Britbike forum

Wenco Frame Triple Racer

Posted By: DMadigan

Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 06/11/19 2:39 am

Trying to get my Wenco frame triple together for the Cachuma rally. I decided to mount the fairing slightly farther forward for more clearance with the clip-ons. Changing the previous oil cooler to the stock cooler mounted horizontally the way the letterbox was originally done. This will need some ducting changes to bring the air up through the cooler into the headlamp box and out the internal side to the ports on the fairing sides.
Another use for the 3D printer is making brackets for test mounting the fairing. Much cheaper and faster to print off something and find it does not work for some reason than making metal parts.
[Linked Image]
The lower bracket rails should be dropped a little so there is more room for the cooler hoses to pass through.
The cooler has to be mounted to the bracket so the fairing can be removed and the cooler left in place.
This upper cowl has the headlight pocket made by Starbiker, the rest they copied off Bob Bailey's bike that he claimed at Ontario. Airtech has these molds now.
The headlight will be LED auxiliary lights remounted on a thinner heat sink.
Since lithium batteries have gotten cheaper I am mounting one in the tail cone and adding an E-starter. Kick starting was possible but having to fold the peg, unfold the kickstart lever then bring your knee up to your chest in full leathers to kick was not a quick getaway procedure.
Posted By: koncretekid

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 06/11/19 11:24 am

At the latest "Old Bike Ride" in Colorado, there was a modern Triumph Thruxton with an earlier Triumph racing fairing. The brackets were a work of art made from 1/2" steel tubing which snaked its way down to the lower front down tubes. Additional special brackets were made to support the headlight. The owner told us of the many hours it took to fabricate them using the trial and error method. Your printer may be the answer to speed up the process.

Will the printer print smooth enough tubes to be used as velocity stacks? I can see starting with a stack of various sizes and shapes to try on a flow bench (of which I only have a crude homemade one), or actually on the dyno if the tubes would take the vibration of a big single.

Tom
Posted By: GrandPaul

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 06/11/19 3:08 pm

Originally Posted by koncretekid
Will the printer print smooth enough tubes to be used as velocity stacks? I can see starting with a stack of various sizes and shapes to try on a flow bench (of which I only have a crude homemade one), or actually on the dyno if the tubes would take the vibration of a big single.

Most printers, when the software settings are properly adjusted, can print quite smooth parts.

Also, if you use the correct media, it can make a permanent part, not just for testing!
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 06/11/19 3:26 pm

I already made a few velocity stacks shown here:
http://www.britbike.com/forums/ubbthreads.php/topics/754221/1
Using the right material, intake runners have been made. Of course if you have the right printer and deep pockets, SpaceX has been printing titanium and inconel parts for their rocket engines.
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/01/19 3:29 pm

Finally finished the magnesium front fairing mount.
[Linked Image]
I was going to make a digital version of a Smiths tachometer for it but time is of the essence. This is a Chinese "universal" gauge - tachometer, speedometer, high beam, running lights, turn signals, neutral, fuel gauge, gear indicator, low battery and odometer.
I will not be using a few such as gear indicator. There are only five gears. I think that I can remember which gear I am in. Besides, not accelerating hard enough, shift down. Hitting red line, shift up. Pretty simple really.
I do not have running lights or fuel gauge. I probably will add turn signals as it is rather difficult to raise your arm vertical when leaned over in a tuck.
I will use the neutral light for the shift warning. It likely will not be bright enough though.
As you can guess, the instructions are written in Chinglish - [Fleet blue] : right signal Positive polar connection. That means light blue wire, right turn signal, positive connection.
They use green wire for negative power, a red wire direct to positive battery (to maintain miles?) and a black wire for switched positive power (labelled "positive electric door lock connection".
It appears most of the people putting up videos are completely guessing on how to make it work. The link to a youtube video is completely useless. The guy is totally clueless.
The connectors are fairly universal Japanese motorcycle items. The fuel gauge requires a variable resistor to battery minus between 3 and 85 ohms. Less than 3 ohms or more than 85 ohms makes the fuel gauge flash as if it is empty with the default setting of 3. I have not investigated the other modes since I am not using it.
The speedometer uses a hall effect pickup with settings of 1-12. They supply 3 magnets and suggest using 2. People in the videos are completely confused on setting the tyre circumference. It is the same as used on bicycles, mark the ground and tyre, roll until the mark is pointing at the ground again, measure the distance in millimeters and input that number.
They refer to engine RPM as "Tire rotating speed setting" although the previous instruction ends with "then enter into the cylinder number setting area" after saving the magnet setting.It does not mention how many settings there are for the number of cylinders but since the ignition gives one pulse per two revolutions a single cylinder setting should work. I will work it out with a pulse generator first.
The last setting is "the mileage cleared setting". It says "It could be cleared 200km once, 3 times in total. (Enter into this area again to clear more)". I will have to work this out with the pulse generator to see what that means.
The battery icon flashes below a set voltage. I did not measure it but probably around 12-12.5 volts.
The speed/mileage units can be changed between metric and foot-and-finger.
Posted By: R Moulding

