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Re: Those new RE twins!
KC in S.B. #788931 11/02/19 6:55 pm
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...the ones that I remember with bad or wrong distribution of weight were the Benelli Tornado 650 (mid 70s) and the Universal (a BMW copy) from mid 50s
Too light on the rear making them to pretty bad handling bikes.

Dibnah; regarding those bloated bikes and those mud back roads. Still do not get it why all the new "adventure" bikes are too big? May be because the users are too tall?
A buddy here few years ago got trapped on a road like that with the gal as a pillion on a new BMW 1000RR...imagine that.

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Re: Those new RE twins!
Dibnah #788943 11/02/19 8:11 pm
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Originally Posted by Dibnah
There are back roads and there are back roads, good luck with getting a bloat-bike down something like this


It's a challenge on a my sub-400lbs TR6, a BSA Bantam would be a much better option, particulary when a large tractor appears on a blind corner, the only option being the ditch.

On a bloat-bike, how does the rider deal with front and / or rear wheel slides? Must be a struggle to boot it back up again, particularly if it has a bloatily high seat height.


Try it on this road...Looks like a 800 pound Harley... grin

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79 T140D, 96 900M Ducati ....On a bike you can out run the demons..
Re: Those new RE twins!
Hillbilly bike #788949 11/02/19 8:37 pm
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Originally Posted by Hillbilly bike


Try it on this road...Looks like a 800 pound Harley... grin

[Linked Image from horizonsunlimited.com]


At least the rider will have a soft landing. Is that you?

Re: Those new RE twins!
reverb #788952 11/02/19 9:11 pm
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Originally Posted by reverb
...the ones that I remember with bad or wrong distribution of weight were the Benelli Tornado 650 (mid 70s) and the Universal (a BMW copy) from mid 50s
Too light on the rear making them to pretty bad handling bikes.

Dibnah; regarding those bloated bikes and those mud back roads. Still do not get it why all the new "adventure" bikes are too big? May be because the users are too tall?
A buddy here few years ago got trapped on a road like that with the gal as a pillion on a new BMW 1000RR...imagine that.


Always useful to have a pillion for pushing duties when the going gets tough.

My personal bloat-bike (Triumph Sprint) has a turning circle that must be twice that of my sub-400lbs TR6.

Re: Those new RE twins!
Dibnah #789130 11/04/19 9:10 am
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Originally Posted by Dibnah
Originally Posted by reverb
...the ones that I remember with bad or wrong distribution of weight were the Benelli Tornado 650 (mid 70s) and the Universal (a BMW copy) from mid 50s
Too light on the rear making them to pretty bad handling bikes.

Dibnah; regarding those bloated bikes and those mud back roads. Still do not get it why all the new "adventure" bikes are too big? May be because the users are too tall?
A buddy here few years ago got trapped on a road like that with the gal as a pillion on a new BMW 1000RR...imagine that.


Always useful to have a pillion for pushing duties when the going gets tough.

My personal bloat-bike (Triumph Sprint) has a turning circle that must be twice that of my sub-400lbs TR6.

Mine is a Daytona 900. thumbsup It feels even bigger than the Sprint, it's taller anyway. I lost it on the snow (!) once and had to get help to pull it out of the hedge.
The older I get the more I'm in your camp Dibs, but pulling a 500 Triumph out of a hole isn't easy either. I used to think my cousin's XT600 was a manageable bike until I took it off road. I mean no road at all, just dirt and sand. Boy was it big all of a sudden! My point is, the Speed Twin is as nimble on the road as anything, but if you ditch it, you're going to struggle, as with almost anything bigger than a moped, and certainly your TR6.

SR

Re: Those new RE twins!
Stein Roger #789164 11/04/19 7:19 pm
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Originally Posted by Stein Roger
Originally Posted by Dibnah
Originally Posted by reverb
...the ones that I remember with bad or wrong distribution of weight were the Benelli Tornado 650 (mid 70s) and the Universal (a BMW copy) from mid 50s
Too light on the rear making them to pretty bad handling bikes.

Dibnah; regarding those bloated bikes and those mud back roads. Still do not get it why all the new "adventure" bikes are too big? May be because the users are too tall?
A buddy here few years ago got trapped on a road like that with the gal as a pillion on a new BMW 1000RR...imagine that.


Always useful to have a pillion for pushing duties when the going gets tough.

