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Looking for a rigid frame for my '70 A65L??
#818162 07/31/20 10:51 am
Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 11
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Hi all, just wondering if anyone has stuffed the running gear of a 1970 A65L into a rigid frame?
Any thoughts or advice/guidance on what frame can be used to achieve this?
Any particular things to keep in mind?
Any suggestions where I can start to look for such an item and what would/could be the model I should/could consider?
I'm in the UK so can buy here but the bike is currently in Canada so I'm open to searching for one either here or in N. America


I'm considering attempting my hand at building something along the lines of what is in the link (hope the link works).
https://www.facebook.com/relicmotor...096/1439123646270774/?type=3&theater

Thanks in advance
Mat

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Re: Looking for a rigid frame for my '70 A65L??
Mat & Ruby #818171 07/31/20 1:02 pm
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Have a look up of Peter Derks, I think he is on the Facebook bsa forum and might visit here also. He’s done a plunger A65, it’s a really sweet bike and it’s a bit trick also.


Now let’s all have a beer beerchug

68’ A65 Lightning “clubman”
71’ A65 823 Thunderbolt (undergoing restoration)
67’ D10 sportsman (undergoing restoration)
68’ D14 trials (undergoing transformation)

Re: Looking for a rigid frame for my '70 A65L??
Mat & Ruby #818381 08/02/20 3:32 am
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Can you spell degenerative disc disease? I can...

I usually keep my opinions to myself when someone talks about putting an A65 engine in a hardtail frame, but my back is particularly sore tonight, so I feel compelled to say "Don't do it; you'll regret it some day".

If you have to do it though, here are a few suggestions: 1. A springer works better with a rigid frame than a telescopic front end. 2. Most manufactured hardtail sections lengthen the frame by six inches and lower the rear by four inches. If you don't shorten the front end, it will throw off your steering geometry. 3. Note that early HD and Indian rigids placed the rider and foot controls well forward of the rear wheel, allowing the rider to take more advantage of the front suspension. Also, many seats were mounted such that the pivot point was well forward of the saddle, such that the entire saddle could move up and down, and not just the back of it. (Of course the ultimate in seat suspension was the "pogo stick" seat, where the entire seat could move straight up and down on a sprung vertical post.) With a Brit bike, the rider is very close to being right over the rear wheel, so if you're going to ride it on anything but the smoothest boulevards, it's a good idea to fit it with a 15 or 16-inch rear wheel with a big fat tire; this adds more than you might think in cushioning. When designing the seat, get the pivot point as far forward as possible on the frame, and install the longest springs you can manage, preferably progressive.

FWIW, the bobber in the picture looks pretty effective, except for the low profile rear tire and no-frills seat.

And remember, even if you manage to set it up such that the ride is bearable, every time you hit a bump, the entire bike is taking that shock, not just the rear wheel and swingarm.


Mark Z

'65(lower)/'66(upper, wheels, front end, controls)/'67(seat, exhaust, fuel tank, headlamp)/'70(frame) A65 Bitsa.
Re: Looking for a rigid frame for my '70 A65L??
Mat & Ruby #818399 08/02/20 10:43 am
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Hi Mark that is really very useful information. It will be nothing more than a toy to toodle about on once in a while.
Well noted on the pivot point for the seat and the tire size! And yes certainly a springer front end.
Looks over function just because I can at this stage in life. Besides a few other bikes in the barn keep my backside comfortable.

Cheers
Mat

Re: Looking for a rigid frame for my '70 A65L??
Mat & Ruby #818407 08/02/20 12:27 pm
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Lowbrow Customs in the US sell prefabricated weld on hard tails for a variety of bikes including Triumphs but not BSA, see This Link. Maybe they could make one for your A65 if you supply dimensions etc.

In the UK there are plenty of frame builders making custom frames, one example is Fenland Choppers see This Link


1968 A65 Firebird
1967 B44 Shooting Star
1972 Norton Commando
Re: Looking for a rigid frame for my '70 A65L??
Mat & Ruby #818419 08/02/20 2:22 pm
Joined: Jun 2020
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Build it right and a rigid can be a lot of fun. An appropriately sprung (and mounted) saddle makes all the difference.

My favorite machine to ride is my 1929 Indian Scout. It is light, handles beautifully and is surprisingly comfortable. It has a full leather saddle, but not a full saddle pan thus the leather is somewhat free to conform to the rider. Springing is adequate, and the pivot attachment point is key. If this is a loose fit, the saddle will feel quite detached from the machine. A solid fit and you feel well connected.


1970 Lightning
1968 Thunderbolt

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