BritBike Forum logo
BritBike Sponsor BritBike Sponsor BritBike Sponsor
BritBike Sponsor

BritBike Sponsor

BritBike Sponsor
BritBike Sponsor BritBike Sponsor BritBike Sponsor
  JWood Auction  
Home | Sponsors, Newsletter | Regalia | Calendar | Bike Project | BritBike Museum | Spiders Cartoons, "OLD" BritBike Forum | DVD- Manuals & Parts books | BritBike Stickers & Decals
Upgrade to: Premium Membership | Premium Life Membership | Vendor Membership | Site Sponsor Membership
Photo posting tutorial

Member Spotlight
DoubleDiamond
DoubleDiamond
Hampshire, England
Posts: 301
Joined: August 2012
Show All Member Profiles 
Shout Box
Search eBay for motorcycle parts in following countries
Australia, Canada, France, Holland, Italy, United Kingdom, USA
Random Gallery photo
Who's Online Now
213 registered members (57nortonmodel77), 1,789 guests, and 543 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
Brian Ellery, Jon Andrews, Berni Ernst, johnguppy, michael morgan
9955 Registered Users
Top Posters(30 Days)
btour 183
koan58 99
Stuart 87
NickL 63
Popular Topics(Views)
436,625 mail-order LSR
Forum Statistics
Forums33
Topics65,265
Posts632,066
Members9,955
Most Online3,995
Feb 13th, 2017
Like BritBike.com on Facebook

Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Rate This Thread
Page 2 of 5 1 2 3 4 5
#240503 - 03/01/09 8:04 am Re: Measuring alternator output [Re: Derry Hincks]  
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 4,860
DavidP Offline
BritBike Forum member
DavidP  Offline

BritBike Forum member

Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 4,860
Gnashville
Originally Posted By: Derry Hincks


I had been considering buying a 3-phase variable speed motor for testing but finding one at a cheap price (and power, say 1.1kW) is not easy. Cheaper overall would be to stick to twin-pole single-phase motors of similar power (1.1) and use pulleys to change speed. I would only need three speeds 1:1, 2:1 and 1:2 to cover the whole rpm range (near enough). A lot more construction though but it would keep me off the streets at night <s>.

Or you could buy a DC motor and a variable PS.
This is all academic. Does the system charge the battery in use? Does the battery retain a charge?
Yes? Test over!


Stepping on others doesn't make you stand tall.

71 A65L "Zelda"
92 BMW K100rs "Gustav"
Support Your #1 BritBike Forum!
Membership Type! Free
Member
Premium
Member
Premium Life
Member
Vendor
Member
Site
Sponsor
Recognition No Premium Member Premium Life member (5 years) Vendor Member Site Sponsor Membership
Post commercial threads No No No Yes Yes
Custom title No Yes Yes Yes Yes
Upload avatar & photos No Yes Yes Yes Yes
Link avatar & photos Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Private Message Storage: 10 100 100 100 100
Length of signatures 255 600 600 600 600
Removes this very advert island between post 1&2 No Yes Yes Yes Yes
Price Free $12.90/year $105.00 No End
$55.00/5 years
$210.00/year
($17.50/month)
Email
Click on button >>
  Premium Member Premium Life member Vendor Member Site Sponsor Membership
#240509 - 03/01/09 9:47 am Re: Measuring alternator output [Re: DavidP]  
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Derry Hincks Offline
BritBike Forum member
Derry Hincks  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Bordon, England
<Or you could buy a DC motor and a variable PS>
Same rules apply David, can I find a suitable power motor and supply for a cost I am willing to pay (nowt preferably).


Derry.

1969 T100S under reconstruction
GSX-R750K2 (having been rebuilt from a crashed wreck)
#240538 - 03/01/09 1:05 pm Re: Measuring alternator output [Re: Derry Hincks]  
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 804
andrewinpopayan Offline
BritBike Forum member
andrewinpopayan  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 804
Halifax, Butt end of Europe
Derry. A belt and pulley system the same as an old lathe?

