BritBike SponsorBritBike SponsorBritBike SponsorBritBike SponsorBritBike SponsorBritBike Sponsor SteadfastCyclesBritBike SponsorBritBike SponsorBritBike SponsorBritBike SponsorHepolite PistonsBritBike Sponsor
Upgrade to: Premium Membership | Gold Membership | Life Membership | Vendor Membership | Site Sponsor Membership
Welcome to BritBike Forum!
Member Spotlight
Servodyne
Servodyne
England
Posts: 134
Joined: August 2013
New BritBike book out!
ShoutChat
Comment Guidelines: Do post respectful and insightful comments. Don't flame, hate, spam.
Search eBay for motorcycle parts in following countries
Australia, Canada, France, Holland, Italy, United Kingdom, USA
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 47 of 49 1 2 45 46 47 48 49
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 607
Likes: 96
Britbike forum member
Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 607
Likes: 96
Whatever one of us blames in another, each one will find in his own heart.
- Seneca


1970 T120R - 'Anton'
1970 Commando - 'Bruno'
1967 T120R - 'Caesar'
1968 Lightning - 'Dora'
2 members like this: Magnetoman, NYBSAGUY
Support Your #1 BritBike Forum!

Check out British motorcycles for sale: British Motorcycles on e-Bay UK, British motorcycles on e-Bay North America
Joined: Nov 2016
Posts: 239
Likes: 34
N
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
N
Joined: Nov 2016
Posts: 239
Likes: 34
As if I have to persuade MMan that we can do anything better. Just a little better, not perfection.. No, he is way ahead of me on the Doing Better scale.

2 members like this: Magnetoman, Hugh Jörgen
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 199
Likes: 85
S
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
S
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 199
Likes: 85
Originally Posted by Magnetoman
should take less than a day in the garage to complete, but it might require a week or longer to piece together that day.
That's a strong double whammy! Basket case bikes and days always take more time. Not very motivating.......... but tidying usually helps me find some fresh momentum. Avoidant thoughts of painting the house help too.

Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
We had to be out of the house for two hours this morning because workers were here. That wasn't enough time to work on any of the three incomplete sub-projects mentioned in my last post, but it was enough time to make another special tool.

The nut used on M-type gearboxes not only has a slightly different thread diameter, it has a slightly different OD. As a result, the sprag socket I made quite a while ago for later gearboxes doesn't quite fit. So, I made one that does.

[Linked Image]

The above is a ¾"-drive socket, which allows the end of the shaft to pass far enough through it that a deep-drive sprag socket isn't necessary as long as an extension for the torque or impact wrench is added on. So, I added on a ½"-drive socket.

[Linked Image]

That's all the progress I'm likely to make on the Clipper this week. Back to dealing with Brisbane...

Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
No matter if I don't have any time, I already try to find a little time to make progress on projects. A few episodes back I made a special tool for the Clipper to torque the inaccessible 1/4W head fastener at the back of the engine, noting that later Gold Stars used a smaller 3/16W fastener. The 3/16W combination spanner I ordered to make the same tool for my DBD Gold Stars arrived today and, although it's not for a Clipper engine, I'm counting this as Clipper progress anyway.

The first photograph shows that the tool clears the Magdyno and engine case on the right side, and it also can be installed from the left side.

[Linked Image]

Further, it reaches the front fastener without interfering with the exhaust pipe. I didn't try for any specific length when I made these and they ended up 1" different.

[Linked Image]

I marked the lengths on them to save that effort on the rare times when I need these tools. With a "standard" 18" torque wrench the shorter and longer one multiply the torque by 19% and 25%, respectively, i.e. the torque wrench should be set for that much less than the required torque.

Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
I'm not sure if the following should count toward Clipper progress, but I'm counting it anyway.

I keep my derusting (Rusteco + molasses) and degreasing (Gunk + diesel) solutions in 5 gallon plastic buckets from one of the big box home improvement stores. Unfortunately, the UV of the desert sun causes them to crack after a year or two. Luckily, so far each time I've managed to catch this shortly after it happened, when the cracks were small and only a small amount of each had started oozing out. When that has happened in the past I immediately bought new buckets and placed the cracked old ones in the new ones. I didn't try pouring the solutions from the old to the new for fear the brittle plastic would crack further and go Exxon Valdez on me.

