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Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Irish Swede] #779948 07/29/19 12:12 am
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Originally Posted by Irish Swede
OH NO! A headlight and a tail light!
And a swept-back "clubman" exhaust, too?
Life is compromise. I can have a Catalina that looks exactly like a catalog Catalina, or I can make it street legal so I can ride it whenever I want. To do that requires a headlight and taillight. The exhaust in the picture, thought, is a modified one that's only there for the jetting. If you look closely you'll see the exhaust sensor exiting the top of the pipe just in front of the gearbox. Once I have the jetting set, the standard Catalina pipe will go back on (albeit, with the shorty silencer at the end).

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Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #779967 07/29/19 12:23 pm
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I hope you know I was just teasing you.

Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #780010 07/29/19 8:23 pm
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Originally Posted by Irish Swede
I hope you know I was just teasing you.
Well, you are an AMCA judge so have been indoctrinated to throw modified bikes like my Catalina off the field if entered for judging.

I don't necessarily like loud bikes on the street but it's difficult to know where to draw the line between quiet and h.p. Further, it's difficult to distinguish between the two since a loud bike feels like it's more powerful even if it might not be. Anyway, with feelings of the Competition fresh in my mind, yesterday the Catalina felt like it was somewhat sluggish. That might have been a real effect due to the too-rich main jet or the extra restriction in the exhaust pipe, or it might have been a psychological effect because it was quieter than the Competition, but today I removed the extra baffle that was inside the Catalina's pipe, leaving only the shorty silencer to control the decibels. If a predicted monsoon storm doesn't develop until later in the day tomorrow I'll find out how much difference the additional noise makes in the real or perceived h.p.

p.s. I've been feeling smug for the past ~3 years since I took advantage of the fall of the pound after the Brexit vote to order a Pearson crank. I paid for it in early November 2016 when the pound was on the ropes, saving me ~15% over what it would have cost just six months earlier. However, now I'm depressed because I failed to anticipate the country's ability to make Gold Star crankshafts even less expensive. The pound is now headed for a predicted ~5% greater savings by this coming November.

Attached Files
Baffle.jpg (39.19 KB, 341 downloads)
PoundDollar.jpg (47.71 KB, 337 downloads)
Last edited by Magnetoman; 07/29/19 8:56 pm. Reason: p.s.
Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #780047 07/30/19 1:59 am
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I'm crying for your exchange rate woes, MMan. According to your graph, I paid top dollar for my Pearson crank. And, like yours, it still sits on my bench, awaiting installation..

Question is; Is my crank appreciating in value enough to offset the fluctuations in the exchange rate? For another thread.

Last edited by NYBSAGUY; 07/30/19 12:06 pm.

1949 BSA ZB34 'Bitsa'
1959 BSA DBD34 Catalina
1973 Norton Commando 850 R
1974 Norton Commando 850 R (I know, one too many)
1975 Honda TL250 Trials, a new addition to the family
1998 Montesa HRC Trials
2004 Ducati M1000ie
Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #780074 07/30/19 11:54 am
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Magnetoman, remember when you lived in Illinois and the cops were always on the hunt for bikes with loud pipes?

Now, almost all the Harleys run around here with straight pipes, loud as hell, and the cops do NOTHING!
The funny part is they spend big dollars for the so-called "Screaming Eagle" set-ups, but a guy with a stock Gold Wing can outrun them.

I think the pipes go with the denim vests, ass-less chaps, finger-less "nose-picker" gloves and no helmets which, together, are intended to make the statement: "LOOK AT ME!"

Bozo the Clown wanted everyone to look at HIM, too.

Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Irish Swede] #780081 07/30/19 4:01 pm
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Originally Posted by Irish Swede
...ass-less chaps..


Aren't chaps by definition ass-less?


