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#332051 - 09/06/10 7:19 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto ***** [Re: TR6Ray]  
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Maui Hawaii
I used aero for my '62 but the frieght sent by UPS cost nearly as much as the plating. They did a superlative job, however.
I'd love to get my hands on a restoration project of this caliber. Mostly I just start with an unrelated pile of junk that used to be a chopper.
As far as fasteners are concerned, a lot of grief can be avoided by buying new ones where the rust has eaten away much of it. The best restorations send all the new stuff(which is usually zinc plated) along with all the original hardware to be cad plated. That way it all matches from the start and ages at the same rate.
On my bikes one of the most time consuming parts of the whole restoration is preparing the hardware for plating. I'll spend hours with a file removing damage. I couldn't do it without my compressor and blast cabnet, though.
Keep up the good work. I love seeing pics of the original paintwork. Most folks never get the details, such as the underside of the tank, correct.
Bill


Bikes
1974 Commando
1985 Honda Nighthawk 650
1957 Thunderbird/T110 "Flying Tiger"
Antique Fans: Loads of Emersons (Two six wingers) plus gyros and orbiters.
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#332070 - 09/06/10 8:25 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: HawaiianTiger]  
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Illinois, USA
Tiger,

Thanks for the additional recommendation regarding aero. I didn't even know those big brown trucks could run between Hawaii and Colorado!

Disregarding the fact that freight to and from Illinois would be a lot cheaper with no ocean to cross, it still helps build my case for carrying them out there on 2 wheels. Right now, I can't get the thought off my mind. Depending on turn-around at aero, I could drop off my stuff, loop around through the mountains for a couple or more days, and take my finished hardware back home with me. Have I equalled the shipping cost yet?

Also, my parts guy keeps telling me how easy, easy, easy my project is, since everything was there when I started. I know that's true, and it's one reason I thought I could muddle through this as a beginner.

A file! Why didn't that occur to me? I'm pretty darn good with a file, if I say so myself. I hadn't considered filing the rust pits. Some of them would certainly be shallow enough.

That's also a good tip about sending in the new and old hardware in one batch. My trouble now is that I need to get my blasted stuff turned in quickly before it starts to re-rust. Maybe if the new and old hardware all get exposed to the great outdoors starting at the same time they would age together appropriately. Do you notice much variation batch to batch with the plating?


'64 TR6R Plus some Twins from other countries (U.S., Germany, Japan)
#332075 - 09/06/10 8:46 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: HawaiianTiger]  
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Originally Posted By: HawaiianTiger
I used aero for my '62 but the frieght sent by UPS cost nearly as much as the plating. They did a superlative job, however.


You're right, I forgot about the shipping cost. I sent my parts in a USPS Flat Rate box for $10.70 and Aero Propeller returned them UPS for considerably more, not nearly as much as the plating however. I have another batch there now, so I should have updated shipping and plating costs soon.

Eric


1971 T120RV (R.I.P.)
1973 T140V/TR7
1993 Ducati 900 SS
#332079 - 09/06/10 8:52 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: HawaiianTiger]  
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Originally Posted by HawaiianTiger
I'd love to get my hands on a restoration project of this caliber. Mostly I just start with an unrelated pile of junk that used to be a chopper.
Bill


Here's a story that'll really make you cringe. About 6 years ago, I gave away a 1958 500cc basket case. It was a rolling chassis (on flat tires), with most of the engine and tranny intact, plus a few boxes of parts, extra jugs, point sets, etc. A guy had it stored for 10 years or so, and was going to junk it. He gave it to my brother-in-law who stored it for another 8 or 9 years. He gave it to me. I stored it for about 7 more years, until the wife said it was time to get rid of it. I gave it to a friend who is a good mechanic, a good painter, and a long time Triumph lover. I told him there was no title, but I would haul it to his house for free and he could have it, no charge, if he was willing to take it off my hands.

Fast forward about 6 months. My brother-in-law found the title and gave it to me. I took it to the guy who had the bike. I told him I figured he hadn't touched the old bike and maybe never would, but here's the title, for whatever it's worth.

He replied that the bike was nearly road worthy. Less than a month after that, he showed up in my driveway on it and gave me a picture of it. He recently trailered it down to Georgia for the GABMA rally. He ran it on several 250 mile loop trips while he was there. The soles of his shoes were worn off at an angle from cornering. He said he couldn't believe how excellent that old bike was to ride.

