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RPM
RPM
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Thread Like Summary
Allan G, BSA_WM20, Gary E, Ignoramus, Jon W. Whitley, leon bee, NickL, ron herman, Shane in Oz, Tribsauk, wbabojo
Total Likes: 29
Original Post (Thread Starter)
#824925 09/26/2020 11:53 PM
by leon bee
leon bee
https://www.classic-british-motorcycles.com/bsa-a65.html

Who is this guy to write this cr*p about my bikes. Is he on britbike?
Liked Replies
#825009 Sep 27th a 06:40 PM
by Ignoramus
Ignoramus
Thing is if they are such a POS how come many are still going 50 plus years latter ?
3 members like this
#824937 Sep 27th a 12:39 AM
by DMadigan
DMadigan
"in 1966 BSA replaced the drive-side (left) caged ball main bearing to a roller race. This removed the positive location of the crankshaft, allowing it to wander from side to side, quickly wearing out the flimsy shims & thrust washer intended to cope with the situation. This usually lead to a spun timing-side main bush, cutting off the oil supply to the crankshaft completely" - well certainly does not appear to know much about the A65. The timing bush is two piece, pinned together and the inside flange has two flats that sit in notches in the case so it cannot lead to a "spun timing-side main bush".
"BELOW: This 1971 BSA A65 Lightning features the black frame. Note the Lightning was the twin-carb hotrod 650." - the picture clearly shows the single carb Thunderbolt.
"ABOVE: The 1971 BSA A65 Thunderbird was the single-carb roadster version." - that is the Lightning.
On the Racing page he has:
"This 1969 Triumph Trident T150 Road Racer was campaigned by the legendary Gene Romero (above)." - I am fairly certain Gene Romero was not riding a lowboy frame triple with alloy slider disc brakes in 1969. Especially one with a headlight and tail light. Maybe it was for Bol d'Or?
2 members like this
#824992 Sep 27th a 04:34 PM
by Randy Pigford
Randy Pigford
He can argue technical merits or lack thereof but he goes on and on about how ugly the unit construction A65s are! Personally, I love the looks of the bikes and their power egg engine!
2 members like this
#825047 Sep 28th a 03:49 AM
by BSA_WM20
BSA_WM20
When buying stuff off easy I always check out the "Other items"
If the vendor is selling everything from condomes to maternity bras then they get a broad berth because it is blinding obvious they have no idea about what they are selling ( or the condom customers would not be coming back for maternity bras )

When it comes to published material either in hard print or tortured electron the story is the same .
A web page covering veything that ever rode down the street is bound to be very poorley written unless there is a variety of authors and has taken years to be completed .

Think Roy Bacon or Peter Henshaw .
Cut and paste books loaded with wrong information & loaded opinion.

This tosser obviously has very small genetalia and in order to build up his self esteem decided to publish a lot of rubbish that he obviously nows absolutely nothing about in order tp make people talk about him .
HE is not alone on the web by any means .

The best thing you can do is remove any link to his web page ( including the one here ) and never mention him except by spoken word .
Eventually Google will loose him and he will fade into obsecurity where opinionated morons with massive egos and tiny brains belong .
Even better go to known good quality pages every day.
That pushes them up and sends poo down the toilet where it belongs
2 members like this
#825313 Oct 1st a 04:58 AM
by Boomer
Boomer
Originally Posted by Shane in Oz
Originally Posted by DJinCA
I also remember Gary's 3 '67 BSA's at the show being some of the stars. Beautifully restored East Coast and West Coast Hornets and a Wasp. If you were trying to collect good photos of classic Brits, why would you not take advantage of that opportunity?
I spent some time chatting to Gary and admiring his bikes at Petaluma. I don't know why anybody would have refused an offer like that.



Maybe they were blinded by the 14,000 watt light!


