenches must be labeled in both. So, they often are labeled with both BSW and BSF sizes. Since your bike won't actually have any BSW bolts or nuts on it, you can ignore this...of course it doesn't really have any BSF bolts on it either...because BSA used mostly cycle thread (BSC) or Cycle Engineers Institute (CEI) threads. Confused? Any normal mortal would be....but it is all in the minutiae that you can delve into later once you've gotten a set of wrenches that actually fits the nuts and bolts on your bike.

I can recommend these to get you started.


A smattering:
'53 Gold Flash
'67 Royal Star
'71 Rickman Metisse
'40 Silver Star
'37 Rudge Special
sixtyseventy Lightboltrocket road racer...and many more.
Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: ] #395852
09/23/11 9:13 pm
09/23/11 9:13 pm
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 1,733
Christchurch, NZ
Kevin (NZ). Offline
BritBike Forum member
Kevin (NZ).  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 1,733
Christchurch, NZ
Quote
Whitworth spanner (wrench) markings refer to the bolt diameter rather than the distance across the flats of the hexagon (A/F) as in other standards. Confusion also arises because BSF hexagon sizes can be one size smaller than the corresponding Whitworth hexagon


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Standard_Whitworth

Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: Kevin (NZ).] #395858
09/23/11 9:22 pm
09/23/11 9:22 pm
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 24
Farmington, Newer Mexico
O
officerleroy Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
officerleroy  Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
O

Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 24
Farmington, Newer Mexico
Ya I checked out the wikipedia article. Just enough information there to not know what to apply at all. The 8 wrench set from british fasteners comes with a thread guage! woohoo! I'd be stupid not to get it right? eBay's got a couple sets too I may go with.

Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: officerleroy] #395865
09/23/11 9:44 pm
09/23/11 9:44 pm
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 4,036
Sydney Australia
B
BSA_WM20 Online content
BritBike Forum member
BSA_WM20  Online Content
BritBike Forum member
B

Joined: May 2004
Posts: 4,036
Sydney Australia
Well to really confuse you head sizes go like this;
Whitworth was originally designed for bolting cast iron parts together and cast iron to wood.
The head size is a fixed ratio of the thread size calculated to apply a specific clamping force ( that's right I have forgoton the numbers ).
Whitworth fine was designed to bolt steel parts together. Fine bolts were made from a stronger grade of steel so did not need as big a head so they used the next smaller head size.
During WWI steel alloys were standardized and standards set out for nuts & bolts.
During WWII it was decided that the head size could be reduced, mainly to save steel, without compromising the strength of the bolt. The new size was just a bit bigger than the next size down and as the object was to save steel the heads became slightly smaller to the next smaller standard size.
The engineering is very good, just not very used friendly.
Whitworth now became British Standard Whitworth ( BS ) but low grade hardwear galvanised Whitworth bolts were still ( and are still ) being made thus spanners were marked with 2 sizes, W & BS.

The same also happens with metric
An 8mm bolt may have either a 12mm or 13mm head
A 6 mm bolt may have either an 8 mm or 9 mm head depending upon the grade of the bolt.
One system was designed by engineers to make sense to engineers.
The other was designed by producers to make sense to non engineer consumers.

A full set of Whitworth spanners has 1/2 the number of head sizes as a full set of metric spanners spanning the same shaft sizes.

British Standard Cycle (BSC) came from Cycle Engineers Institute ( CEI ) once again , engineers developing an engineering solution not a consummer solution.
Being engineers they decided to use the same head sizes as Whitworth but as they were a higher strength thread, they opted for a smaller ( but still standard ) head size so they used the next lower head size ( which is what happened in WWII )
The actual thread form was designed to be resistant to loosening from vibration due to operating or from the road which is why CEI remained in use for such a long time

Last edited by BSA_WM20; 09/23/11 9:56 pm.

Bike Beesa
Trevor
Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: officerleroy] #395871
09/23/11 10:16 pm
09/23/11 10:16 pm
Joined: Feb 2003
Posts: 2,818
Ohio
R
Rickman Offline
BritBike Forum member
Rickman  Offline
BritBike Forum member
R

Joined: Feb 2003
Posts: 2,818
Ohio
Originally Posted by officerleroy
Originally Posted by wbabojo
Do you have access to Whitworth tools?

So what does that have to do with needing specific wrenches/tools? Yes, I realize there are Whitworth wrenches, but I couldn't find an explanation on the difference between a Whitworth 7/16" or an American 7/16" wrench.


To answer your question directly, an American 7/16" wrench is .441" wide, while a Whitworth 7/16" wrench is .8165" wide. At least the ones I have in front of me are...

It's weird, I don't understand it, I know they are different, even from metric sizes, so I just go buy the danged wrenches, and sockets.