My personal bloat-bike (Triumph Sprint) has a turning circle that must be twice that of my sub-400lbs TR6.

Mine is a Daytona 900. thumbsup It feels even bigger than the Sprint, it's taller anyway. I lost it on the snow (!) once and had to get help to pull it out of the hedge.
The older I get the more I'm in your camp Dibs, but pulling a 500 Triumph out of a hole isn't easy either. I used to think my cousin's XT600 was a manageable bike until I took it off road. I mean no road at all, just dirt and sand. Boy was it big all of a sudden! My point is, the Speed Twin is as nimble on the road as anything, but if you ditch it, you're going to struggle, as with almost anything bigger than a moped, and certainly your TR6.

SR


In ye olden days, a Yamaha DT175 was regarded as a very good trail bike, it apparantly weighs less than 220lbs, I could probably drag that out of a ditch, even at my advanced years. I had a couple of DT250s, mainly for commuting through that London, the yellow DT250 threaded safely through and over various trees in the morning after the great storm of 1987. Yet more bikes I should have kept. XT500 was regarded as a bit of a porker when introduced as I recall, albeit usable on "fire roads".

My TR6 is controllable when slipping and sliding on mud, well so far anyway. Some brave souls race similar in pre-65 motocross in the UK https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v29SJQgVoS4

Re: Those new RE twins!
reverb #789476 11/08/19 2:24 am
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Originally Posted by reverb
...the ones that I remember with bad or wrong distribution of weight were the Benelli Tornado 650 (mid 70s) and the Universal (a BMW copy) from mid 50s
Too light on the rear making them to pretty bad handling bikes.

Hmmm. I spent three days riding a Benelli Tornado this summer and felt it was a decent handling and willing bike. The brakes were rubbish and kick starting it was nigh impossible but otherwise it was a nice machine. Felt light.

Re: Those new RE twins!
KC in S.B. #789495 11/08/19 1:14 pm
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Weight distribution can affect the way a bike feels.
A bike that carries its weight low down will feel lighter but will have sluggish handling and be reluctant to turn into a corner. Whereas a bike with a higher centre of gravity may feel heavier at standstill but will be more agile on the road


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Re: Those new RE twins!
KC in S.B. #789500 11/08/19 2:21 pm
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Never underestimate the human ability to elevate stupid to a whole new level!.
Re: Those new RE twins!
Andy Higham #789680 11/10/19 10:07 am
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Originally Posted by Andy Higham
Weight distribution can affect the way a bike feels.
A bike that carries its weight low down will feel lighter but will have sluggish handling and be reluctant to turn into a corner. Whereas a bike with a higher centre of gravity may feel heavier at standstill but will be more agile on the road

This also depends on wheel size.

I call it balance, a bike with weight low down feels balanced. If it is slow to turn in then change the wheel sizes. Usually a smaller 17" or 16" wheel will make the bike very lively and flickable. Use the tyre width to adjust.

Nice RE btw

Last edited by tridentt150v; 11/10/19 10:10 am.
Re: Those new RE twins!
tridentt150v #789899 11/12/19 6:15 am
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Originally Posted by tridentt150v
Originally Posted by Andy Higham
Weight distribution can affect the way a bike feels.
A bike that carries its weight low down will feel lighter but will have sluggish handling and be reluctant to turn into a corner. Whereas a bike with a higher centre of gravity may feel heavier at standstill but will be more agile on the road

This also depends on wheel size.

I call it balance, a bike with weight low down feels balanced. If it is slow to turn in then change the wheel sizes. Usually a smaller 17" or 16" wheel will make the bike very lively and flickable. Use the tyre width to adjust.

My K100RS is really the worst of both, the engine weight is low down but it's such a tall bike. It's heavy and feels heavy.
I'd be interested to try a regular K100. The tire sizes on the RS are 18 rear, 17 front. The regular models are just the opposite. Of course the bars are different too.


Stepping on others doesn't make you stand tall.

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Re: Those new RE twins!
tridentt150v #789909 11/12/19 12:02 pm
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Originally Posted by tridentt150v
Originally Posted by Andy Higham
Weight distribution can affect the way a bike feels.
A bike that carries its weight low down will feel lighter but will have sluggish handling and be reluctant to turn into a corner. Whereas a bike with a higher centre of gravity may feel heavier at standstill but will be more agile on the road

This also depends on wheel size.