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/02/19 7:03 am


Just tried to read that after three ciders and a drop or two of shine, need to lay down now.

Rod
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/03/19 3:26 am

Here is the gauge lit up.
[Linked Image]
Grounding each of the gear wires lights up the number although you cannot ground two gear wires to confuse the display (3 & 1 does not display 8). You can have Neutral and a gear number though.
Fuel is showing one bar from empty. When the last bar goes out the fuel display flashes.
The low battery icon flashes when the voltage drops below twelve volts.
The Hall speed pickup is supplied with 7.5 volts. The magnets have a red mark on one side. This has to face away from the pickup or the sensor will not work. This is not mentioned in the instructions.
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/03/19 3:28 am

I finished the new rockerfeed with AN06 ends.
[Linked Image]
Posted By: GrandPaul

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/03/19 3:33 am

Don't forget to tighten down that headbolt!
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/03/19 4:37 am

The engine still needs all its guts put back in.
Posted By: koncretekid

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/03/19 11:32 am

How are the fairing/gauge/headlight mounting bracket fastened at the steering frame tube? I have made a crude one for my Bridgestone that bolts on with U-bolts which works but is not great looking. Here you can see the bracket U-bolted back onto the steering head:
[Linked Image]
Tom
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/03/19 3:26 pm

Two 1/2" tubes are welded across the front of the headstock. Typically telescoping tubes welded to a plate is used to adjust the fairing fore/back.
Posted By: J. Charles Smith

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/04/19 7:45 pm

I wish I could afford a Motogadget, but I can't, so I'd love to know the brand name of your speedo/tach. Thanks, Dave.
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/05/19 1:45 am

This one is made by Wupp. Bought it through AliExpress. Here is the official Wupp store:
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32953485118.html?spm=a2g0o.productlist.0.0.68c44cecxcitc2&algo_pvid=7604bd8f-9508-44e0-ac59-9e846927d3cd&algo_expid=7604bd8f-9508-44e0-ac59-9e846927d3cd-1&btsid=52bca646-acc8-4f34-9edd-b3cb05142de2&ws_ab_test=searchweb0_0,searchweb201602_2,searchweb201603_52
Or search for "Universal Motorcycle Tachometer Wupp"
Prices are all over but be sure it includes the Hall speedometer pickup.
Posted By: old mule

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/05/19 1:02 pm

Keep us updated on this interesting bike, please.
Posted By: J. Charles Smith

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/05/19 6:02 pm

Thanks!
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/13/19 7:45 pm

Tried two other engine oil unions besides my original to get the AN06 hoses located around the wire hoop which kept the original rubber hoses away from the exhaust. Turns out the original was best with the feed hose going through the hoop and the return around the outside.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
The oil union might interfere with the oil pressure switch (for some reason the T150 and R3 switch locations differ). In that case I will block this one off and use one of my ported oil filter caps for the switch. Later I might add my multi-coloured oil light but for now I will use the marker lamp light in the speedo-tach.
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/16/19 10:13 pm