I had an old open wound single phase a while ago and did some drawings of how the coils are connected, there are 2 coils in series, making 3 banks of 2 series coils, each of these banks is conected to a common ground, in the 6 volt system it is a "star" configuration normally running on one bank and it switches the other 2 banks into circuit when the lights are "on", in the 12 volt system, the 3 banks are permanantly in parallel


I will see if I can find the drawing I did.

Last edited by andrewinpopayan; 03/01/09 1:11 pm.

99% of carb problems are electrical.

1959 3TA

BMW R1150 Oilhead
#240901 - 03/03/09 4:49 pm Re: Measuring alternator output [Re: andrewinpopayan]  
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Derry Hincks Offline
BritBike Forum member
Derry Hincks  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Bordon, England
Any sign of those drawings Andrew?

By luck I have just bought a caput stator. I am unsure what it is exactly other than it looks like a pre-unit stator. The windings of one coil are adrift and there are no output wires.

But assuming the coils are OK I will be able to wire it in three or single phase modes and make measurements. It will be interesting to see how much the output drops say if I simulate one coil going open circuit (yes I know about a third!)


Derry.

1969 T100S under reconstruction
GSX-R750K2 (having been rebuilt from a crashed wreck)
#240953 - 03/03/09 8:14 pm Re: Measuring alternator output [Re: Derry Hincks]  
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 804
andrewinpopayan Offline
BritBike Forum member
andrewinpopayan  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 804
Halifax, Butt end of Europe
No luck as yet Derry. The coils usually go short to ground, or at least one coil does. It wouldn't be too dificult an excercise to rewind the bobbins one at a time using new wire and "hi tech" modern insulator materials, all you need to do is locate a friendly motor rewinding shop.

The only problem being that the little "lugs" on the stator that secure the bobbins tend to break off when straightening them.

A lathe would be a great help, use a wooden stick in the 4 jaw chuck to form the bobbin and make the winds. If you can post me a close up of the dead stator I would probably be able to identify the winding ends.



Andrew

Last edited by andrewinpopayan; 03/03/09 8:21 pm.

99% of carb problems are electrical.

1959 3TA

BMW R1150 Oilhead
#241030 - 03/04/09 3:02 am Re: Measuring alternator output [Re: andrewinpopayan]  
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Derry Hincks Offline
BritBike Forum member
Derry Hincks  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Bordon, England
<The coils usually go short to ground>
Yes I've read that before, do you know why? Is it vibration wearing away the wire coating?

Yes I do have a lathe so winding is not out of the question. Quite a few years ago I wound my own guitar pickups by hand with IIRC 47swg wire so these coils shouldn't be too tricky <innocent look>.

Thanks for the input.


Derry.

1969 T100S under reconstruction
GSX-R750K2 (having been rebuilt from a crashed wreck)
#241607 - 03/07/09 4:23 pm Re: Measuring alternator output [Re: Derry Hincks]  
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 804
andrewinpopayan Offline
BritBike Forum member
andrewinpopayan  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 804
Halifax, Butt end of Europe
Yes. it's the vibration and heat acting on old varnish, the plastic coated paper and old phenolic board.

They sometimes go short across ajacent layers in a coil and you get very low output. a simple "shorted turns" tester will detect these, so you might only have to replace 1 bobbin.
When you wind a coil and have tested it, brush the bobbin well with thin epoxy or fiberglass resin to secure the windings firmly. Silk covered enamelled wire would be my first choice.

Last edited by andrewinpopayan; 03/07/09 4:25 pm.

99% of carb problems are electrical.