I call it balance, a bike with weight low down feels balanced. If it is slow to turn in then change the wheel sizes. Usually a smaller 17" or 16" wheel will make the bike very lively and flickable. Use the tyre width to adjust.

Nice RE btw

Absolutley.. A good example is my modified 79 T140D and 96 900 Ducati Monster...Both weigh about the same with fuel, 430 pounds/fuel but of course the Ducati hs a lot more power with less vibration, They are both narrow bikes, the big Ducati fuel tank give an impression of more width from the rider's viewpoint. They have similar wheelbases with the Ducati having much wider smaller diameter tires and steeper steering angle. With the low bar and rear sets on the Triumph they have similar rider positions...The Triumph at lower speeds is more agile and turns with very little effort..But at higher speeds the Ducati comes into it's own with far higher handling limits..


79 T140D, 96 900M Ducati ....On a bike you can out run the demons..
Re: Those new RE twins!
KC in S.B. #790097 11/15/19 1:13 am
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Yeah, a 'modern' example I know of is the Hinkley Thunderbird triples the Thunderbird/Adventurer/Sport. The Thunderbird had an 18", the Adventurer a 19" [I think] and the Sport had a 17" front tyre, all had the same frame and geometry. The Sport was always on the edge - it took a fair bit of getting used to - if you looked away from the road for a bit then back you would notice that your ride line had moved, there was no room for laziness. You had to watch what you where doing, it was hard to relax, even when on straight roads. The way the weight was distributed you almost rode and turned the bike on the front wheel. But in corners it came into its own, it was much quicker, very responsive. It was the best handling of the 3 overall.
The Thunderbird I rode was much easier to ride/cruise, but was slightly heavier in the corners and not as responsive. I didn't ride an Adventurer but would think it would have fitted the cruiser handling mould, slower, clean lines, wide arcs, and much more predictable.

All of them handled OKish, were top heavy and had overall poor balance.

Re: Those new RE twins!
KC in S.B. #790114 11/15/19 7:24 am
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The generic design of motorcycles is inherently flawed, an example being pitching under acceleration / braking. But where's fun if you can't do wheelies, or at least get the front end light? Can any classic Brit bikes do "stoppies" ?

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Re: Those new RE twins!
KC in S.B. #790123 11/15/19 12:05 pm
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Why the HELL would you want to abuse your equipment like this, and risk busting your ass on the STREET in the process?

This lunacy is why insurance rates have risen.

Re: Those new RE twins!
KC in S.B. #790128 11/15/19 1:02 pm
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Aww Dad. Just havin' a little fun.


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Re: Those new RE twins!
KC in S.B. #790138 11/15/19 4:53 pm
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Really? You cannot tell the picture is fake? The front suspension would be compressed up to the fairing from the weight of that hog. There also is a flat on the rear tyre where it would normally contact the ground.
If cannot lift the rear tyre under braking then your brakes/tyres are not up to the job. Sometime someone will pull out in front of you and you will need that much braking power. Or you can bet your life on luck.

Re: Those new RE twins!
Dibnah #790186 11/16/19 12:10 am
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Originally Posted by Dibnah
Can any classic Brit bikes do "stoppies" ?

Nothing like that, but I have brought the rear wheel off the ground in front of a DMV examiner.
Stock '74 T150V, single Lockheed disc, freshly rebuilt master cylinder. The examiner made me repeat the emergency stop maneuver, so I showed her how to stop. laugh


Stepping on others doesn't make you stand tall.

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Re: Those new RE twins!
KC in S.B. #790190 11/16/19 12:50 am
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I prefer to believe riders are not so stupid as to ride that way, but I've been disappointed in some of them before.

Re: Those new RE twins!
KC in S.B. #790417 11/18/19 4:17 am
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Royal Enfield 2020 models . . .



'64 TR6R Plus some Twins from other countries (U.S., Germany, Japan)
Re: Those new RE twins!
KC in S.B. #791042 11/23/19 12:06 pm
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Anyway......

Who’s ridden the new RE Continental? I’m tempted but no dealer within six hours drive.


'51 C11 in a '54 C10L frame. Back on the road...
'70 Triumph Trophy 500. Next on the bench for a refresh!
'72 Triumph Tiger 650. Back on the road...
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