1970 T120R
Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Irish Swede] #780084 07/30/19 4:24 pm
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Originally Posted by Irish Swede
Magnetoman, remember when you lived in Illinois and the cops were always on the hunt for bikes with loud pipes?
Now, almost all the Harleys run around here with straight pipes, loud as hell, and the cops do NOTHING!
Back then, the motorcyclists being stopped were young and powerless. Now, 40+ years later, the $20k-$30k Harleys are ridden by old white guys who pay taxes, vote, and live next door to city council members.

The son of a late friend is Assoc. Police Chief in town. At a party he told me that one night a few years ago, as a joke on the night watch commander, some of the guys on patrol radioed in that they were on their way to break up a loud party in a rich neighborhood and show those people they couldn't get away with such behavior. As expected, the night watch commander freaked out because he knew how much trouble the people in that neighborhood would cause for him starting the next morning. For the same reason, loud pipes became OK once the odds were no longer small that a motorcyclist being stopped would be a dentist, accountant, lawyer, etc.

Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #780085 07/30/19 4:35 pm
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i don't want to start picking on harley people, because they're motorcyclists first, after all . . . but a buddy of mine at work just bought a dresser that weighs nine hundred and eighty-one pounds. it has a dashboard like a cadillac, and speakers on either side of the pillion that vibrate his wife's ass on either side when he turns up the volume.

it was delivered to his house, and they put the front wheel downhill against his garage door and went away. he tried to pull it backwards to turn it around, and it tipped over. he is no small person, but the bike had to sit there in his driveway on its side until his wife came home and they got a friend to help. it took three people to put it back on the wheels.

to me, that's some sort of very different flavor of motorcycling. i love the harley motor, and have a 1203cc sportster in a tube-framed buell.

but the harley davidson culture is incomprehensible to me.


every day you do not take a chance is a day of your life that you will never get back.
Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: kevin roberts] #780092 07/30/19 6:20 pm
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Originally Posted by kevin roberts
i don't want to start picking on harley people,
Has anyone else noticed that more than 10% of Harley riders now wave or nod in acknowledgment, up from 0.00% a few years ago?

Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #780132 07/31/19 8:19 am
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Loud pipes will vanish the first time some one fires a bike up & deafens the child of a lawer.
Surprised it has not happened in the country where the widdow of the idiot who bought a new pair of running shoes can sue to shop who sold them to him cause they did not make him run aany faster and he got flatteded crossing the freeway.
Over here the EPA polices loud exhausts and they are quite happy to issue compliance notices to HD riders, seen it happen dozens of times when I was on the road all day.
The thing that really urks me though is just how many very loud pipe riders pull ear plugs out of their ears when they take the skid lids off.

But I can not slag too many HD riders cause on most BSA rides the largest contingent are on HD's, which is one reason I am rarely there.


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Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #780134 07/31/19 8:54 am
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OTOH,
HD is the only bike brand that markets to the non-motorcyclist down here and they spend big.
Every week there is a new HD shop opening selling all sorts of over priced do-dads and some even sell motorcycles.
HD toped the road registered bike sales for the last 3 years and looks like doing it again this year.
As committed BSA riders we all know what happens when a motorcycle company stops marketing to new riders.
HD sell a street rod and a road warrior aimed purely at the non motorcycling youth with all the regalia that goes with the "mystique of the marque" .
To boot they offer free dealer service so the kids come in a couple of times a year and thus sit in the showroom so they can buy their HD undies , nose pickers, cup, mugs, knives, T-shirts , sloppy joes, note pads , I-phone covers, jackets , wallets etc etc etc etc.
Thus when they get off their provisional liscences they are already indoctrinated , or rather hooked like a junkie on meths so it will be back to the HD dealer to buy a big bike on HD finance .


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Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: BSA_WM20] #780186 07/31/19 4:57 pm
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Originally Posted by BSA_WM20
OTOH,
HD is the only bike brand that markets to the non-motorcyclist down here and they spend big./
Thus when they get off their provisional liscences they are already indoctrinated , or rather hooked like a junkie on meths so it will be back to the HD dealer to buy a big bike on HD finance .