Think you have your cases clean?
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Try spraying on WD-40 and use a nylon brush in a rotary tool:
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Possibly you can see the bright rings around the bolt holes in the centre case:
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
That is from the scraper indicating the metal was pulled a bit. These have to be removed so they do not interfere with mating the case parts.
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/17/19 2:31 am

One of the high gear seal housing screws was stripped. I put in a Time-sert. I used the seal holder to find centre, then drilled, chamfered, tapped and installed the Time-sert on the mill.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
The screw is a half height hex socket head (Allen). I will get stainless screws for the final build.
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/17/19 3:30 am

Installed the crank bearings and high gear bearing. Cases in the oven at 250F and bearings in the freezer.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
If the bearing does not start straight, knock it out and start again. Do not try to knock the bearing straight in the bore. It will gouge metal out of the bearing hole.
Packaging tape covers the bearings until ready to assemble.
Posted By: old mule

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/18/19 3:58 pm

Thank you - more, please.
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/19/19 4:15 pm

Using the GS650 ND three phase generator but will change the mount for the GSXR600. The rotor weight of the ND is 44 oz versus 26.5 oz for the GSXR. The GSXR rotor is one piece whereas the GS is thicker casing with the centre riveted on.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Yes, will have to reroute the wires elsewhere.
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/21/19 4:33 am

The crank was set in the middle case and the caps torqued.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Old socks are good for protecting the rods and pistons.
I put the crank and centre case up on end using a piece of large tubing and plate so the crank sits on the web for assembling the end cases. It makes it easy to drop the case down on the centre section.
Notice I used a spacer on the bolt that goes through the inner primary to keep the clamping even.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
I used Loctite 574. This is what Porsche uses on the 911 cases. Being an anaerobic sealer it allows all the time you need to assemble the cases. Everything should turn freely at this point.
The inner gearbox case already had the dowels so I removed them from the main case. Insert a 1/4" rod into the dowel and use a pair of mole grips to twist them out.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
I had two choices for the camplate, the full round and the truncated plate. The truncated plate can be inserted with the high gear in place. The round plate must go in before the high gear. The truncated plate edge looks like it was cut on a band saw, very rough wavy marks across the plate. This will make shifting rough as the plunger moves across the ridges.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
I found another problem with the truncated plate, it will not turn the full range of the detents. Either the stop is too large a radius or they notched the case on later engines.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Not having used these cases before I checked the end float of the layshaft and found it was bound. The bearing in the drive side was not set into the cases far enough and the layshaft high gear hit the bearing before the thrust washer. There was a gasket between the inner case and centre section which probably made it work. I used the factory drift to set the bearing depth. With the inner case mounted I checked the end float with a dial indicator, using a magnet wand to pull/push the shaft.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
When installing the high gear it is a little difficult to get the rollers on to the shoulder. I made a sleeve (1.558" O.D. x 1.502" I.D.) with a 10 degree chamfer on the end. This is inserted into the roller bearing from the outside and the high gear is slipped in, replacing the sleeve.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
I find it difficult to juggle two shafts and three forks all at once. I put in the mainshaft first with the camplate in 5th.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Then wiggle in the layshaft with the forks sitting high to the fork shaft position, then move the gears around until the pins of the forks drop into the tracks. While you are doing this the mainshaft fork will probably fall out of the track. You have to reach in under the forks and lift it up into place. When all the fork pins are in the camplate, slide the fork shaft through. On the early engines the fork shaft is stepped and the hole goes through the drive side case. Put sealer on the stepped end of the fork shaft before installing.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
When installing the inner gearbox case the dowels would not align with the holes. This was due to the two studs being slightly bent. I used two long bolts with spacers to mount the inner case. I will probably cut off the head of the bolts and thread them to make studs. Faster than ordering new ones.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
With the camplate plunger out it is easy to go through the gears and check the operation.
I previously modified the shift lever shaft to use needle bearings in the inner and outer gearbox covers.
I made a roller plunger for the camplate and will try it in this.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/23/19 4:59 am