Bill B...
2 members like this
#825393 Oct 2nd a 07:29 AM
by Ignoramus
Ignoramus
Originally Posted by DavidP
Originally Posted by Ignoramus
Thing is if they are such a POS how come many are still going 50 plus years latter ?
Perhaps because their owners have access to top flight machine shops and can afford to correct the deficiencies of the original design. End-fed cranks, proper oil pumps, the things which BSA management failed to do.
I noticed the same errors in the post, the one thing he got right was the spectacular failures of management. He didn't even mention the gold Daimlers for the CEO and his wife.
Don't get me started on delaying production of the Trident until it was too late.

I do not have access to any "top flight machine shop" (what ever that is) probably because i dont like dealing with prima donnas ......who *ank on endlessly about line boring , but dont even know what the process is.. But hey 3 minutes on google and anyone knows as much about engineering as I do ....I must be a slow learner cause it took me 40 years in the trade whilst the "experts" master it on the internet. AND i sure as hell dont have endless $s to throw at theses bikes

I do not have an end feed conversion and i am still running points dang i also forgot to add an oil filter

i guess my bike is going to fly apart any second eh but having had it 49 years i guess i am stuck with the risk

The trade has become so dumbed down these days that "top flight" machine shops are a bit rare, modern motors have put them out of business with their phenomenal reliability

Im glad i remembered to do oil changes on my old dunga whist others were pulling themselves about line boring and end conversions

these bikes arnt the space shuttle ya know
2 members like this
#824983 Sep 27th a 02:48 PM
by Mr Mike
Mr Mike
Leon,
Not sure if the writer is a Forum member, but I think for the most part the article is factually fairly accurate. I think one bad decision after another led to BSA's failure. The motorcycle industry was going in a different direction in those days and BSA did not. Their sports car industry went in the same direction.
That never stopped me from liking BSA's, MG's and Austin Healy's and Jaguars.. I just liked them all, and learned how to fix what was wrong. Would love to have a Gold Star or a 100-6 Healy or a XK-120 Jag but I am now down to a single mototcycle to remind me of my love affair with these bikes. My B50 stays in the shed most of the time. I don't frequent the site much more but remember you well for your many posts. I have a few old sailboats I fixed up and spend many afternoons on the water rather than on a country road winding up my BSA.

Keep up the hobby! As long as you love'em, who cares.

Mr Mike
1 member likes this
#824990 Sep 27th a 04:21 PM
by Gary E
Gary E
I know who he is. I don't know if he is a forum member. He is a Triumph guy. Has also owned a Norton. Don't know if he ever owned a BSA. He has more recently faded from the vintage British bike scene. He is now more into promoting the buying and selling of mobile home/manufactured home parks.

When he was big into getting photos of every possible British machine (for his website) at the BSAOCNC's annual west coast British bike show and swap meet, I offered to walk each of my three bikes I had in the show that year to his photo setup so he could get the photos he wanted. He turned me down.

Another time I commented to him that he could say something positive or nice about BSA's. All I got from him was a blank look.
1 member likes this
#824998 Sep 27th a 05:10 PM
by slow learner
slow learner
I think the "power egg" concept was developed by a noted designer of the time (Lowey ?). He was into clean lines and simple shapes. I think it was also thought it would help with oil tightness. Obviously, the concept was not universally accepted. I have to admit I always liked the look of the A65 especially the flat-track bikes but I own an A10.
1 member likes this
#825042 Sep 28th a 02:02 AM
by DJinCA
DJinCA
Originally Posted by Gary E
I know who he is. I don't know if he is a forum member. He is a Triumph guy. Has also owned a Norton. Don't know if he ever owned a BSA. He has more recently faded from the vintage British bike scene. He is now more into promoting the buying and selling of mobile home/manufactured home parks.

When he was big into getting photos of every possible British machine (for his website) at the BSAOCNC's annual west coast British bike show and swap meet, I offered to walk each of my three bikes I had in the show that year to his photo setup so he could get the photos he wanted. He turned me down.