Here's what it looked like after he first got it going . . .

[Linked Image]

He was not a bit concerned with historical accuracy. He built it to make himself happy. Since this time, he has refitted it with a re-pop front rim, laced to a later front hub with twin leading shoe brakes. He rides it a lot!

Do I kick myself over this? No -- I know I wouldn't have gotten it going, and he did. I sorta feel like I helped rescue an old bike by giving it to him, and I am glad he is having fun with it!

Seeing what he did with the old basket case also inspired me to go get my TR6. I called him before I bought it and got his advice. It was basically, "If you don't go after it, you are crazy. If you decide not to get it, please let me be the first to know where it is!"


'64 TR6R Plus some Twins from other countries (U.S., Germany, Japan)
#332093 - 09/06/10 9:34 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: TR6Ray]  
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Maui Hawaii
I'm kinda AR when it comes to hardware. Long ago when attending every bike show for 500miles I discovered the real difference between one restoration and another. It's in the little details like fasteners. Nothing ruins a good restoration than finding ugly garbage like acorn nuts on an otherwise good resto. I don't even like socket head case screws to tell the truth. They cause more problems than they solve.
There are always small differences from one batch of cad to another in my experience. Don't be afraid to coat your prepared fasteners in oil to preserve them before plating. They will go through a thorough cleaning before they go into the bath if for no other reason than to protect the bath from contamination.
Bill


Bikes
1974 Commando
1985 Honda Nighthawk 650
1957 Thunderbird/T110 "Flying Tiger"
Antique Fans: Loads of Emersons (Two six wingers) plus gyros and orbiters.
#332101 - 09/06/10 9:53 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: HawaiianTiger]  
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Illinois, USA
Originally Posted By: HawaiianTiger
There are always small differences from one batch of cad to another in my experience. Don't be afraid to coat your prepared fasteners in oil to preserve them before plating. They will go through a thorough cleaning before they go into the bath if for no other reason than to protect the bath from contamination.
Bill


O.K., thanks. I was under the impression that the platers wouldn't do any prep work -- if it didn't come in clean, they wouldn't touch it. That's why I bead blasted all the rust and grime away. Maybe an oil film is different. I'll call aero and another place I've heard about tomorrow, and ask them.

Anyone had any experience with JD Plating in Waukegan IL?


'64 TR6R Plus some Twins from other countries (U.S., Germany, Japan)
#332709 - 09/10/10 1:16 am Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: TR6Ray]  
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Following advice from HawaiianTiger, I have been reworking my hardware as needed to get rid of any pitting. Mostly I'm using a file, but also some other implements of destruction like strips of various grit of emery paper, and my Dremel Tool. I have just a handful left to do, and I think it is a big improvement. I appreciate the advice. Thanks, Bill!

I think I am going to just stay in Illinois for my cad work. I called JD Plating and he said he can probably flip it in one or two days. He said 15 pounds would run me about $85.00

I'll post the results later.

Last edited by TR6Ray; 09/10/10 1:17 am.

'64 TR6R Plus some Twins from other countries (U.S., Germany, Japan)
#332711 - 09/10/10 1:20 am Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: TR6Ray]  
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85$ for 15 lbs is a good deal. Looking forward to seeing pics of the results.
Bill


Bikes
1974 Commando
1985 Honda Nighthawk 650
1957 Thunderbird/T110 "Flying Tiger"
Antique Fans: Loads of Emersons (Two six wingers) plus gyros and orbiters.
#332720 - 09/10/10 2:20 am Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: HawaiianTiger]  
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San Rafael, Ca.
I just got my last batch back from Aero Propeller:



$150.00 for 25 lbs, or $6.00/lb. with a 3 week turnaround.

Eric


1971 T120RV (R.I.P.)
1973 T140V/TR7
1993 Ducati 900 SS
#332781 - 09/10/10 12:42 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: TR6Ray]  
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Eric,

Great picture you had (I saved a copy in my thread backup before the evildoers at Photobucket wiped everything out). With your hardware sorted and laid out like that, it looks like one big, beautiful, 3 dimensional puzzle.

[Linked Image]

It also reminds me that there are some bits (chain adjusters, adjuster end plates, wheel bearing retainer, etc.) that I don't have in my cad box. Guess I better make one more sweep through my parts so I don't have to end up turning in more than one batch to the plater.

