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Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741074
07/07/18 7:47 pm
07/07/18 7:47 pm
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 466
Dallas Texas
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"The first photograph shows the new angle of the rear stand after I fixed it, and the third photograph shows the bike on the "universal" side stand I added. I really like the sidestand, but today's test shows that, since it's mounted on an angled frame tube, I will need to grind the lug to let it go just a little further over center for stability."

Good deal on first ride! We made stand stands also. So much nicer when stopping for a short bit.

My bike is running well but has a slight weave from the front starting at 55mph. Happy at 47, 48 mph. Staying late today working on trailer. It is in the non air conditioned building, bummer.

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Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: RPM] #741077
07/07/18 8:38 pm
07/07/18 8:38 pm
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Magnetoman Online content OP

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Originally Posted by kommando
Any chance of mounting a camera to look at the sight glass for reviewing at your leisure later on.
I need real time control of the oil drip since, presumably, the drip rate I set at idle increases when the rpm goes up. So, multiple adjustments would be needed during the day as riding conditions change. A camera only would be useful for an autopsy: "Ah, I see that no oil was flowing, which explains why the engine siezed." I'm thinking of trying a piece of screen inside the site glass to temporarily delay each drop long enough for me to see it.

Originally Posted by RPM
We made stand stands also. So much nicer when stopping for a short bit.
Exactly. Instead of a balancing act and weight lifting competition at each short stop you just have to flick the side stand down. I finished grinding and repainting the lug and will reattach it shortly, assuming that sitting in direct sunlight at 102 dries paint relatively fast. The two things remaining on my list from today's run are to mount a new fire extinguisher more securely (luckily, they came in packs of three so I still have two left), but still have it easily accessible, and mount the tool bag so the straps don't slip off the top.

Originally Posted by RPM
working on trailer. It is in the non air conditioned building, bummer.
I leave my garage A/C at 88 in the summer since excess heat can damage some things and only cool it from there on days I'll be working. Since I was taking bikes in and out this morning I didn't lower the thermostat until after I returned from the ride and by then it was already almost 100 outside. It only had managed to drag it down to 84 by the time I took a break for lunch, which is a few degrees hotter than is comfortable (obviously, I'm stalling by writing this post to give it time to go lower). Working with A/C would be a killer.

Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741103
07/08/18 1:03 am
07/08/18 1:03 am
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 328
Irene, South Africa
robcurrie Offline
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You might want to make a dedicated bracket for your extinguisher because the rules call for a 2.5 pound dry chemical unit.

Rob C

edit: Sorry, they "recommend" it.

Last edited by robcurrie; 07/08/18 1:07 am. Reason: added note
Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741177
07/08/18 4:17 pm
07/08/18 4:17 pm
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Magnetoman Online content OP

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Originally Posted by robcurrie
You might want to make a dedicated bracket for your extinguisher
As yesterday's ride illustrates, a rigid-frame bike is pretty bouncy. So, the problem is having a bracket that attaches the fire extinguisher securely enough that there's no danger of it bouncing off, but still allows it to be released almost instantly if it's needed.

Yesterday I took a trip to the hardware store and bought a short piece of PVC pipe and end cap whose ID is only a few mm larger than the OD of the extinguisher. There are a couple of places where I could attach it either horizontally or nearly vertically. But, I wasn't entirely happy with it, and still would need to devise a way to hold the extinguisher in the tube while allowing quick release. Then I found a fabric-and-Velco holder marketed for jeeps that looks like it could be the solution. The only criticism of it is that it allows the extinguisher to flop around when strapped to a roll bar, but that doesn't seem like it will be an issue if strapped to the flat package tray of the Ariel. But, soon I'll see, because one is on order for delivery on Tuesday. Meanwhile, I'll carry the extinguisher in my backpack.

Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741197
07/08/18 7:04 pm
07/08/18 7:04 pm
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Posts: 798
Farnham, Surrey, UK
gunner Online content
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Quote
The main problem revealed today is the bike's "suspension" makes it impossible to see what's happening in the sight glass when underway


No easy answer to this problem but perhaps some kind of mirror arrangement could be rigged up so that you could get a vague confirmation of oil supply without having to look down at the tank. No doubt vibration and road bumps would be an issue however I'm sure your experience with optics would be advantageous in formulating a solution.