1959 3TA

BMW R1150 Oilhead
#241623 - 03/07/09 6:54 pm Re: Measuring alternator output [Re: andrewinpopayan]  
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 94
Russ Hunt Offline
BritBike Forum member
Russ Hunt  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 94
PA
They short to ground because the "bobbins" are just very thin phenolic and they are not held in place with enough varnish. They just fall apart leaving the wires to rub on the pole piece. I rebuilt mine - also an open construction type - for my '66 G80CS. I have details in my ancient archives but I made new coil forms out of 1/16" fiberglass PC board material by cutting and sanding the various pieces and then epoxying them together. I counted the turns when I unwound them and was able to just re-wrap by hand. The wire I used had a much more modern type of red insulation. (It helps to know a transformer engineer.) It can be handwound easily with no lathe needed. When all done I soaked the entire assembly in polyurethane and wiggled it around until all the bubbles were out of it and then let it drip dry. (Ideally you could put it under a vacuum to assure perfect penetration of the varnish. An old-time motor or transformer shop could do this for you.) It is still working. If I had to do it again I might try to find actual plastic bobbins or coil forms from a manufacturer. Check the Thomas Register.
Russ

Last edited by Russ Hunt; 03/07/09 6:56 pm. Reason: oops
#241703 - 03/08/09 5:07 am Re: Measuring alternator output [Re: Russ Hunt]  
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Derry Hincks Offline
BritBike Forum member
Derry Hincks  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Bordon, England
<Check the Thomas Register>
You've lost me there Russ, is that a trade directory?

Moving on I was reading the Lucas service manual and noticed a really weired circuit diagram for four-wire alternators. In the lights 'off' position two phases of the alternator are shorted out to reduce the output of the remaining phase to reduce overcharging of the battery. How bizarre.

Just at that time I noticed a four-wire alternator for not too much buy-it-now so I bought it. It will make interesting testing.

I've also managed to find a Triumph service sheet that lists all the numbers for alternators, reg, zeners etc up to 1967 with the bikes they were fitted to. So the hunt is on for numbers following on from that.

A nine pole alternator would be nice to test as well.


Derry.

1969 T100S under reconstruction
GSX-R750K2 (having been rebuilt from a crashed wreck)
#242773 - 03/13/09 5:59 pm Re: Measuring alternator output - T140 [Re: Derry Hincks]  
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Derry Hincks Offline
BritBike Forum member
Derry Hincks  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Bordon, England
I've just tested a T140 stator and rotor. This is a three phase 9-pole stator rated at I believe 132W. Stator 47252A Rotor 54212006.

I am disappointed with it's output as it seems worse than my T100 6-pole alternator. If you look at the load1 oscilloscope trace below you can see that it is generating less than 12V with 1 ohm load so wouldn't be able to charge a battery. This may of course be a bad one and I am looking for another stator of the same type to test. However the three phases were evenly matched so I don't think it is bad.

For info with a standard multimeter (not true RMS) I measured 41.2V AC with no load and 6.8V AC with a 1 ohm load at about 2800RPM.





Derry.

1969 T100S under reconstruction
GSX-R750K2 (having been rebuilt from a crashed wreck)
#242866 - 03/13/09 11:05 pm Re: Measuring alternator output - T140 [Re: Derry Hincks]  
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 265
Duke Of Oil Offline
BritBike Forum member
Duke Of Oil  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 265
The Beach, California
Derry,

You are not simply measuring 7.178 Volts, you are measuring 7.178 Amps (remember the resistor is set up as a “current sense” device and when the resistor is in place as a load, you are measuring the voltage “drop” across the resistor. Also, your displayed waveform is for a single phase… a 3 phase waveform will be of three separate sine waves phased at 120 degree intervals. If you take the RMS value of the summed current (amps) waveforms, you will find that the result will surprise you.

For an RM24 3 phase Lucas Alternator (Star configuration) with a 1.0 Ohm 100 W sense resistor (load) across any two terminals, the voltage should measure a minimum of 4.5V (Amps) at 1,000 RPM or 6.5 V (Amps) at 5,000 RPM. The manual calls for a minimum of 6.0 Volts (Amps) at 2,000 RPM. Keep in mind that output is also dependent on the level of magnetization in the rotor.