This time I'm trying something different. First, I painted the new buckets in the hopes the problem is primarily UV, not temperature. After thinking about it a bit more, I discovered McMaster-Carr has 6 gallon galvanized steel cans (of the same design as garbage cans used to be in the good old days) whose ID is large enough to accept the plastic buckets. The buckets arrived today.

[Linked Image]

So, now when the plastic inevitably cracks -- which will take longer than 2 years with the protective paint, I hope -- the leakage will be captured by the metal cans. Also, I'll place covers over the lids to keep the sun off them.

Also, my wife claims buckets of this type can leak so I'll seal the seams with some roofing tar I have.

Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,533
Likes: 78
S
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
S
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,533
Likes: 78
Rather than using a plastic bucket inside a stainless or galvanised rubbish bin, how about eliminating the middle man and buy a couple of stainless steel buckets from the camping goods or farm supply shop.

While checking online to see if steel buckets are still a thing, I found there's also the deluxe alternative of a bee-keeper's stainless steel honey settling tank.

2 members like this: NYBSAGUY, Magnetoman
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
Originally Posted by Shane in Oz
I found there's also the deluxe alternative of a bee-keeper's stainless steel honey settling tank.
Ignoring price, which I'm not sure I want to ignore, the advantage of the plastic buckets I'm using is they have o-ring sealed screw-on lids. Despite diesel being relatively volatile, the quantity of it hasn't noticeably fallen in the at least two years I've been using it outdoors in temperatures that are quite high (e.g. so far this year we've had more than 100 days above 100 oF). If someone can point me to o-ring sealed, 5 gal/20 l stainless tanks for less than, say, $50 ea. I would be grateful. Until then, plastic buckets sitting in galvanized pails will have to do.

Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 199
Likes: 85
S
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
S
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 199
Likes: 85
Originally Posted by Stuart Kirk
Originally Posted by Magnetoman
should take less than a day in the garage to complete, but it might require a week or longer to piece together that day.
.....tidying usually helps me find some fresh momentum......
Originally Posted by Magnetoman
I'm not sure if the following should count toward Clipper progress, but I'm counting it anyway.
I'd say that counts in the biggest possible way 'cause it helps clear the way, and recalibrates the mind so that more things can get done!!

.......But I better stop now before I start to sound a little manic......

1 member likes this: Magnetoman
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,533
Likes: 78
S
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
S
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,533
Likes: 78
Originally Posted by Magnetoman
[If someone can point me to o-ring sealed, 5 gal/20 l stainless tanks for less than, say, $50 ea. I would be grateful. Until then, plastic buckets sitting in galvanized pails will have to do.
The honey settling tanks seem to be a bit bigger.


This tank has a rolled top edge and a clamp-down lid, so should be able to be modified for a gasket of some sort. Diesel doesn't seem to escape from sealed containers quickly, even in Australia.

Apiary possibly isn't one of the larger industries in your area, so the local farm supply stores may not have honey settling tanks on the floor to check for suitability.

1 member likes this: Magnetoman
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
Originally Posted by Shane in Oz
The honey settling tanks seem to be a bit bigger.
I don't know about Australian jargon, but 'honey bucket' has a special meaning in American. It's not something you'd want to immerse BSA parts in (although, parts from a lesser marque...).

Thanks for pointing this out. Although I'm set for now, stainless tanks with clamp-on lids are something I'll look into the next time the plastic gives out.

For someone interested in their own, um, honey pots, I find the 5 gal. size filled with ~4 gal. of liquid handles most motorcycle tasks nicely. In a much earlier post, when I had to de-rust the inner gearbox assembly, the width of the buckets accommodated the inner gearbox housing while the height of the liquid was sufficient to completely immerse the shafts. Further, assuming ~8 lbs./gal. the ~35 lb. weight is easy to manage. While a 36 l container like in the link Shane posted would hold the same ~15 l of solution, the level would be only ~1/2 the height. Adding liquid to double the height would double the weight to a less manageable ~70 lbs.