Quote
The only criticism of it is that it allows the extinguisher to flop around when strapped to a roll bar


I would simply use some large cable ties to add extra grip when securing against the frame tubes.

Last edited by gunner; 07/08/18 7:09 pm.

1968 A65 Firebird
1967 B44 Shooting Star
1972 Norton Commando
Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741202
07/08/18 7:36 pm
07/08/18 7:36 pm
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 4,359
New Jersey USA
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So--as an aside but still vaguely on thread---------
Today I rode with friends to a central Joooisey diner for breakfast.
This diner is well frequented by bikers on Sundays for its good breakfasts.
There was a guy there who was on a shake down ride on his HD for the 2018 Cannonball Run.
Photos attached.
On a slightly less (more?) important note this diner seves the nearest I have encountered in US to a full English breakfast.
So I had eggs, bacon, sausages, French toast (as a substitute for fatted bread), fired tomotoes and fried mushrooms followed by buttered toast and marmalade.
Pity there were no baked beans, black pudding or braised kidneys but I guess that is what is known as a first world problem.

Attached Files HD Cannonball 2018.jpgHD Cannonball 2018 (2).jpg
Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741232
07/09/18 12:31 am
07/09/18 12:31 am
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Magnetoman Online content OP

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Originally Posted by gunner
get a vague confirmation of oil supply without having to look down at the tank.
My hoped-for solution is a screen I made for the bottom of the sight glass. I used the 3/4" hole in a die to stamp a circle from stainless but it proved to be too coarse to delay the drop by very much so I added a finer Cu screen to the other side. In a test in the garage it seemed to make the drops visible for as much as ~2 sec. But, maybe it was just the carbon monoxide making me hallucinate so I'll have to see if the visibility is still there on a road test.

Note that the solder around the outside of the stainless screen wasn't because I planned to add the Cu at that stage, but to keep strands of wire from coming loose and finding their way into the engine. Given how hard it is to see the light amber drops of oil I have to wonder if 1920's oil was darker than today's.

Originally Posted by gunner
I would simply use some large cable ties to add extra grip when securing against the frame tubes.
I think just having it strapped to the flat package tray will solve the problem. Remember, it has to be both secure as well as quickly accessible.

Originally Posted by Tridentman
eggs, bacon, sausages, French toast ... fatted bread), buttered toast
When Spock offered the Vulcan blessing "Live long and prosper" could it have been subtle advice not to eat an English breakfast?

[Linked Image]

I lost my breakdown driver today because the granddaughters came over this morning to play with the budgies they're raising and training here, and by the time they left it was too hot outside. But, while they were here they agreed to loan me their clubhouse (i.e. the shipping crate the Ariel came in from England) so I won't have to build a new one from scratch. This will save a lot of time. Examining photos from when it arrived let me see that there should be sufficient room in the nooks and crannies to pack the necessary spares and clothes.

Thinking about what might go wrong... OK, let me narrow that down, since a huge number of things might go wrong. Anyway, since I'll be totally dependent on the bicycle odometer for navigation I ordered a spare one. They're only $12. Unfortunately, after ordering it I discovered the odometer in the present one had reset itself to '0' sometime between yesterday and today. If it doesn't retain the mileage reading for at least long enough for a lunch stop I'll have to replace it with one that does.

My initial calibration of the current unit, based on the measured OD of the front tire, was reasonably close but after yesterday's run I changed the settings on my GPS unit to update every 6 sec. in order to do an accurate calibration.

My GPS determines the distance traveled by adding straight line segments between updates so on twisty roads the more frequent the updates the more accurate the distance, although at the expense of filling the internal memory faster. If I record the mileage on the bicycle speedometer and GPS unit when the latter is near 9.99 miles and use that to recalibrate the speedometer the resulting 0.1% accuracy will correspond to an error of 0.3 miles at the end of a 300-mile day. There's no reason to expect the mileages on our route sheets will be any more accurate than that, anyway.