Luckily we have not such disbalance in Europe ;-) and there is a big rather young audience interested in ‘80,s classics over here.. converting them to 3th gen. Caferacers.... let’s hope they get interested in the future in really and proper classics like our old Brit bikes..

But we are getting really off-topic


Harold
BSA: M20 ‘40 M21,B31 ‘55 B33 ‘54, ZB34GS ‘49
Triumph 5T ‘49 + T100 speedkit
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BMW R51/3 ‘ 51, R100GS ‘89
Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #780187 07/31/19 4:59 pm
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Summer monsoon rain is keeping me from making jetting runs and reporting on the results, so meanwhile I've attached a photo from the 1962 catalog to get this thread back on topic.

Attached Files
Catalina_1962catalog.jpg (110.83 KB, 257 downloads)
Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #780195 07/31/19 6:11 pm
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That image from the BSA catalogue is as lovely as your real-life Catalina. Except, perhaps, for the exhaust.

And with either 'silencer', it will be as loud as any Harley.


1949 BSA ZB34 'Bitsa'
1959 BSA DBD34 Catalina
1973 Norton Commando 850 R
1974 Norton Commando 850 R (I know, one too many)
1975 Honda TL250 Trials, a new addition to the family
1998 Montesa HRC Trials
2004 Ducati M1000ie
Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: NYBSAGUY] #780199 07/31/19 6:30 pm
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Magnetoman Offline OP
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Originally Posted by NYBSAGUY
with either 'silencer', it will be as loud as any Harley.
The same component was used on the 'Competition' model. I have one on the shelf and it doesn't pretend to be anything other than a sound-amplifying megaphone. If for no other reason than the sake of my neighbors I haven't even been tempted to install it on either the Competition or the Catalina.

p.s. Through 1960 Catalinas had a long, straight pipe, but starting in 1961 they came with a shorter pipe and megaphone. The West Coast versions came with a magdyno and regulator to make it easy to turn into a street scrambler, presumably with most people keeping the same exhaust system.

Attached Files
Competition_megaphone.jpg (75.72 KB, 247 downloads)
Catalina_1960catalog.jpg (115.16 KB, 243 downloads)
Catalina_1961catalog.jpg (121.78 KB, 241 downloads)
Last edited by Magnetoman; 07/31/19 6:45 pm. Reason: p.s.
Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #780383 08/02/19 10:09 pm
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I took the rejetted Catalina out for a run today before it got too hot (it was only 97 oF at the time). There's nothing like a properly-geared, correctly jetted Gold Star that's firing on all cylinders. Removing the internal silencer did reduce the silencing, but I think (hope) it's not too loud. I don't think it's my imagination that removing it improved the throttle response.

Although a different silencer likely would require a different main jet, for the record my carburetion is:

1-5/32" AMAL Monobloc
Oiled UNI BF-5 red coarse foam filter material
Pilot jet: #25, 5/8 turn out from closed
Needle jet: .106 (measured 0.1065"-0.1066")
Needle: 2nd notch from top
Cutaway: 4
Main jet: 200

The #4 cutaway may be a tiny bit too much, but any additional fine tuning probably will wait until temperatures drop in the fall, coupled with increased air density.

The 100 octane fuel in the can was just about used up so I filled it with 91 octane from the station, meaning the fuel I used today was less than 92. I thought the knock sensor wasn't working because I didn't see it flash on the 2 miles out of the neighborhood. But, when I did an acceleration run I thought I might be hearing pinging, and when I looked down the knock light was flashing. Retarding the spark at that point turned off the light (and reduced the acceleration). So, even 8:1 has issues with the highest octane available at the pump. At least, there are issues when doing an uphill acceleration run starting at the low end of 4th gear speeds. By the way, if I hadn't had the knock sensor to consult, the faint sound of the pinging over the noise from the engine and wind might not have entered my consciousness

Someone who has been riding motorcycles longer than I have might disagree, but the higher overall "Clubman" gearing I now have in it coupled with the very low 1st of the ASCT gearbox makes a fantastic combination.