Don

#242965 - 03/14/09 12:01 pm Re: Measuring alternator output - T140 [Re: Duke Of Oil]  
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Derry Hincks Offline
BritBike Forum member
Derry Hincks  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Bordon, England
Don thanks for that. There must be a formula for calculating what the alternator output (summed) is, any ideas? Trouble is of course the calculation will presume sine waves.

Compared to the figures you give for a RM24 my alternator looks quite healthy but ... it still doesn't produce enough voltage to charge a battery.

I agree about the rotor and I now have two to choose from. Doing a quick test my T100S rotor produced 116V pk-pk and the T140 rotor 128V (both rotors had the same part number). I have just received another T140 stator and rotor so will make some measurements for comparison.

I have been toying with making measurements after the rectifier to balance the comparison between single and three phase alternators. Any thoughts?


Derry.

1969 T100S under reconstruction
GSX-R750K2 (having been rebuilt from a crashed wreck)
#242972 - 03/14/09 1:00 pm Re: Measuring alternator output - T140 [Re: Derry Hincks]  
Joined: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,654
Dick Harris Online content
BritBike Forum member
Dick Harris  Online Content
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,654
East Bethany New York
golly,gosh guys.Just pust your 1 ohm resistor accross the output from the alternator and measure the output in AC volts.It should be at least 8.5 AC volts!! If you get that and you're still not keeping the battery charged,check the rectifier. It really is'nt rocket science. Dick

#243017 - 03/14/09 5:04 pm Re: Measuring alternator output - T140 [Re: Dick Harris]  
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Derry Hincks Offline
BritBike Forum member
Derry Hincks  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Bordon, England
<It really is'nt rocket science>
True Dick, so what have I missed do you think?


Derry.

1969 T100S under reconstruction
GSX-R750K2 (having been rebuilt from a crashed wreck)
#243061 - 03/14/09 9:34 pm Re: Measuring alternator output - T140 [Re: Derry Hincks]  
Joined: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,654
Dick Harris Online content
BritBike Forum member
Dick Harris  Online Content
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,654
East Bethany New York
Not a thing!! and then some. Dick

#243072 - 03/14/09 10:20 pm Re: Measuring alternator output - T140 [Re: Dick Harris]  
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 804
andrewinpopayan Offline
BritBike Forum member
andrewinpopayan  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 804
Halifax, Butt end of Europe
3 phase bridge

Hi again Derry, nice to see you carrying on experimenting. I posted a link for 3 phase epoxy block rectifier(not cheap!), maybe you should set up an ammeter in series with the load, the load could be 2 or 3 headlight bulbs with both filaments conected and use the scope as a voltmeter?

If anyone hs a knac*ered rotor, I wouldn't mind it. I would turn the cheeks off it in the lathe and see how it's constructed. Imagine a rotor made up with the new technology "rare earth" magnets?

Last edited by andrewinpopayan; 03/14/09 10:59 pm.

99% of carb problems are electrical.

1959 3TA

BMW R1150 Oilhead
#243092 - 03/15/09 12:00 am Re: Measuring alternator output - T140 [Re: andrewinpopayan]  
Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 9,964
John Healy Online content
John Healy  Online Content


Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 9,964
Boston, Massachusetts
The construction of the rotor consists of a round bar of steel that mounts it to the crankshaft. There are six flats machined in the middle of the bar where six 3/4" square (approx.) magnets sit. Other than the cast zinc there is nothing that holds the magnets in place.

Visable from the outside are a series of six packs of stacked sheet metal which have a hook that helps retain them in the cast zinc. If you choose to machine a part of the rotor away to take a closer look, be careful as you get close to the magnets. The cutting tool will garb one and it can quickly become a projectile.
John

Last edited by John Healy; 03/15/09 12:01 am.