At some point the diameter of the seal surface on the gearbox sprocket changed. The early (right) sprocket seal diameter was 1.770". The later (left) sprocket seal diameter is 1.858". Same 2.375" O.D. on both seals. The early seal (National 473237) was double lipped, later single lip.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Waiting for a gearbox sprocket to finish the inner primary so preparing the cylinder. The tappets had some light scoring. Dressing on a Scotchbright disc cleaned up the surface.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Posted By: kommando

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/23/19 11:05 am

If I had the choice I would go double lipped seal, the outer one acts as a grit shield at the expense of drag but the inner seal will last longer.
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/23/19 2:50 pm

With all the dirt a chain carries with it a double lip seal is much better.
I have not been able to find a number for the larger I.D. seal. The one that I have has half the numbering rubbed off but looks to be MN23718525. I could not find a match for that number or partial match. The seals in that shaft size are either 1.844" (1-27/32) or 47mm. none are available with the 2.375" housing diameter.
If the seal coming with the sprocket is single lip I will probably order a National 47x60x8 seal which is double lip and make a new housing.
It is not clear why Triumph decided to make the seal surface diameter larger. The diameter of the sprocket that guides against the rollers is the same size (1.624"). However you would think they would have chosen a common seal.
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/25/19 2:42 am

Found another problem with the cases. One of the cylinder studs was a little higher than the rest so I was winding it down and decided to back it out and put blue Loctite on the threads.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Looks as though someone had a leak and decided to fix it the usual way, get out the 1/2" breaker bar and tighten it down.
I had to order a 3/8-16 Time-Sert kit as all the local places only carry Heli-coil type "fixes".
So I guess it is on to the head whilst I wait for parts.
I also ordered 47x60x8 double lip seals for the high gear. I expect the seal that British cycle suppliers have are single lip.
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/27/19 4:41 pm

I left the engine in the stand to mount it on the mill, easier to set the deck square. Fixed the pulled stud with the Time-sert.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
The cylinder flange was prepared with the Loctite. The stippling was from dabbing with my finger tip. Makes it easy to see the coverage. The piston skirts and cam lobes are given a coat of EP Moly grease and the bottom finger depth of the sleeves are coated with oil.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
The crank is rotated until the outer two pistons could be set on aluminum blocks. This keeps them square whilst setting the cylinder over them.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
The cylinder is slid down to the bottom of the wrist pin. Rotating the cylinder slightly around the vertical axis helps.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
At this point the ring compressors can be taken off and one put on the centre piston.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Once the sleeve is down over the centre piston rings the ring band can be taken off. At this point the main case can be given one last cleaning and the cylinder flange sealer can be checked.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
I prefer stainless NAS washers under the cylinder nuts.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
The washers and nuts on before the cylinder is fully seated since the four sleeved studs generally keep the cylinder from dropping right down to the case. Evenly turn the nuts to bring the cylinder down then torque the nuts starting from the centre nuts to the outside.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
On the Wenco frame the engine has to be installed without the head so at this point I am waiting for the gearbox sprocket so I can finish the drive side through the inner primary case.
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/28/19 9:52 pm

Timing the cams requires a 360 degree wheel if you are not using the wheel markings. The Triumph timing disk only has a +/-60 degree range. Eons ago I printed a 360 disk when dot matrix printers were in vogue and glued it on the back. Now many use an old CD and glue the laser printed scale on that.
The disk has to mount on the crank so a bushing was made. A 1/4" screw with spacer and washer works for the pointer. A steel plate was mounted on top of the pillar bolts for the magnetic dial gauge. TDC of the timing side piston was found by measuring the piston displacement equally on each side of TDC, noting the wheel markings and splitting the difference.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
A long dial gauge reached down to the tappet. If one is not available a short gauge and pushrod can be used.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Cam timing is 50 BTDC/64 ABDC intake, 67 BBDC/47 ATDC exhaust which gives lobe centres of 97 ATDC intake, 80 ABDC exhaust. If the marks are visible on the gears they can be used as a starting point, otherwise it has to be done using the dial gauge and degree wheel.
The crank is set at the lobe centre angle then the cam rotated to its peak. The cam gear is installed enough to engage the key. The engine is rotated backward so the dial drops below about 0.020" then the crank turned forward to that point. The angle is noted on the wheel then the crank is turned forward until the dial drops the same amount on the other side of the peak. If you overshoot you have to back up and try again. You cannot back up to the mark.
From these two measurements you have the lobe centre relative to the crank and can calculate how much to rotate the cam gear. The gear has 50 teeth so each tooth is 360/50 = 7.2 degrees cam, 3.6 degrees crank. The keyways divide this further to 1.2 degrees crank.
Similarly, the exhaust cam is dialed in.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Once the timing is set the cam nuts are torqued. A spare crank gear can be used to lock the gears.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 08/31/19 6:55 am

