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The first time I had a Triumph gearbox apart, I just stared at it in amazement for a few minutes. Then, I got out the shop manual and went thru the illustrations, hand-aligning the parts as appropriate for each gearchange.

This @Magnetoman 's transmission adds a layer or two more of wizardry.

The minds that came up with this stuff, many years ago in it's infancy, are amazing to me... I mean, the FIRST guys to come up with these ideas... Wow.

Last edited by GrandPaul; 11/20/20 2:36 am.

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Originally Posted by GrandPaul
The first time I had a Triumph gearbox apart, I just stared at it in amazement for a few minutes.
FYI, here's how the three-speed gearbox of my Ariel works:

[Linked Image]

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Very cool. Still, you aren't showing ALL of the gearchange monkey-motion that happens between your tow and the gears themselves!

Even on a 3-speed, it's ALMOST as complex!


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Originally Posted by GrandPaul
Even on a 3-speed, it's ALMOST as complex!
No, it's quite a bit simpler on a three speed since everything happens in a straight line without the need for cams to move the gears back and forth. Note in the following that the bottom and top pairs of mainshaft/layshaft gears are always meshed together and don't change position, and only the middle pair (also always meshed together) do move, in a linear fashion.

[Linked Image]

1st. The dogs on the bottom of the sliding gear on the mainshaft engages with dogs on the bottom gear.
N. The sliding gears are disengaged from everything
2nd. Slots in the "slug" attached to the top of the sliding gear on the layshaft engage with pins projecting from the top layshaft gear.
3rd. The sliding gear on the layshaft continues to engage with the pins while the dogs on the appendage connected to the sliding gear on the mainshaft engage with the dogs on the top gear.

Compare this with the drawing in my previous post to see how the power is transmitted in each gear.

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If you note the time of this reply, it's because I'm weirded out on pain drugs from the broken leg. I didn't look all that closely...


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Ooh, sorry to hear about your broken leg. Get well quickly.

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Originally Posted by GrandPaul
broken leg.
Ouch! I'm sorry to hear that. I hope the pain subsides before too long.

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After literally years in the making, the exhibition in Brisbane finally opened so there's time to get back into the garage.

Three ongoing Clipper projects have been waiting for quite a while for me to find the time to complete them: assemble the forks, assemble the gearbox, and finish the engine (specifically, install the piston). Today I did the forks.

As the first photograph shows, it requires steel balls to install a set of BSA forks, and luckily I have them.

[Linked Image]

Two special tools made this job a lot easier. Some years ago I made a special socket for the cylindrical "nut" that goes on the fork stem.

[Linked Image]

A thin strip of steel could be used to tighten and loosen that special nut, but the socket makes the job very much easier. Also making the job easier was the tool shown in one of the fork legs in the next photograph, that overcomes the spring to pull the leg up to where the top cap can finish the job.

[Linked Image]

Now that I'm on a roll again, next up is the gearbox. However, once I finish that I'll pause to rebuild NYBSAGUY's magneto and dyno, since they've been sitting on the shelf for, um, a few weeks. Presently the gearbox components are strewn across the workbench so I have to get it back together to free up the necessary space.

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Today, the gearbox. As the first photograph shows, the shelving units dedicated to metals storage is a perfect location for hanging the blueprint-size enlargements from the spares book.

[Linked Image]

What the diagram doesn't indicate is this type of gearbox came in several variations, at least two of which I have parts from.

I made the mistake, at least for the kind of riding I do, of installing scrambles gearing in my Catalina. After our 1200-mile cross-Texas run a few years ago I switched the engine and gearbox sprockets to much more rider friendly Clubman gearing. Even though I'm building this Clipper in off-road configuration, most of the riding its rigid frame will get will be on the road.

I had to sort through a large box of sprockets to find a 19T that would fit. I only have a few sprockets for M-type gearboxes and most of them are 16T. The next photograph is one that does fit, and shows what would seem to be a good design for a sprocket if there weren't an oil seal, which there is.

[Linked Image]

Special tools make life so much easier, and the next two photographs show the sockets I made for the gearbox sprocket nut on the outside and for holding the sleeve gear on the inside.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Next to the socket for the sleeve gear, mounted on a ¾" extension to fit inside the gearbox, is a sleeve gear to show what it mates to. The sleeve gear on the later gearboxes is completely different and requires a different socket.

I installed the sleeve gear and gearbox sprocket, and assembled the gearbox using pieces of 3"×5" card stock to simulate the thickness of the gasket (I only have one gasket and don't want to risk ruining it).

[Linked Image]

However, I wasn't happy with the operation of the gearbox. I don't know if the sluggishness is intrinsic to this type of gearbox, or if the mismatched components are causing issues. Anyway, because of this, I want to work on the gearbox some more before I close it up.

With the gearbox assembled, albeit temporarily, the workbench surface is now clean enough that I can pause to rebuild NYBSAGUY's Magdyno and finally send it and his now-tested oil pump back to him. Don't tell him, but I also will paint an iron B33 head silver and send that back as well, hoping he doesn't notice the difference between it and the Catalina head that I'll pretend is mine.

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MM,

Regarding the stem bearings and at the risk of inducing another modification detour.....

How are you resisting the urge to adapt some type of caged roller bearings (If it's even possible....)?

TG


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'78 XS750 Triple (Because I just can't get my hands on
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Originally Posted by tg4360
How are you resisting the urge to adapt some type of caged roller bearings
An improvement like that would be inconsistent with this parts bin build. OK, so is the Gold Star engine, but I couldn't resist that.