#243097 - 03/15/09 1:04 am Re: Measuring alternator output - T140 [Re: John Healy]  
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 71
Mike, in Idaho Offline
BritBike Forum member
Mike, in Idaho  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 71
orofino Idaho
I'm sure all this stuff about a/c voltage levels and sine waves is interesting to some but, left to my own devices, I would just hook up a rectifier and battery to that bench rig so I could measure how many amps are being fed into the battery. If it does that adequately, I wouldn't care about the rest.


Mike

My company car is a Kenworth
#243113 - 03/15/09 3:04 am Re: Measuring alternator output - T140 [Re: Mike, in Idaho]  
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 265
Duke Of Oil Offline
BritBike Forum member
Duke Of Oil  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 265
The Beach, California
Derry,

Ah, ... the unexamined life. Everyone should let you do your thing because guessing/assuming/accepting isn't the only way to live. Sometimes, I like to know how my ale is made and what is in my Haggis. Have at it.

Not sure which Lucas alternator you are running or at what specific RPM you ran your plot.

For a 3 phase star configuration alternator, the phases are basically in series which means that the measured current from a single phase remains the same when combined for all phases, but the voltage is higher. The formula for a combined star configuration is to multiply the output voltage of a single phase by the square root of 3 (1.732). For a delta configuration, the reverse holds true. The voltage stays the same and the current is multiplied by the square root of 3. Lucas used the star configuration, despite advantages to the delta (wye) because it produces higher voltage at lower RPMs.. which is what you want for a bike.

Remember that measured output is load dependent. When you measure the open phase (no load) you have essentially high voltage at no current... no watts! Increase the load and the alternator will do more work requiring more power (mechanical) in. Any single measurement is, therefore, only a point on a continuous curve. You will have a new curve for each newly applied (different) load value across the RPM range. Right now, you are applying an arbitrary, but convenient, load of 1.0 Ohm. Convenient because there is a one to one correspondence of voltage measured across the resistor to actual current flowing in the circuit (Ohms law).

Measuring the ouput after the rectifier is exactly the same. Pay attention to the heat dissipation of your load if you are using it to also "sense" current. And, of course, set your meter (scope) to DC Volts.

Don

#243134 - 03/15/09 9:48 am Re: Measuring alternator output - T140 [Re: Dick Harris]  
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Derry Hincks Offline
BritBike Forum member
Derry Hincks  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Bordon, England
I have just tested a second T140 alternator (stator 47252 rotor 54212006) and this produced 42.2V AC no load and 7.1V AC with a 1 ohm load.


Derry.

1969 T100S under reconstruction
GSX-R750K2 (having been rebuilt from a crashed wreck)
#243151 - 03/15/09 1:22 pm Re: Measuring alternator output - T140 [Re: Derry Hincks]  
Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 9,964
John Healy Online content
John Healy  Online Content


Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 9,964
Boston, Massachusetts
The output of any combination of rotor and stator is going to be dependent on the strength of the rotor's magnetism for a given rpm. If you use a gauss meter you will find the strength of magnetism will vary greatly from rotor to rotor. I find that the new chinese and Lucas rotors to be about the same strength. So if you are going to perform any meaning full tests you probably should use one rotor as a standard and note its Gauss level and rpm the measurement was taken. I have also seen rotors where one or more of the magnetic segments provides a lower measurement than the others. This will also effect output. Used rotor readings vary a lot, and it doesn't always seem to be related to age.

If you do take a rotor to bits note that the flats of the hexigon where the six magnets sit will become a lever if the the center steel bar comes free from magnets and the zinc casting. At the end of each twist, too and fro, the lever action of the hexigon is trying to launch the magnet, and related bits, into orbit. Think about that when you are tempted to reach for the hammer and punch to try to lock a loose rotor.
John


#243175 - 03/15/09 5:09 pm Re: Measuring alternator output - T140 [Re: John Healy]  
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Derry Hincks Offline
BritBike Forum member
Derry Hincks  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Bordon, England
Generally what's the improvement in strength between new and old rotors John?