I thought the low bars and rearsets of my Competition made it my favorite bike. But now I think the high bars and forward footrests of the Catalina might make it my favorite bike. My BB was my favorite, but I'll have to take it out to see if it still holds that position against its more uncivilized siblings.

Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #781302 08/12/19 7:19 pm
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The first photograph shows work in progress.

[Linked Image]

It's actually nearly done, but I'm waiting for another LED to arrive before drilling the final holes. Shortly after the LED arrives this will become the upgraded Mark II "universal" instrumentation package that I've designed to clamp to just about any set of handlebars. What the photograph doesn't show is brazed underneath is an array of seven nuts to allow the clamp, shown in the second photograph, to connect to the platform as close as possible to the center of gravity irrespective of the location and orientation of the clamp on the handlebars (e.g. clip-ons are nearly horizontal, the unobstructed segments of ape hangers are nearly vertical, and typical handlebars are somewhere between these extremes).

[Linked Image]

The Manfrotto "Super Clamp," repurposed from its camera holding tasks, is perfect for this. It has a rated capacity of 33 lbs. but only will be holding less than 3 lbs. including the Manfrotto universal joint. Together they can position the platform in the best location on just about any bike, as well as hold it so it doesn't vibrate any more than the handlebars themselves do.

Mounted on the platform will be an Innovate MTX-L air/fuel gauge along with a data logger that will record data from that meter as well as from a "universal" throttle position sensor (that also clamps to handlebars), tachometer, accelerometer, exhaust gas temperature (EGT) sensor, and knock sensor. As mentioned previously, engines "feel" like they're running well with Air/Fuel Ratios anywhere between ~10:1 and ~15:1 so accurately adjusting the several circuits and jets in a carburetor for either max. h.p. or max. fuel economy requires just such instrumentation.

The compulsion to upgrade my Mark I instrumentation came over me a few weeks ago so I left the modified pipe on the Catalina in the meantime for the first test of it. Also part of the Mark II upgrade is a quick connect for the power at the platform and a 5A fuse at the battery, all the better to make the installation faster and reduce the chance of the battery exploding.

Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #781312 08/12/19 9:11 pm
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Very interesting MM, it would be great if you could make a sticky post on all the instrumentation you have added, interpretation of the readings and recommendations on how this could be achieved on other bikes.

I'm sure there are plenty of owners out there including me who would love to try something similar on their bikes and get them running as best as possible.


1968 A65 Firebird
1967 B44 Shooting Star
1972 Norton Commando
Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #781323 08/12/19 11:30 pm
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Originally Posted by gunner
if you could make a sticky post on all the instrumentation you have added, interpretation of the readings and recommendations on how this could be achieved on other bikes.
Doing just such a thing is on my agenda once I settle on a "final" instrumentation package (although, with me, nothing like this ever seems to be truly final...), however it will be up to a forum moderator to decide whether or not to make it a sticky.

For someone who doesn't want to permanently install a wide-band sensor in their vehicle Innovate sells an "exhaust clamp" (sampling attachment) that inserts in the end of the exhaust pipe to sample the mixture. The next photograph shows the sampling attachment that I bought with my original meter.

[Linked Image]

The design is like a Pitot tube, with the exhaust flow past the holes in the side of the shorter tube reducing the pressure, drawing the mixture in the end of the longer tube, past the sensor, then back up the shorter tube and out the holes after a long round trip. However, this sampling attachment comes with the warning that it probably won't work on a single-cylinder engine (or a twin with separate pipes) because air is sucked back up the exhaust pipe some significant distance on each cycle. Unless the tip of the sampling unit is further up the pipe than that point, it will give bogus readings. Which it does with the stock sampling unit on my motorcycles. Although I overcame this problem with a "Bunsen valve" arrangement I discussed quite a while ago (possibly in a different thread), it wouldn't be an ideal solution for many people.