EVEN SO! Having standard, metric, AND Whitworth [ or is it Wentworth? ] tools, there STILL are nutz and boltz that NOTHING but a FACTORY tool will fit! Correctly, anyway...
Brett

Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: officerleroy] #395875
09/23/11 10:33 pm
09/23/11 10:33 pm
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 1,715
The Northwoods... Michigan
Steve Erickson Online content
BritBike Forum member
Steve Erickson  Online Content
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 1,715
The Northwoods... Michigan
I dassn't say this out loud here, so I'll just type this softly... Metrinch.

Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: officerleroy] #395876
09/23/11 10:44 pm
09/23/11 10:44 pm
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 9,896
Scotland
kommando Online content
BritBike Forum member
kommando  Online Content
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 9,896
Scotland
Metrinch, have a set of spanners and a set of sockets. Work really well except in tight spaces where the slack due to the higher clearances means you have to have the correct Whitworth spanner. When you can use them they really save the edges of the nuts and are good on already rounded nuts.

Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: Steve Erickson] #395886
09/24/11 12:00 am
09/24/11 12:00 am
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,431
Minnesota, US
Jim Hultman Offline
BritBike Forum member
Jim Hultman  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,431
Minnesota, US
Originally Posted by Steve Erickson
I dassn't say this out loud here, so I'll just type this softly... Metrinch.

Blasphemy!!!! eek

Get real wrenches! You'll need all three. Whitworth, SAE and metric. For example, the foot rest nuts on these bikes is 20mm. No other wrench I've ever seen fits. And you really should have both box and open ends as well. And you should have the same sets in sockets, both six point and 12 point. LOTS of wrenches! grin

You get used to it, though the work bench can get a little cluttered with all the different wrench sets. Personally, I only use open ends where I have to, box ends being so much nicer to the bolt heads and nuts.

Believe me, working on these bikes is a LOT more fun with the proper tools. Just sayin'

Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: ] #395890
09/24/11 12:22 am
09/24/11 12:22 am
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,431
Minnesota, US
Jim Hultman Offline
BritBike Forum member
Jim Hultman  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,431
Minnesota, US
Originally Posted by 1968BSA
what i don't get is, if there is rust, then the chrome is no longer, so if you have removed he rust, there is nothing left than bare metal, or maybe a bit of nickel plate.

These wheels are lovely and show good chrome, isn't it a possibility that it was just scum on the chrome?

I've always wondered about this as well. Chrome has no iron content so it simply can't rust. Yet every old bike I've ever had, and I've had a bunch, has had some sort of rust on the chrome.

If the chrome has pinholes in it, I can understand it. The rust is coming from below and the chrome is pretty well shot. Re-chrome it.

But in many, many cases, the rust is apparently only on the surface. It's red. It's rust. And it comes off easily, IF you know how. And that's a REALLY BIG IF!!

Most "experts" will tell you to use steel wool. Probably the most destructive thing possible for a polished surface such as chrome. Yet again and again, I hear the same thing. Steel wool. Ridiculous!

The aluminum foil you used is a good choice. An even better choice is simple bronze wool. Available at any hardware store, use it with a little WD40 or any other decent lubricant, and it is magic.

I've done many wheels like Leroy's and brought them back to life the same way. I love it when that happens!! :bigt

Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: Jim Hultman] #395909
09/24/11 1:42 am
09/24/11 1:42 am
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 1,715
The Northwoods... Michigan
Steve Erickson Online content
BritBike Forum member
Steve Erickson  Online Content
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 1,715
The Northwoods... Michigan
"Believe me, working on these bikes is a LOT more fun with the proper tools. Just sayin'"

See, I knew it... believe me, I have those "proper" tools... and they mostly stay in the drawer, as Metrinch does 99% of what is needed. Including footrests. Just dis-assembled a B44VR with it last night, and will re-assemble in a couple weeks with it again. Keep it simple...

(Prepared to dodge the barrage of 12 point, 28.7 TPI, 3/4 UH BSC/CEI/UPS dome head Cadmium plated Molybendum Rockwell hardened 60 degree thread NOS BSA OEM fasteners...requiring a special tool)

Re: '66 Lightning project [Re: Steve Erickson] #395915
09/24/11 2:01 am
09/24/11 2:01 am
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,431
Minnesota, US
Jim Hultman Offline
BritBike Forum member
Jim Hultman  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,431
Minnesota, US
Originally Posted by Steve Erickson
Metrinch does 99% of what is needed.

Dude, you're deranged! If I saw a mechanic working on my bike with those I would find another mechanic. Do you know any professionals who use them?

To each his own, and I suppose they would suffice in an emergency, but to use them as your regular tools? Crazy! crazy

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3

Moderated by  Allan Gill, Jon W. Whitley 

Home | Sponsors | Newsletter | Regalia | Calendar | Bike Project | BritBike Museum | Spiders Cartoons | DVD- Manuals & Parts books
Upgrade to: Premium Membership | Premium Life Membership | Vendor Membership | Site Sponsor Membership
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.1