Made all the pieces to fit the GSXR600 generator. The mount was profiled on the lathe then sectioned on the mill.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Here is the stator mounted:
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
The rotor bore needs to be opened to 0.752" and a new keyway cut for the 5/32" key. A tapered plug holds the rotor against a new spacer.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
An Allen bolt replaces the crank stud. Here is the complete unit installed:
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
As I suspected, the seal supplied with the new sprocket is a single lip. The gearbox sprocket should really have a double lip seal to keep dirt out of the bearing. I made a new seal holder for the 47x60x8mm double lip seal:
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Here it is installed on the case:
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
I used half height Allen screws instead of the original slotted screws.
Posted By: Mark Parker

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 09/01/19 2:38 pm

Fitting the cylinder to a 90degree A65 is easily and quickly done on your own with the engine tipped onto it's nose and secured, with the pistons partially in the bores, the cyl on a suitable piece of wood, then it can have the rods lined up, pins and circlips fitted and sealant applied and slid on. The cam followers even stay in place without clips.
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 09/02/19 3:03 pm

I removed the seal plug from the stator wires and put heat shrink tube over the end of the sleeve covering the solid/stranded wire connections then heat shrink over that up to the case ferrule. The whole stator/wire assembly had to be rotated to screw the ferrule into the case but this is probably a better seal than the rubber boot over the ferrule.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
After tightening the rotor down I found there was not sufficient clearance between the tips of the stator and the rotor side so I had to make a longer spacer. The problem with that was the crank key was not long enough to engage the rotor keyway so I had to cut a second keyway in the spacer to connect the spacer and rotor.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Found a problem with the Emgo sprocket, it fit on the later 4372 high gear that I used to narrow it on the lathe but not the earlier Hoffman bearing high gear in the gearbox. A small difference in the width of the splines.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
I did not think it was going to take half a day to fix the sprocket splines. I used a dry erase marker to see where the interference was. It was more visible than bluing.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
I used a cotton swab to put a thin smear of moly grease in to lip of the high gear and clutch housing seals so they would not run dry.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
The new starter clutch housing was installed. I have an earlier version of my twin plate clutch with more metal removed around the basket perimeter so I used that with the Barnett carbon friction and steel plates.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 09/04/19 1:45 am

Added the rest of the inner primary bits on so now it can be mounted in the frame.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 09/10/19 5:59 pm

I use an engine hoist to put the motor in the frame. Bring it in from the side then add a strap inside the frame rail and remove the outside strap. Continue to the other strap and do the same.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Once the motor is in it can be positioned to fit the motor bolts. I put the bottom bolt in first, then the motor can be rotated to put in the rest.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
I made a mount for the return filter that fits inside the right rear motor plate. Simplest in line with the hose routing from the motor to the rockerbox feed.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
The head uses pillar bolts on all locations. The exhaust pushrod tubes have to be in place before the head is fully set down because the cutout in the cylinder is different between exhaust and intake sides.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
The pushrod tubes are adjusted for 0.020" clearance with only the top square o-ring installed.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Once the pushrod tubes are adjusted the bottom o-rings can be placed over the tappet blocks. I use Loctite 515 on the square top and the two bottom o-rings to help them seat. A dab of grease on the ball end of the pushrods helps keep them in the tappet socket.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
The valve adjusters are backed off and the rockerboxes set down. A magnet on a screw driver is used to pull the pushrods in place under the pin.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
The adjusters are turned down enough to hold the pushrods on the pins as the rockerbox bolts are tightened.
A dental mirror can be used to check the pushrods are in place.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
I tighten the four 5/16" bolts evenly until the rockerbox just contacts the head. The valve screws have to be turned out as the bolts are tightened since they were screwed down previously to hold the pushrods.
I replace the three socket head screws at the lip of the rockerbox with button head screws which have about 75% more area under the head. Sealer is used under the heads of these screws to keep oil from going down the threads.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
With the electric start and no kick lever, the valves have to be adjusted by turning the crank with the sprocket nut or the rear wheel in high gear.
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 09/11/19 5:11 pm