[Linked Image]

So, how far does air get drawn back up the pipe? Despite the relatively short pipe currently on my Catalina I know from the behavior of the meter that the location of the sensor doesn't suffer from the air reversion problem. It happens that the Catalina's "silencer" doesn't have anything in the center of it so it's a straight shot all the way to the bend in the header, just past the "permanent" sensor. Since the sampling unit is pretty much useless as-is, I extended it by 10" so it now reaches to the location seen in the photograph. This will let me answer the question at the beginning of this paragraph.

[Linked Image]

As a result of my instrumentation upgrading process I now have a second Bosch sensor and a separate control unit for it. Which means I can have my upgraded Mark II instrumentation package in place, but also use the elongated sampling unit to determine the depth into the pipe where reversion no longer is a problem. With a helper, AKA long-suffering wife, I can check this from idle up to at least a few thousand rpm while the bike is sitting in the driveway. Note that I'm not suggesting determining the jetting this way, since it wouldn't be under load, only determining the depth of the reversion.

This elongated sampling unit has two separate functions: as a test probe to determine the depth of reversion, and to determine the AFR on the road without having to modify the exhaust pipe or use a Bunsen valve. However, the latter relies on the design of the silencer so it won't work on all bikes. For example, it fits up the pipes of a Matchless G80 and Triumph 500, but not a Trident. Still, for bikes where it will work it is an alternative to either a Bunsen valve or permanent modification of an exhaust pipe.


Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #781360 08/13/19 10:08 am
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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
The first photograph shows work in progress.

[Linked Image]

It's actually nearly done, but I'm waiting for another LED to arrive before drilling the final holes. Shortly after the LED arrives this will become the upgraded Mark II "universal" instrumentation package that I've designed to clamp to just about any set of handlebars. What the photograph doesn't show is brazed underneath is an array of seven nuts to allow the clamp, shown in the second photograph, to connect to the platform as close as possible to the center of gravity irrespective of the location and orientation of the clamp on the handlebars (e.g. clip-ons are nearly horizontal, the unobstructed segments of ape hangers are nearly vertical, and typical handlebars are somewhere between these extremes).

[Linked Image]

The Manfrotto "Super Clamp," repurposed from its camera holding tasks, is perfect for this. It has a rated capacity of 33 lbs. but only will be holding less than 3 lbs. including the Manfrotto universal joint. Together they can position the platform in the best location on just about any bike, as well as hold it so it doesn't vibrate any more than the handlebars themselves do.

Mounted on the platform will be an Innovate MTX-L air/fuel gauge along with a data logger that will record data from that meter as well as from a "universal" throttle position sensor (that also clamps to handlebars), tachometer, accelerometer, exhaust gas temperature (EGT) sensor, and knock sensor. As mentioned previously, engines "feel" like they're running well with Air/Fuel Ratios anywhere between ~10:1 and ~15:1 so accurately adjusting the several circuits and jets in a carburetor for either max. h.p. or max. fuel economy requires just such instrumentation.

The compulsion to upgrade my Mark I instrumentation came over me a few weeks ago so I left the modified pipe on the Catalina in the meantime for the first test of it. Also part of the Mark II upgrade is a quick connect for the power at the platform and a 5A fuse at the battery, all the better to make the installation faster and reduce the chance of the battery exploding.



Yes, but the Manfrotto camera stand is for a stationary camera , not one mounted on a motorcycle getting buffetted by wind.
The scrim clamps are a lot stronger
And of course the ground rarely vibrates ( well not down here any way ) so the clamps might not be be too happy when that cam starts to sing.
The photographers who did not have a budget for camera rails used to clamp their gear onto wheel chairs and I have been called in to get some new clamps on more than one shoot.


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Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: BSA_WM20] #781385 08/13/19 4:08 pm
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Originally Posted by BSA_WM20
the clamps might not be be too happy when that cam starts to sing.
Of my various worries, the strength of the Manfrotto clamp for this task isn't one of them. However, I have a bigger problem at the moment. The garage A/C stopped working yesterday afternoon and record-breaking temperatures are predicted through Friday. Progress is at a stop until the A/C is functioning again.

Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #781426 08/14/19 2:03 am
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As an aside for people interested in magneto capacitors that fail, it was the capacitor in my four-year old A/C unit that had failed. The repairman told me they service units made in the 1950s that still have their original capacitors, but when the mandated change was made to environmentally friendly materials the lifetimes dropped to anywhere from 1 to 10 years. He said that replacing failed A/C capacitors is the largest category of their work. Although he got it fixed quickly, the day already had a 100 oF head start so it took much of the afternoon to get it down to a bearable temperature. Hence, not much progress was made today.

Discussion on another site made me realize that in the context of exhausts the word "reversion" refers to two separate, but interrelated, phenomena. One is the pressure wave that reaches the end of the pipe and then bounces back just in time, and with the right positive or negative amplitude, to either keep all the exhaust from escaping from the cylinder, or to help suck additional charge into the cylinder. Either way, performance can either suffer or benefit in the rpm range where such "pressure reversion" takes place. Here, essentially no physical transport of air/CO2 within the pipe has to take place. The reason is, pressure applied at one end of a long tube that's sealed at the other end also raises the pressure at the sealed end without transporting any of the additional gas molecules that were applied at the open end to raise the pressure.

For AFR measurements, the issue is the actual transport of O2 molecules from the open end of the pipe up some distance into the pipe (albeit, not nearly as far up the pipe as to reach the cylinder). In "reversion" of this type there is physical transport of O2 molecules, and if any of them make it as far as the AFR sensor they will screw up the measurement.

---- sidebar ---
The stock, open exhaust pipe on my Catalina's is 1.65"ID and 51" long, for a total volume of 1.79 liters. This would be enough to fill the cylinder more than three times over if all of it "reverted." The modified pipe and silencer I have on it now for AFR testing has the sensor 18" from the end, so if a volume of 647cc were uniformly drawn back into the cylinder then fresh air would reach the sensor. Which it doesn't. Interestingly, the sampling tip of my unmodified Innovate was 9.67" long, for a volume between it and the exit of the exhaust pipe of 339cc. There were reversion issues with it. However, that's not to say that at least 339cc is sucked back into the cylinder on each cycle. But it does say that that enough air is sucked far enough back that it, along with mixing, results in at least some fresh air reaching ~9.7" into the pipe.

For understanding this it is important to keep in mind that an AFR meter doesn't actually measure the AFR. It measures the amount of free O2 (or deficit of free O2) from which the controller then calculates the AFR. If the sensor detects no O2 whatever the controller displays that null result as '14.7'. Because the controller displays results calculated from deviations from 'zero' it takes only a tiny amount of wayward free O2 to generate a large bogus result.
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A question asked on another site was how much effect an sampling probe causes. Afer testing the new Mark II instrumentation system I'll shove a probe up the exhaust and see what effect the disruption causes. The answer could turn out to be "a lot," given what the attached photographs show.

The first photograph is a side view of the sampling probe in a 1-3/4" OD pipe, and the second is an end-on view.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

The paired 3/8"-OD sampling tubes block a little over 10% of the exhaust pipe over a considerable length. Further, the fumes that manage to squeeze past that obstacle then encounter the fat sensor mount at the end of the tube, further hindering their escape. As the third photograph indicates, I can at least make the life of the exhaust fumes a little easier if I attach a new mounting point to the probe a few inches upstream from the current mounting point, which is what I'll do.

[Linked Image]

Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #781471 08/14/19 8:23 pm
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Magnetoman Offline OP
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The following video is relevant for this thread

https://youtu.be/KjKUKhHQLHg

It nicely illustrates the fact that although you need the right data to arrive at a correct conclusion, having that data is useless if you don't know what it means. At 5'46" into the video the narrator says "Tuning a carburetor to fix an exhaust problem is somewhat like putting your arm in a sling to cure a headache." He is completely wrong, and because of this his conclusions are wrong.