I know who he is too. In the time that I have known him, he has had a T140 that never seemed to be running and a Sportster. I didn't know that he had moved on to mobile home parks, but I am not too surprised. He is a bit of a self promoter, spamming the club mailing list with promotion of his site and wanted the Clubman Show database for his use after we shut down the show (politely declined)

I also remember Gary's 3 '67 BSA's at the show being some of the stars. Beautifully restored East Coast and West Coast Hornets and a Wasp. If you were trying to collect good photos of classic Brits, why would you not take advantage of that opportunity?

DJinCA
1 member likes this
#825087 Sep 28th a 06:52 PM
by tg4360
tg4360
Single carb, A65, "Thunderbird".

Just plain sloppy work of someone who really doesn't care.
1 member likes this
#825222 Sep 30th a 02:41 AM
by DavidP
DavidP
Originally Posted by Ignoramus
Thing is if they are such a POS how come many are still going 50 plus years latter ?
Perhaps because their owners have access to top flight machine shops and can afford to correct the deficiencies of the original design. End-fed cranks, proper oil pumps, the things which BSA management failed to do.
I noticed the same errors in the post, the one thing he got right was the spectacular failures of management. He didn't even mention the gold Daimlers for the CEO and his wife.
Don't get me started on delaying production of the Trident until it was too late.
1 member likes this
#825449 Oct 2nd a 06:18 PM
by Ignoramus
Ignoramus
Regarding the alloy oil pump , my 70 did have one of those when i wheeled it out of the show room in early 71 as proud as a peacock. Funny how i got a girlfriend very soon after i got the bike .......i think she liked all the chrome she could look at herself in

Anyway the alloy pump .....it let go in 2005? as a couple of those stupidly inadequate body screws stripped in service ..its failure DID NOT blow the motor AND it would have been repairable , but since i had brought a cast iron pump whilst visiting UK many years earlier i fitted that

SO the shi* metal ally pump actually lasted 35 years

To me the worst thing on the A65s etc. were those Smiths magnetic instruments I think im on my 3rd/4th speedo , but hey one got burnt so i can excuse that one now those instruments sure were a cost cutting measure compared to the chronometrics I have learned how to fix even those now but when i was a young fellow they were completely beyond me


BTW
top thread Leon Bee it has been a very interesting and entertaining one
1 member likes this
#825452 Oct 2nd a 06:49 PM
by leon bee
leon bee
Interesting responses, indeed, Ignoramus. I was just impressed by that guy's big flashy looking website, you know, as though he might know what he was talking about. Can't remember how I came across it, but a casual reader would infer these bikes were absolute junk. I've owned and ridden hard A65s since 1967. Three of them I have now I've owned or known since 1974.

I'm sure Trevor is right that it is not good to steer any hits to his website, but that will end soon I'm sure.
1 member likes this
#825402 Oct 2nd a 09:59 AM
by BSA_WM20
BSA_WM20
In general BSA's choice of materials was reasonably good.
A fine balance between cost & durability, weight & sturdiness, machine ability & precision


Every one who has never studied metallurgy is always over ready to criticisie & condem the use of zinc based pressure die casting alloys.
They seem to overlook that the EXAT SAME ALLOYS are in common use today for carburettor fuel injector pumps and a myriad of other critical items.

Yes there were better materials that could have been used but that goes for just about every item manufactured by man, unless it is designed to kill, maim or mutilate as many humans as possible in which case there are no rstriction on material costs so tripple vacuum melted titanium is fine.

Steel gears running in a zinc or aluminium casting have been used for oil pumps since the first mechanical gear oil pump.
The fact that after 50 years ( 80 for the early B & M series ) some are no longer servicabe is a simple fact of life, they have exceeded their planed service life, by several decades .
And the fact that after 50 years some are still running is a tribute to the original design & materials selection particularly considering the oil they pumped carried a high level of micro particles.