The photograph shows the plastic buckets sitting in the steel ones with the lids in place to keep the sun off the (painted) plastic as well as keep water from being collected if it ever rains again here in the desert.

[Linked Image]

Even though I painted the plastic I ran a strip of duct tape around the exposed band between the pail and lid to make it 100% shielded from the sun. Now, the plastic just has to deal with the heat.

Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,533
Likes: 78
S
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
S
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,533
Likes: 78
Originally Posted by Magnetoman
Originally Posted by Shane in Oz
The honey settling tanks seem to be a bit bigger.
I don't know about Australian jargon, but 'honey bucket' has a special meaning in American. It's not something you'd want to immerse BSA parts in (although, parts from a lesser marque...).
It has a less savoury meaning here as well, which is probably why they're listed as "honey settling tanks" smile

1 member likes this: Magnetoman
Joined: May 2019
Posts: 505
Likes: 112
C
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
C
Joined: May 2019
Posts: 505
Likes: 112
[Linked Image]

Gotta say that photograph is very telling.

1 member likes this: Magnetoman
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 607
Likes: 96
Britbike forum member
Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 607
Likes: 96
How about one of the rubberized spray compounds e.g. Flex Seal?
Says it's UV stable, not much additional weight.
A belt, suspenders and elastic waistband solution.

Last edited by Hugh Jörgen; 10/15/20 11:07 am.

1970 T120R - 'Anton'
1970 Commando - 'Bruno'
1967 T120R - 'Caesar'
1968 Lightning - 'Dora'
1 member likes this: Magnetoman
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
Originally Posted by Hugh Jörgen
How about one of the rubberized spray compounds e.g. Flex Seal?
That's a good suggestion. Thanks. But, the seams at the bottom and side are short enough that roof sealer should be easy enough to apply with a brush. There's no hope of rain for a while so I haven't rushed to get that done.

Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,893
Likes: 69
Q
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Q
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,893
Likes: 69
a 5 gallon bucket could be well shaded
by a 10 gallon hat .

doesnt McMaster-Carr sell somberos ?

.

2 members like this: NYBSAGUY, Magnetoman
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
I had to be out of the house for two hours today while workers were here so I spent it in the garage. Although I remain bogged down with the Brisbane exhibition, this cockroach should have had a little more patience waiting for me to return to work on the Clipper.

[Linked Image]

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 5,541
Likes: 82
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 5,541
Likes: 82
The latest news on Cockroaches , they are like Bees, find the queen, they have a hive mind.


71 Devimead, John Hill, John Holmes A65 750
56 Norbsa 68 Longstroke A65
Cagiva Raptor 650
MZ TS 250
The poster formerly known as Pod
1 member likes this: Magnetoman
Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 1,433
Likes: 49
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 1,433
Likes: 49
Rumor has it that Cockroaches can survive radiation doses many times higher than us mere mortals. Maybe MM has a secret black supply of potent radioactive material he's going to use on the Clipper or other shadowy projects. Alternatly the Cockroach may have ingested a terminal dose of leaky molasses from the rust removing buckets or just died of old age whilst happily admiring the vast collection of bikes and specialised tools in MM;s workshop.

Last edited by gunner; 10/20/20 8:35 pm.

1968 A65 Firebird
1967 B44 Shooting Star
1972 Norton Commando
2 members like this: NYBSAGUY, Magnetoman
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 607
Likes: 96
Britbike forum member
Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 607
Likes: 96
Lockheed has it's Skunk Works®.
MM has his Roach Works®.


1970 T120R - 'Anton'
1970 Commando - 'Bruno'
1967 T120R - 'Caesar'
1968 Lightning - 'Dora'
2 members like this: NYBSAGUY, Magnetoman
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 646
Likes: 15
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 646
Likes: 15
He's not dead. He's just resting.


Coming to terms with your delusions, is the first step to sanity
2 members like this: Magnetoman, Hugh Jörgen
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
Originally Posted by BritTwit
He's not dead. He's just resting.
Are you talking about me, or the cockroach?