Going through this stuff bit by bit makes me appreciate the artistry in the details on the old Triumph -- domed bolt heads and so forth. I'm glad I have the original hardware.


'64 TR6R Plus some Twins from other countries (U.S., Germany, Japan)
#332798 - 09/10/10 3:05 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: TR6Ray]  
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I also use USPS flat rate boxes, however:

Insert one box inside another for durability, and tape them up heavily upon closing.

I managed FIFTY-FIVE pounds in ONE box, for $10-something.

The Postal clerk looked at me sideways when I struggled to heft that dang box onto the counter! He said "that's cheating", to which I replied (and he ought to know) "If it fits, it ships"!

IF you can get the plater to return the shipment in the same manner, it's the best deal out there.

It would take 4 bikes worth of hardware to meet Burbank's minimum, for the same flat rate. So, I typically scrounge through the shop for anything and everything that will fit in the box. Over the years, I've turned half of my bits and bobs from rusty, oily junk into freshly Cad plated junk!


GrandPaul (does not use emoticons)
Author of the book "Old Bikes"
Too many bikes to list, mostly Triumph & Norton, some BSA & European
"The Iron in your blood should be Vintage"
#332816 - 09/10/10 5:29 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: TR6Ray]  
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Originally Posted By: TR6Ray


Going through this stuff bit by bit makes me appreciate the artistry in the details on the old Triumph -- domed bolt heads and so forth. I'm glad I have the original hardware.


You bet, it's a pleasure to reassemble a bike with fresh chrome,paint and cad. I'd rather have a scratch on my gas tank than a grade 2 bolt from Home Depot on my bike. Don't even get me started on those cheap red/blue/yellow vinyl electrical connectors.

Eric


1971 T120RV (R.I.P.)
1973 T140V/TR7
1993 Ducati 900 SS
#332989 - 09/11/10 9:27 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: BikeVice]  
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Maui Hawaii
Originally Posted By: BikeVice
[quote=TR6Ray]

I'd rather have a scratch on my gas tank than a grade 2 bolt from Home Depot on my bike. Don't even get me started on those cheap red/blue/yellow vinyl electrical connectors.

Eric

Exactly! laughing


Bikes
1974 Commando
1985 Honda Nighthawk 650
1957 Thunderbird/T110 "Flying Tiger"
Antique Fans: Loads of Emersons (Two six wingers) plus gyros and orbiters.
#333046 - 09/12/10 2:22 am Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: TR6Ray]  
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O.K., so I saw Eric's picture of his hardware all laid out nice and pretty. Realized I had forgotten some things. I made another sweep through my storage bins. Still had cad parts in boxes labelled Front Wheel, Rear Wheel, Harness & Electrical, even had my rim locks left in a misc. bin.

This stuff I found was still grungy, which took the wind out of my sails for sure. I had thought I was all done filing and reworking. So, another four hours at the bead blast cabinet today. Now I have it for sure -- I think!

Since I don't trust my memory, I'm laying out each little baggie of hardware on a piece of white paper and taking a picture of it. Then I'm pasting the picture into a MS Word document. Under each picture is the label from the baggie. I'm also typing in a description for each item. I get this by measuring each and every bolt, nut, washer, lock washer, spacer, etc with my calipers (inside diameter, outside diameter, length and so forth). It's a lot of work, but I will feel more comfortable mixing it all together for the plater. The document is 26 pages & 1600 words long, and counting -- I still have to add the parts I worked on today.

After all this, if that guy loses my stuff, I won't be responsible for my actions!


'64 TR6R Plus some Twins from other countries (U.S., Germany, Japan)
#333048 - 09/12/10 2:29 am Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: TR6Ray]  
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Here's a question for you guys. What about the fork springs? My old springs looked like unplated steel, but had very little rust. I bead blasted them and figured I would get them cad plated. I'm wondering though, if I should get some new springs with progressive windings. Were these old bikes a little soft on the front suspension? Will plating harm the old springs if I reuse them? I know that chrome plating can cause hydrogen embrittlement, but I don't know what effect, if any, cadmium has.


'64 TR6R Plus some Twins from other countries (U.S., Germany, Japan)
#333055 - 09/12/10 3:15 am Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: TR6Ray]  
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New progressive wound fork springs are available and not terribly expensive. I would replace the old springs and not worry about chrome or whatever plating. Just replace the fork gaiters when they fail( use to be about every other year ) and no one will ever see them. Except you. I doubt rust will be too much of an issue.