Early and late valve covers:
[Linked Image from jubilee-live.flickr.com]
They added the rib at the socket bolts because people were cracking them there. Still happens with the later covers because trying to seal a copper washer, especially a non-anealed one, takes a lot of pressure. People are happy to continue cranking down on things until they stop leaking.
I counterbore the sockets bolts for an o-ring. I also round off the dagger points on the top edge of the cover.
[Linked Image from jubilee-live.flickr.com]
Posted By: Adam M.

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 09/12/19 2:30 pm

I found out in real life 180W Lucas type alternator gives enough juice to forget about any problems with lights, even in my situation with lights on all the time during riding + using blinkers and stop light. Battery is always charged full and I'm happy.
Could be another story with electric starter and bigger battery. Anyway my red warning light ( aftermarket ) goes off a tad above 1000 rpm idle. I also have some questions:
- how did you finished your cylinder deck under head gasket, flat or with cylinder sleeves protruding ?
- what cylinder gasket did you use?
- did you dowelled your rocker boxes in this engine?
- did you use any rocker box gaskets?
Thank you.
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 09/13/19 3:54 pm

Yes, a 180W Lucas generator would supply plenty of power however, this originally had a 120W single phase. A new GSXR costs $25 and a used rotor was around $50 on Ebay. Far cheaper than a Lucas. It would need a three phase regulator in either case and these can also be picked up cheap.
I did not have to finish the cylinder/head joint but the liners are slightly high of the cylinder by around 0.002"
Cylinder gasket - base none, head copper. The head gasket is the only one in the engine.
I previously tubular doweled the outer two 5/16" bolts on the rockerboxes. This is an HDA head. An AM head has less material around these bolts and the outer two 1/4" screws are usually used on those.
No rockerbox gaskets. I set up the valve geometry by adjusting the valve stem or pushrod length. Adding a metal gasket just gives another possible leak point.
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 09/17/19 5:36 am

Found the gearbox was locked up. Shifted fine before the outer cover was on. Taking it off I saw the problem, the camplate plunger housing was bound against the camplate. Somehow I picked up the wrong plunger body which has a longer end beyond the threads.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
The one on the left looks like the T4400 in the '73 T150 parts book. The right looks like the one in the '73 T140 parts book which has the same number. The gearbox parts are from the '72 A75 five speed but with the Triumph inner/outer gearbox cases. Decided to use the roller plunger that I made.
That solved, on to wiring. I found a cheap source for battery cables is the jumper cables from China(harbor)Freight. Twelve feet of 8ga. wire for $12. Crimped on copper lugs for the battery and starter.
[Linked Image from live.staticflickr.com]
Added heat shrink over the crimp end to avoid shorts. Wires go from the battery in the tail cone to the starter and solenoid.
Less of a deal was the starter relay from NAPA. I needed one with a mounting tab and five terminals so I could turn off the lights when starting. Found one in the book (web site was fairly useless as all relays are listed under starter relays until you select one and then it gives the usage) with terminals numbered, looks and priced like a Bosch but made in China. No time to shop around.
Posted By: MarksterTT

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 09/19/19 5:03 am

Hi David,
when you dressed your tappet faces, did you freehand it and what grade scotchbrite wheel were you using? Thanks, Mark
Posted By: DMadigan

Re: Wenco Frame Triple Racer - 09/19/19 5:26 am

The Scotchbright disc is not marked but I think it is a medium, whatever that means. It is mounted on a hook and loop disc on a grinder motor. Not the best way to do it (by hand) as keeping the face square to the shaft is hit and miss. I did not have time to make a proper radius diamond wheel grinder.
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