When it come to robustness of design, I am a testiment to just how well BSA's were made.
I cringe some time when remembering all of the horrid things I did to my first A 10 then there was the B40 I rode daily for 5 yeas with no cage left in the big end bearing. The 70 mile tip back home with on con rod on the A 10 locked solid on the crank , slowly smashing the barrels .
So I for one have great respect of the products of Small Heath .
What I do not have respect for is all the modern owners who will not ride their bikes because they klunk when you put them into gear of they leave 3 drops of oil after screaming 20 miles at 3 times the legal speed limit, ot they take 4 kicks to start or the hear a funny noise or ther is a ticking sound or,or,or,or,or,
any excust to rip the engine apart an not to ride the bike, just is case it might break done , as if that is the end of the earth .
1 member likes this
#825486 Oct 2nd a 11:38 PM
by Jon W. Whitley
Jon W. Whitley
Originally Posted by gavin eisler
@Hillbilly , the link and its opinions have nothing to do with CBS, its not CBS / kyles opinions that are being scrutinized.
Look at the link , its Classic british Motorcycles. NOT CBS. mods should sort this out and delete stuff.

I already differentiated between the two....WTF wasn't clear, over ?
1 member likes this
#825494 Oct 3rd a 12:31 AM
by leon bee
leon bee
My apologies to CBS for any misguided criticism I may have inadvertently instigated. The only similarities I see in their sites is the color red.

CBS is one of the emerging businesses that makes our lives a little easier. I've placed a number of small orders there and they get 100% positive feedback from me.
1 member likes this
#825541 Oct 3rd a 06:40 PM
by Ignoramus
Ignoramus
Originally Posted by Allan G
The lapping of the ball should be done on the iron pumps Mark, for the Mazak pumps you are supposed to tap the ball into the surface to address the face issue.

the best way to do that is with a form relived slot drill (ball nose), the diameter of the ball obviously, but that is a major shag around needing a mill ect ......just only a small radius is enough so you don't interfere with the already marginal gasket best not tried by the average Joe as if you get chattering on the cut you have realy ****ed it.....use real low speed and just a touch .......give the spring a little bit of a stretch and Robert is your fathers brother

if you really want to get carried away polish the radius with some of that diamond paste known only to toolmakers ,,,,,,,,,,,that will give you bragging rights at the blowhard contest ..........opps i meant club meetings
1 member likes this
#825554 Oct 3rd a 09:27 PM
by Shane in Oz
Shane in Oz
Originally Posted by BSA_WM20
"Poxy pot mets " Monkey metal" and other such descriptions of the Mazark (patent in those days ) range of high strength high precision zinc die casting alloys .
The secondary reason for picking these alloys rather than the higher strength aluminium was the technical difficulties in casting aluminium in very thin wall sections and keeping Hydrogen out of the molten metal, a problem that zinc also suffers from but to a much lower extent.
Bear in mind the BSA had been using Mazak-bodied geared oil pumps since at least the introduction of Val Page's M series singles in 1937, so were quite familiar with the technology and its characteristics. Like plain bearings, there should be no metal-to-metal contact during operation, so any wear will be due to contaminants in the oil.

Something which BSA didn't take into account with the twins (or probably didn't care about) was ham-fisted home mechanics over-tightening the retaining nuts and over-clamping the oil pump bodies onto gaskets installed onto poorly cleaned surfaces. This is a certain recipe for distortion, which is the main reported problem with the alloy oil pump bodies. This wasn't a problem with initial assembly because of the carefully calibrated wrists of the engine assemblers.

A similar problem exists with Amal Concentric carburettors, which is why John Healey and others fabricate straightening jigs for them.
1 member likes this
#825566 Oct 4th a 03:12 AM
by NickL
NickL
Well i used to quite often do the run from London to Leeds and Preston at 100mph on the motorways.
Most of my colleagues and myself did 24-30,000 miles a year as our car leases were 2 year 60k ones.
Here people tend to jump on planes to go places which i prefer but few of the guys i know do 40-50k KM's a year in a car.
90-100mph was the normal motorway speed in the 80-90's. I've never been able to do that here 100km/hr is so boring,
it's no wonder people go to sleep and it takes so long to get anywhere.
1 member likes this
#825578 Oct 4th a 09:19 AM
by BSA_WM20
BSA_WM20
Nick,
Yo need a pre WWII or C series where doing 100 Kph takes every bit of skill you can muster.
1 member likes this
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