1 member likes this: Hugh Jörgen
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 5,541
Likes: 82
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 5,541
Likes: 82
Once you are finished being dead , get on with it, we roaches need progress


71 Devimead, John Hill, John Holmes A65 750
56 Norbsa 68 Longstroke A65
Cagiva Raptor 650
MZ TS 250
The poster formerly known as Pod
2 members like this: Magnetoman, NYBSAGUY
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
Originally Posted by gavin eisler
get on with it, we roaches need progress
My TIG has been operating on Ar fumes for a while so, since some of my welding has been for the Clipper, and there still might be more, I'm counting the fact I picked up a new tank of Ar from the welding shop today as moving the Clipper project forward.

As an aside, after five months of blissful sloth, I've been back with my personal trainer via Zoom twice a week for 2½ months. Without that I'm not sure I could have safely moved the gas bottles into and out of the back of the pickup. If nothing else ends it sooner, at some point in the future my career as a welder will come to an end when the Ar runs out and I can't lift the empty bottle into the truck to swap it for a full one.

Everything we know that we need to do for Brisbane is done, although small things keep coming up as the bikes arrive and are installed. Unfortunately, ten days ago I stupidly agreed to a new consulting job (nb. when someone would rather spend time, effort and money working on an obsolete old motorcycle that he in no way needs, than raking in easy cash, something is wrong), and I also have a Ph.D. dissertation to evaluate, so this weekend will be spent getting those two things out of the way (although, only temporarily for both). However, this means there's the very real danger that I'll get back to the Clipper quite soon.

Last edited by Magnetoman; 10/30/20 10:09 pm.
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
Britbike forum member
OP Online Content
Britbike forum member
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 6,460
Likes: 190
Looking back through this thread, it's been two months since I did anything serious on the Clipper. In a case like this, project notes come in very handy. In reviewing those notes I didn't find anything that indicated I had done a careful test of the gearbox, which is something I want to do before assembling it. All the better not to have to take it apart again after it's bolted into the frame. So, today I did that test.

The photograph shows the complexity of this gearbox, and gives some indication that I shouldn't expect feather-light shifts.

[Linked Image]

The upper two images show the relative positions of everything when in 1st gear, and the bottom two after having shifted into 2nd. Starting with the upper left image, the gear shift lever is not connected to the plate with teeth that's directly below it, but instead is connected to the 'pawl plate' below that one.

As the arrows indicate, when the gear shift lever is pressed down the shaft it's attached to rotates CW, which in turn rotates the 'pawl plate' to engage the upper pawl with the teeth on the plate above, rotating that plate and in doing so pulling the rod to the right. The rod is connected to an ear which in turn rotates a shaft. Note that the angle is much greater than 90° so the mechanical leverage is poor. Also note that the length of the rod is adjustable, so this careful check is needed to be sure it's at the right length for all the gears and shafts to be in the right positions in all four gears plus neutral.

Looking at the image directly to the right, the shaft that rotated as a result of the gear shift lever being pushed down can be seen to be geared to a second shaft, so that 'shifter shaft' rotates as well. Two projections on the 'shifter shaft' independently engage with the two shifter arms to move them according to the cams cut into the arms. The projection at the far end of the 'shifter shaft' simply travels along a straight section of its shifter arm when going from 1st to 2nd, requiring very little force. However, the projection at the near end of the shaft travels along a ~45° section of its shifter arm, requiring quite a bit of force to push the corresponding gear cluster due to the poor mechanical leverage.

I made sets of images in all four gears plus neutral and will upload them in the next day or two.

Page 47 of 49 1 2 45 46 47 48 49

Moderated by  Richrd 

Link Copied to Clipboard
BritBike SponsorBritBike SponsorBritBike Sponsor
Upgrade to: Premium Membership | Gold Membership | Life Membership | Vendor Membership | Site Sponsor Membership
Home | Sponsors, Newsletter | Regalia | Calendar | Bike Project | BritBike Museum | Spiders Cartoons, | DVD- Manuals & Parts books









Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5