#333107 - 09/12/10 4:40 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: bykerhd]  
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Originally Posted by bykerhd
New progressive wound fork springs are available and not terribly expensive. I would replace the old springs and not worry about chrome or whatever plating. Just replace the fork gaiters when they fail( use to be about every other year ) and no one will ever see them. Except you. I doubt rust will be too much of an issue.


That's probably good advice. I might as well shop for springs while it's apart. I've got the new gaiters and clamps for it. That's one area where the Japanese seem to have it over on the Brits. My other old barn bike is a little Honda I'm putting back together. Although its gaiters were filthy dirty, they cleaned up to look like new, and are still soft and pliable. The Triumph gaiters both had holes rotted in them and the stanchion tubes were so rusty and pitted that I bought new ones. Here's the old Brit gaiter held up next to the little CL 350 . . .

[Linked Image]

In all fairness, the TR6 is 46 years old, and the Honda is only 39. I think the TR6 gaiters feel like actual rubber, while the Honda gaiters seem to be a blend of plastic, which was the miracle material just getting a real good foothold in 1971.


'64 TR6R Plus some Twins from other countries (U.S., Germany, Japan)
#333116 - 09/12/10 5:12 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: TR6Ray]  
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Britbodger R.I.P. Offline
In Remembrance
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Houston Texas
I am really enjoying reading posts of your progress!

Bit off on a tangent I know, but believe that the 64 frame had a steeper head angle than later years that results in sharper handling when cornering than the later models. As a result that frame is much sort after by vintage dirt trackers,road racers and road riders who like riding the twisties!

Not sure as to why Triumph made the change in head angle but rumor has it that most American riders didn't like the sharper handling of the 64 frame preferring the superior straight line stability that a increased head angle provides.

Stand to be corrected on this but thats what I've heard.

Maybe the Triumph gurus (John Healy!) grin will step-in and either verify or correct me on my understanding.

beerchug

P.S. I bought a TR6C 1970 model new and still own it! loved every minute of riding it!



Last edited by Britbodger; 09/12/10 5:16 pm.
#333155 - 09/12/10 8:11 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: Britbodger R.I.P.]  
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Britbodger,

Thanks for the kind words. I'm new to Triumph, so all I know is what I have read. I think the head angle was revised a couple years later, in 1966. In 1964, the big feature changes they were touting were . . .

* Completely redesigned front fork

[Linked Image]

* New footrests mounted on the rear engine plates to give greater ground clearance.

* First year for Smith's magnetic speedometers and matching tachometers with internal anti-vibration mountings.

According to Lindsay Brooke's excellent book, "Triumph Motorcycles - A Century of Passion and Power" . . .

"The problematic duplex frame that lasted just three model years was replaced in 1963. This one reverted to a single front downtube, beefier than in 1959. It was welded into a splayed engine cradle and the rear subframe bolted on as before, but with a stiffer swing arm and stouter engine and swing-arm mounts. This basic chassis would serve Triumph's 650-cc twins admirably through the 1970 model year, and in similar form was used on the T100s until 1973. Early versions still exhibited stubborn wobbles at speeds over 90 miles per hour, requiring riders to twist the steering damper. A much stronger fork with external springs was added in 1964 and it helped improve stability and ride quality.

But the significant changes that made good twins great were brought by Doug Hele between 1966 and 1968. They included a revised steering head angle; further reinforcement around the swinging arm; two-way fork damping, with shuttle-valve internals, an excellent 8-inch front brake with twin-leading shoe; and scores of engine and gearbox improvements"

If you have a 1970 TR6C, you got all the good stuff listed above and barely missed out on the Slumberglade Hall "improvements" of higher seat height and OIF of 1971.

I think it is awesome that you bought your bike new and you are still enjoying it. I think the best and easiest way to get yourself a classic motorcycle is to wisely pick a new bike to buy, and then gracefully grow old with it. By this, I mean no bobbing, chopping, cafe-ing, painting,etc. If you add aftermarket parts -- OK, but save what you took off. If you want to bob, chop, cafe, customize, etc. buy something unrestorable and have your way with it. Show the world your artistic capability. I love looking at the "bitsa bikes" on here. Some of these guys are excellent engineers, painters, and designers -- way beyond anything I will ever be capable of. But I don't like to see classics (cars, trucks, or motorcycles) cut up. That's just my philosophy, and I will shut up now.