I compared each of my three rotors (all the same number 54212006) using my two-wire single phase stator (47205A) this afternoon. I measured 32.2V, 34.9V and 36.4V AC which is quite a variance.


Derry.

1969 T100S under reconstruction
GSX-R750K2 (having been rebuilt from a crashed wreck)
#243177 - 03/15/09 5:28 pm Re: Measuring alternator output - T140 [Re: Derry Hincks]  
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 265
Duke Of Oil Offline
BritBike Forum member
Duke Of Oil  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 265
The Beach, California
JH makes excellent points regarding segregating testing of componenets versus assemblies. To and fro alignment of the rotor within the stator may count as well.

JH wrote "This will also effect output. Used rotor readings vary a lot, and it doesn't always seem to be related to age."

I have always suspected that (aside from manufacturing variances) the levels of magnetization of rotors has more to do with how they are handled. Drop any permanent magnet (new or old) from chest height to a concrete floor (huge decelleration values) and the end result will be a loss of magnetism from the shock. And, of course, who can resist moving a permanent magnet toward a steel plate and watch it instantaneously SLAM into the plate. The geo-astrophysicists are having a field day with interpreting the effects of magnetization and de-magnetization that results from extra-terrestrial body impacts on earth rocks, and using that data to investigate strike sites.

Don

#243232 - 03/15/09 11:03 pm Re: Measuring alternator output - T140 [Re: Duke Of Oil]  
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Derry Hincks Offline
BritBike Forum member
Derry Hincks  Offline
BritBike Forum member

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 266
Bordon, England
<To and fro alignment of the rotor>
Not sure what you mean there Don, do you mean as it rotates?

<doesn't always seem to be related to age>
My three are dated 69, 79 and 79. The 69, from my bike, is the weakest.

I have also tested a RE Bullet four wire stator (two separate single-phase outputs). Interestingly one output that although it only produced 24/140V AC (meter/pk-pk) off-load produced a very healthy 9.4/40V on load.

This may be due to the fact that the stator has 31 laminations. (the 47205 has 16 and the 47252 has 18.) I don't yet know.


Derry.

1969 T100S under reconstruction
GSX-R750K2 (having been rebuilt from a crashed wreck)
#243242 - 03/15/09 11:51 pm Re: Measuring alternator output - T140 [Re: Derry Hincks]  
Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 9,964
John Healy Online content
John Healy  Online Content


Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 9,964
Boston, Massachusetts
In a post above it was asked how the rotors were constructed. To which I answered that the magnets sit on six flats machined on the center steel sleeve. They sit without any bond whatsoever on the steel shaft - they are not "welded" as some believe. Retention is provided entirely by the soft cast zinc that makes up the rotor.

It seemed to me to be relevant to mention that the flats act like levers when the steel sleeve comes loose from the main body of the rotor. Now once loose, the body of the rotor will snap "too and fro" from the effects of the pull of the magnets as they pass the stator poles and acceleration and deceleration of the engine. The result of this action is to lever the magnets away from the steel sleeve in a destructive manner.

Now as far as age of the rotor and the strength of the magnets, the windings of the stator can just as easily be made a de-magnitizer given the proper conditions. So age and miss-handling are not the only factors at play.


Page 2 of 5 1 2 3 4 5

Moderated by  Alan_nc 


Home | Sponsors | Newsletter | Regalia | Calendar | Bike Project | BritBike Museum | Spiders Cartoons | "OLD" BritBike Forum | DVD- Manuals & Parts books | BritBike Stickers & Decals
Upgrade to: Premium Membership | Premium Life Membership | Vendor Membership | Site Sponsor Membership
UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.0
Page Time: 0.080s Queries: 16 (0.007s) Memory: 1.0085 MB (Peak: 1.3671 MB) Zlib disabled. Server Time: 2017-11-20 20:46:43 UTC