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Originally Posted by tg4360
How are you resisting the urge to adapt some type of caged roller bearings (If it's even possible....)?
For the record, yes it is possible, not that I am suggesting it be done to this bike. BSA used the same frame races for the M20, A10, A65, R3 and even in the unit singles. I discovered that little detail recently when I needed some OEM frame races for my '56 Gold Star. Peter Quick of BSA unit Singles had them. Same part number. An India made tapered roller kit for A10's and A65's is listed on eBay right now.

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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
Don't tell him, but I also will paint an iron B33 head silver and send that back as well, hoping he doesn't notice the difference between it and the Catalina head that I'll pretend is mine.
Heavy but not gold, unlike John Reed's doorstop.
https://nebogold.com/n-c-gold-rush

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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
...Don't tell him, but I also will paint an iron B33 head silver and send that back as well, hoping he doesn't notice the difference between it and the Catalina head that I'll pretend is mine.
Payback for that case of Yellow Tail labelled Petrus Pomerol.


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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
Originally Posted by tg4360
How are you resisting the urge to adapt some type of caged roller bearings
An improvement like that would be inconsistent with this parts bin build. OK, so is the Gold Star engine, but I couldn't resist that.

Heck.... I was figuring there might be an appropriate sized set of bearings lurking in the parts stash.... (Not that I'm instigating or anything...).


'68 B25 Starfire (single)
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a Rocket Three...)
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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
Originally Posted by tg4360
How are you resisting the urge to adapt some type of caged roller bearings
An improvement like that would be inconsistent with this parts bin build. OK, so is the Gold Star engine, but I couldn't resist that.

It would be an improvement as long as your tires, brakes, 5 angle valve job and riding skill can’t create the forces equal to Rossi on a GP bike. You can stick with the balls and claim you are ahead of the curve.

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Originally Posted by Hugh Jörgen
labelled Petrus Pomerol.
Damn, now you tell me. I misread the label and though it was Petronas so I poured it in the Catalina's oil tank. I did think it was odd, though, for Petronas to package their oil in bottles.

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Years ago I bought or made all of the special tools for a Trident that are listed or described in Triumph's literature. This includes Service Tool 61-6025, fork alignment gauge. I've aligned a few forks since making that gauge, but never actually used it because, well, I forgot I had it.

Today, when intending to open the "Lucas" drawer on one of the toolboxes to get some tools for working on NYBSAGUY's magdyno, I accidentally opened the "Trident" drawer just above it and discovered the alignment tool. Aha, the Clipper's forks provide the perfect opportunity to use that tool for the first time in the nearly 30 years since I made it!

[Linked Image]

Unfortunately, it turns out a BSA's lower fork legs are about 1½" shorter than a Trident's. Sigh...

Looking at the bright side, it only will take a few minutes on the mill to drill the half-dozen holes needed to modify it into a dual-use Trident/BSA fork alignment gauge. That quite possibly never will be used...

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The special tools and parts which have been completely forgotten about tend to be balanced out by the parts which are there "somewhere".

Or at least they were there somewhere until they were used on another project 10 years ago.

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Originally Posted by Shane in Oz
The special tools and parts which have been completely forgotten about tend to be balanced out by the parts which are there "somewhere".
It would be a very good idea if I went through all my special tools annually (or more often than that) to remind myself what I have, in the hopes I then remember for a while. I also "discovered" in that Trident drawer that I have a Venhill cable "bird's nesting" tool. Who knew I had that? (certainly not me). Also, every time I think to myself that I should make a special tool for a task, I should first look through my special tools because there's a very good chance I already made -- and forgot -- one (or two...).

Unsurprisingly, the 15-minute job to drill five holes in the new position took an hour, a fair amount of it in trying to remove two of the five 6-32 screws. One of them eventually came out but, only after twisting an Allen wrench by at least 180° (after regrinding its rounded tip twice). I gave up and drilled out the last one.

[Linked Image]

Close inspection of the bottom of the slider shows there's a gap, which means the fork tubes aren't perfectly parallel. However, it would have been a minor miracle had they been since all I've done so far is to draw the stanchions into the top yoke.

The important thing is that I now have the world's only Rapidly Reconfigurable Fork Alignment Tool (RRFAT)™ (pronounced arrr-fat, like a pirate). It's ready to put back in the drawer and promptly forget that I have it...

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Assuming the stanchions are true its fairly likely the RHS bottom yoke has been tweaked back, this will be a lot more obvious if you you use 2 foot long winding sticks ( parallel beams), put one across the stanchion just above the yoke and the other across the lower section of the sliders. Of course the fork shrouds will be in the way! If these are removed its a lot easier. Nice tool, never had one , its 2 sticks for me.
Its not far out , an old stanchion nipped in the lower yoke only RHS can be used to lever it straight, they bend fairly easily.


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Going through the tool drawers and bins once in a while is better than Christmas. Also a really good source of things that you can modify to make new tools. If you don’t know what it’s for, you may as well repurpose it (unless it looks like it took a month to make).

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Originally Posted by Cyborg
Going through the tool drawers and bins once in a while....... a really good source of things that you can modify to make new tools. If you don’t know what it’s for, you may as well repurpose it
I do that and I hate it. I always feel guilty. One for not remembering and two for repurposing the mystery tool. But once I've done it I'm ok again.

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CLICK HERE

@Magnetoman, I'll say no more...


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Originally Posted by GrandPaul
I'll say no more...
Nice try, fella, but that would represent significant mission creep, which I'm doing everything I can to avoid.

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