'64 TR6R Plus some Twins from other countries (U.S., Germany, Japan)
#333364 - 09/13/10 9:09 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: TR6Ray]  
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Last night I finished prepping the rest of my cad parts, along with taking pictures to identify it all later.

Took a break today to go pick up the final 3 pieces of work still at the chrome shop. The man offered to UPS them, but there are some really nice 2-lane Illinois blacktops between here and there. I'm always up for any excuse to take a mcy ride, especially on a day like today. Got in about 180 miles of pre-autumn weather, with beautiful russet colored fields being harvested all along the way.

I should have just got re-pops here. These are minor pieces and they had to do them twice. I'm still not thrilled with them, but will use them. The rest of the stuff came out good. At least all the chrome parts are back home on the shelf.

[Linked Image]

On the other hand, I didn't give them much to work with. Here's what the points cover looked like when I first took it in.

[Linked Image]

While at the chrome shop, I asked some questions about cadmium. This shop no longer does it, but did for quite a while before the environmental issues got too difficult. Some answers:

* Hydrogen embrittlement comes from the nickel plating in preparation for chrome plating. Cadmium plating will not in any way cause embrittlement.

* Springs, such as for sidestand or centerstand, should have the coils spread during the plating process by stretching them on some sort of pin or mandrel. This allows the plating to get to all the surface area.

* Zinc plated parts, such as my brand-new gaiter strap clamps, can be cad plated without me doing any prep work. The acid cleaning before the cad plating process will remove the zinc.

* I probably won't do this, but the man said I should have bead blasted any parts where I had filed or sanded to remove rust pits. He said the parts that are shinier from filing than the other parts that were simply bead blasted will be slightly different after cad plating. Shinier parts will plate to a shinier finish. Bead blasting after filing would level the playing field. I'm gonna take my chances -- I'll let you know if I made a mistake here.


'64 TR6R Plus some Twins from other countries (U.S., Germany, Japan)
#333521 - 09/14/10 4:38 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: TR6Ray]  
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One of the hardest things I've had to force myself to do on this project was to open up all the labelled plastic baggies and mix all my hardware together for the cad plater. It's like pulling off a band-aid -- do it quickly and try not to flinch . . .

[Linked Image]

Made up some "stretchers" to slightly open the coils on these old, pitted, springs. Hoping to get cadmium on all the surfaces to prevent rusting. Wonder how long they will last anyway . . .

[Linked Image]

Well, it's all in the box. Soon as the man calls to tell me the paint parts are ready for pickup (was supposed to be week before last), my hardware is off to see the wizard. I'm trying to do this all in one trip. The cad guy is only 30 miles from the paint guy, but they are 165 miles from my house.


'64 TR6R Plus some Twins from other countries (U.S., Germany, Japan)
#333547 - 09/14/10 7:21 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: TR6Ray]  
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Ray,
I'm fairly certain that in '64 Triumph was still using springs that were not cad plated but black oxide or parkerized. The thinking then was that the spring metal would become too brittle from the hydrogen. I think that has been discounted since then and even if it was true it can be easily treated by heat or just letting the parts age. I powdercoat mine, acutally, after cad plating believe it or not. They should last forever!
I'm not seeing your rocker shafts or kick start or shifter shafts in the box. I don't think they were cad plated originally but rusty shaft ends do spoil an otherwise pristine restoration.
Also with every restoration I do, ever single stud gets the treatment too. I've seen lots of otherwise frist class restorations with rusting studs. It makes you wonder what else the restorer neglected to take care of.
Cad plating is the most durable electroplated surface for motorcycle restoration. (I suppose you could silver or gold plate for a longer lasting surface.)
I have forty year old hardware in my collection. If I give them a gentle cleaning with aluminum shot, they look as good as new.
I see aluminum wire ties in the box. Were they cad plated? Originally they were enameled black. I powdercoat these at home in my shop. Other folks I know just blacken them with a Sharpie.
Bill


Bikes
1974 Commando
1985 Honda Nighthawk 650
1957 Thunderbird/T110 "Flying Tiger"
Antique Fans: Loads of Emersons (Two six wingers) plus gyros and orbiters.
#333558 - 09/14/10 9:01 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: HawaiianTiger]  
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Posts: 2,545
TR6Ray Online content
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TR6Ray  Online Content

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Joined: May 2010
Posts: 2,545
Illinois, USA
Originally Posted by HawaiianTiger
I'm fairly certain that in '64 Triumph was still using springs that were not cad plated but black oxide or parkerized. The thinking then was that the spring metal would become too brittle from the hydrogen.