Because of "reversion" with the straight pipes on the engine in the video there is a dip in mid-range h.p. accompanied by a too-rich mixture. If the narrator had understood the AFR data he would have realized the problem was with the carburetor, not with reversion due to resonance in the exhaust pipe. To replace his incorrect medical analogy with a relevant one, this video is like trying to cure a fever with aspirin when the actual problem is strep throat.

At one point in the video they installed a larger air bleed jet that the narrator said would increase the AFR in the midrange, but the subsequent AFR curves showed it had essentially no effect. At another point they installed a smaller main jet which resulted in an increase in AFR at high rpm. But, the problem is at lower rpm.

With an AMAL (or Mikuni) there are enough adjustments to deal with mixture issues wherever they occur. However, rather than take advantage of the reversion by re-jetting the appropriate circuit in their carburetor that dominates the mixture in that rpm range, the narrator blamed the mid-range problem on the exhaust pipe and tried to kill the reversion rather than adjust the carburetor. Of course, this assumes the design of their S&S carburetor actually allows such an adjustment.

For our purposes any possible limitations due to the design of S&S carburetors aren't important, only whether or not an obstruction in the exhaust pipe interferes with the dynamics of the engine in such a way to affect the AFR when measured with an external probe. I hope to have the answer to that before much longer, although the current ten-day forecast is for temperatures 102-106 oF that entire period.

Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #781549 08/15/19 4:00 pm
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Magnetoman Offline OP
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A Swag Off Road Portaband band saw stand is one of my most-used tools (e.g. I used it to cut the metal for this current project) so two or three years ago I bought one of their finger brakes because I thought it could be useful on some future project. It's heavy enough that I lifted its three component parts separately onto the press to avoid destroying my back, which indicates it should be rugged enough for any possible motorcycle-related task. Sure, I could have put the 0.040" stainless switch panel in the vise and bent it that way, but what's the point in having a finger brake and 30-ton press if you don't use them?

[Linked Image]

All the holes are drilled and tapped so, since I hope this Mark II platform ends up being Mark Final, it merited a coat of paint. Etching primer followed by a few hours baking in the 107 oF sun yesterday should provide a solid base for gloss black today, followed by a few hours baking in the predicted 109 oF sun.

[Linked Image]

Re: 1962 Catalina [Re: Magnetoman] #781684 08/16/19 11:50 pm
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Magnetoman Offline OP
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There have been two positive developments on my projects since yesterday. Two weeks ago I mentioned in my engine simulation thread that Windows had done an automatic update and as a result I could no longer print from my office computer. The update had installed something like three of four packages but the final one failed to install, no on-line information dealt with this problem, and nothing I tried to solve it worked. However, yesterday it did another update and what Microsoft tooketh away, Microsoft gaveth back. The computer again recognizes the existence of my printer.

The other development is I completed my Mark II instrumentation package. The Bosch AFR sensor should be turned on only after the engine is running so I positioned the on/off switch and used a large button to activate recording, all the better to operate both with a gloved finger. The LED next to the button flashes when it's recording and the LED below it flashes when triggered by the knock sensor. Not that it will matter very much, if at all, in practice, but since the LED that came with the knock controller is red I used a different color LED (orange) to indicate recording.

[Linked Image]

The Innovate AFR gauge flashes the instantaneous reading in the middle of the gauge at ~10 Hz as well as in an "analog" ring of LEDs around the outer edge. Since an "analog" meter is much more useful than digital for quickly mentally processing what is going on, and since the LEDs in the outer ring are brightest when viewed head on so, and since I can't tilt the platform (because then I couldn't use the internal accelerometers), I tilted the gauge in its mount.

As I wrote earlier, on the bottom of the platform is an array of seven nuts for attaching it to the Manfrotto clamp. I gave the platform multiple attachment points for maximum flexibility in mounting on various motorcycles. It's now mounted on the Catalina ready to go but a heat wave as well as other obligations likely means it will be a few weeks before I'll be able to test it on the road.

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