I think you are right about the springs. Mine were not cad plated; they appeared to be either black oxide coated or parkerized. I am 95% sure I am going to buy new springs, but am getting the old ones cad plated just in case. I've been told that cadmium will not cause embrittlement. Hydrogen embrittlement is caused by the nickel plating process, preparatory to chrome plating. I'm talking here about my fork springs. The sidestand, centerstand, and brake switch springs were too rusty to tell what their original finish was.

Originally Posted by HawaiianTiger
I'm not seeing your rocker shafts or kick start or shifter shafts in the box. I don't think they were cad plated originally but rusty shaft ends do spoil an otherwise pristine restoration.
Also with every restoration I do, ever single stud gets the treatment too.


You have very good eyes. The only things yet to come off my engine/transmission are the kick lever, the shift lever, and the points cover. I took these off to get them chromed. The rest of the engine and transmission reside in a Rubbermaid container in my shop. That is a whole 'nother story -- I'll put something on here later. I know -- that will mean another batch for the cad guy.

Originally Posted by HawaiianTiger
I see aluminum wire ties in the box. Were they cad plated? Originally they were enameled black. I powdercoat these at home in my shop. Other folks I know just blacken them with a Sharpie.


They were black, and I will hit them with the rattle can. If I scrape off some paint re-installing them, I'll touch up with an artist's brush. I did not mean to throw them into the cad batch. Obviously, being aluminum they are not going to rust anytime soon!

Originally Posted by HawaiianTiger
Cad plating is the most durable electroplated surface for motorcycle restoration. (I suppose you could silver or gold plate for a longer lasting surface.)
I have forty year old hardware in my collection. If I give them a gentle cleaning with aluminum shot, they look as good as new.


Thanks for that -- it's very reassuring to know. I'm also hoping to give this bike a better environment to live in than it had while it was in the barn.


'64 TR6R Plus some Twins from other countries (U.S., Germany, Japan)
#333843 - 09/16/10 2:16 pm Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: TR6Ray]  
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 2,545
TR6Ray Online content
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TR6Ray  Online Content

BritBike Forum member

Joined: May 2010
Posts: 2,545
Illinois, USA
Long road trip yesterday, but on 4 wheels. Up to Morrie's Place in Ringwood IL to pick up some of the painted parts and a bunch of misc stuff . . .

[Linked Image]

Not a very good picture -- there is a gold pin stripe separating the scarlet and silver, but it doesn't show very well here. I'll put a better one on after I get the stuff back onto the petrol tank. Got a new set of kneepads for it yesterday.

Then over to Waukegan, where I dropped off my hardware to be cad plated by Jose at JD Plating. Then all the way down through Chicago and a stop at Werth's Triumph in Plainfield to visit with friends Mark and Harold. Then back down to central IL to show the paint parts to the PO. We went out to eat, then I went back home (420+ miles).

The side cover and oil tank are still at paint -- they still have to place a couple decals and then clear coat over them. I asked them to shoot the tensioner knob again as well. When these are done, it'll be a repeat trip to pick them up, along with the cad parts.


'64 TR6R Plus some Twins from other countries (U.S., Germany, Japan)
#333998 - 09/17/10 11:46 am Re: 1964 TR6/R Resto [Re: TR6Ray]  
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 2,545
TR6Ray Online content
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TR6Ray  Online Content

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Joined: May 2010
Posts: 2,545
Illinois, USA
Originally Posted By: TR6Ray

* Zinc plated parts, such as my brand-new gaiter strap clamps, can be cad plated without me doing any prep work. The acid cleaning before the cad plating process will remove the zinc.


Wrong -- according to Jose at JD Plating, it would be unwise to acid clean the zinc plated gaiter clamps or some other misc. small bits that I had with me when I dropped off the hardware for cad plating. He said the clamp strips would be likely to break when I wrapped them around the gaiters later. If I want to cad plate them, he said I should bead blast them to remove the zinc, then bring them back to him.

Having never done this before, I am waiting till I get the cad stuff back so I can see how much difference it would make to get the gaiter straps redone in cadmium. I figure there will be one or more trips back to the plater anyway. Hope to have my stuff home within a day or so.


'64 TR6R Plus some Twins from other countries (U.S., Germany, Japan)
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