Attached Files SightGlassScreen01.jpgSightGlassScreen02.jpgSightGlassScreen03.jpg
Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741241
07/09/18 2:07 am
07/09/18 2:07 am
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 8
Melbourne, Australia
V
Villiers Offline
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Melbourne, Australia
You're overthinking this oiling the engine stuff. Last month I celebrated a 50 year partnership with a 1926 Matchless. Total loss lubrication of course. The original oil pump fitted was a Best & Lloyd with an oil indicator only. If the indicator button was out, oil was getting in, with no indication of how much. The general indication was that if gave a puff of smoke when you blipped the throttle you were okay. Over oiling was indicated by the street disappearing in a blue haze at traffic lights. Plus a sticky exhaust valve if you persisted with over oiling. That was fine for years but slowly the old pump fell apart and became more pink Plastibond than original metal so I upgraded to a Pilgrim pump as used on later Matchless. As you know this has no indicator but a sight glass. I immediately started obsessing about how much oil was being pumped, how many drops per minute, was it still working and so on. I also worried because I couldn't see the pump bowl clearly as it was down on the timing chest and also my knee was in the way, vibration blurred everything. Worry, worry, worry.

You get the picture. The new sight bowl created my problems, it was no help at all. Once I was confident the Pilgrim was actually pumping I went back to my original riding habits and everything was just as fine as before. You'll find the same. The sight bowl is useless when you're on the move. Count the drops when it's sitting still by all means but it's how it performs on the road that matters.

Get out and ride the bloody thing. You need a minimum of a thousand mile up before the start and long rides in stinking hot sun so everything gets heat soaked will show up what needs to be shown up.

Break a leg, I'm green with envy.

Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741250
07/09/18 4:47 am
07/09/18 4:47 am
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Originally Posted by Villiers
You're overthinking this oiling the engine stuff.
I'm afraid offering this advice to me is like advising my dogs they shouldn't bark. These behaviors are in our DNA.

The drip rate at idle definitely picks up as I rev the engine so I expect it's pretty much linear in rpm. Unfortunately, that means I can't just set the rate at idle without adjusting it when underway to avoid over-oiling. However, it's reasonable to hope after a few road tests I will have determined a few positions of the knob to mark with paint (e.g. 'idle', 'town', and 'highway') so I won't have to refer to the sight glass from then on.

Originally Posted by Villiers
Break a leg, I'm green with envy.
Thanks very much. An email from the organizers arrived tonight with some information, including the fact the calendar is now at 60 days before D-day.

Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741270
07/09/18 10:16 am
07/09/18 10:16 am
Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 798
Farnham, Surrey, UK
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Quote
Given how hard it is to see the light amber drops of oil I have to wonder if 1920's oil was darker than today's.


I would guess that the new amber oil will soon turn black after a few hundred miles so maybe easier to see.

It is possible to build an electronic drip detector. This device uses the interruption of a light beam by a drip to signal that a drip has passed, see This Link. Plans are available and you would need to build a circuit as well as program it so might be a challenge. As designed this device beeps when a drip falls, maybe you need a light to come on instead.

Last edited by gunner; 07/09/18 11:37 am.

1968 A65 Firebird
1967 B44 Shooting Star
1972 Norton Commando
Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741277
07/09/18 1:06 pm
07/09/18 1:06 pm
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Scotland
kommando Online content
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As the system is total loss on the oil it will never go dark unless a dye is added, with 300 mile days the flow does need to be monitored so as to make sure the day is ended with oil left to spare.

Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741294
07/09/18 3:48 pm
07/09/18 3:48 pm
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Magnetoman Online content OP

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Originally Posted by gunner
It is possible to build an electronic drip detector.
Electronic detectors like that have a history in high school physics labs going back more than a half-century, in an experiment to measure the acceleration of gravity (9.8 m/sec2). A ball is dropped with the sensor at various measured distances and the times when the beam is broken are used for the calculation. Analogous to the mechanism in a Chronometric, circuitry could add the number of drops in, say, 30 sec. and display that flow rate. The optimum integration time would be short enough to alert the rider to an issue before damage was caused, but long enough that fluctuations in the reading wouldn't be bothersome. Not that I'm planning to do anything more than monitor the drops the old-fashioned way.

Originally Posted by kommando
the flow does need to be monitored...
Agreed. Issues with flow that immediately come to mind are that it determines whether the engine seizes due to under-oiling, the exhaust guide seizes due to over-oiling, the spark plug shorts due to over-oiling, the top end needs de-coking every day, and the oil tank is emptied before the end of the day. For at least these five important reasons, I am concerned with monitoring, and adjusting, the drips.

Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741317
07/09/18 8:30 pm
07/09/18 8:30 pm
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Magnetoman Online content OP

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Despite my inconsiderate wife forcing me to plan my rides around her schedule, I managed an 8.3 mile run today including several miles on a major street. I made it to ~45 mph, limited by traffic, not by the Ariel. It turns out the Ariel is a rocket. Who knew a bike that old could be hiding so many h.p. behind its civilized facade? The bike doesn't just feel fast because of its rigid frame, girder forks and low seating position, the speedometer confirms it is fast. The attached soft-focus photograph (thanks to a greasy thumbprint on the lens) shows the bike after the run. I've learned to park it on gravel to minimize oil dripped on the driveway.

It feels like I could ride all day at 30 mph in 1st, with ~32-33 starting to get a little buzzy, so that's equivalent to loping along at 60 mph in 3rd, with 70+ mph easily reachable if needed. Again, instructions from the Cannonball sent when my entry was accepted say "Motorcycles will need to maintain at least 43-50 mph[*] on straight flat roads. It is estimated that less than 100 miles will be run on interstate highways, and less than 10 of those miles on urban interstates." Since 40 is on the verge of lugging it in 3rd, with the gearing I have on it now the Ariel more than meets the speed requirements without thrashing it, and it shouldn't have too much of a speed differential with modern vehicles on interstates.

Although a larger screen will be better, the one in the oil cup now made the drops visible on all but the bouncy roads so my scheme of having a few paint marks on the knob, with only an occasional look to put my mind at ease, looks like it will work.

Unfortunately, the bicycle speedometer I have is no good. It automatically resets itself to the default mode and zeros the odometer when it comes to a stop for even a few seconds. I need to find one that doesn't have this "feature" (which I wouldn't think a bicycle rider would like, either).

A few other notes from today are to find where oil on the exhaust pipe below the timing chest (and several fittings) came from, and to increase the idle speed a little.

Having a hoard of AMAL parts I'll never need is very useful when I need them. In the bike now is a 300 main jet so I selected four jets smaller than that, and three larger (I don't have any 330s) to have along. Also, I measured a number of needle jets and selected two spares that have the necessary 0.1065" ID.

The bike is back up on the lift. I bought this second lift (the first is a "classic" red one from Harbor Freight) with an air-over-hydraulic jack when I was wiring my friend's ZB34/M20 bitza and every time I simply press the lever on the air hose for 10 sec., instead of pumping on a pedal 100 times, I'm grateful I have it. There won't be any test rides for the next two days, because of my wife's schedule, but I have enough things on my to-do list to get ready for the Cannonball that the time won't be wasted.

[*] later instructions now on the Cannonball's web page say motorcycles must be able to maintain 45 mph.


Attached Files IMG_8136.JPG
Last edited by Magnetoman; 07/10/18 5:53 pm. Reason: added [*]
Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741331
07/09/18 10:30 pm
07/09/18 10:30 pm
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Scotland
kommando Online content
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I will post a bicycle Speedo that retains data for a year tomorrow.

Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741344
07/10/18 12:38 am
07/10/18 12:38 am
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Magnetoman Online content OP

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Originally Posted by kommando
I will post a bicycle Speedo that retains data for a year tomorrow.
I would very much appreciate that. I spent at least 15 min. reading descriptions before giving up because I couldn't find any that mentioned whether or not they retained data when off.

Meanwhile, I re-read an old email from the Cannonball organizer saying participants could use Garmin Edge 510 or 520 bicycle GPS units without mapping and I found someone in China listing five new 520 units for very low buy-it-now prices. I ordered one and got confirmation, but a little over an hour later got a notice from eBay saying they've removed the other units from eBay "due to concerns with the seller's account." But, that notice goes on to say I still should get the item I ordered. Fingers crossed that it comes, because I'd like two odometers (belt and braces...). GPS is great; except in tunnels or if the battery goes dead, and a bicycle speedometer is great, except if a wire breaks or the magnet falls off (or the battery goes dead), so I want redundancy.

I tightened the side stand bolts and managed to strip the Grade -10 bolts supplied with it. I replaced the bolts with proper ones, which is what I should have done in the first place, and the stand is now back in place. The stand came from India but the holes are tapped UNF.

I made a larger screen for the sight glass, this time using two pieces of the fine-mesh Cu rotated 45-deg. from each other to maximize the time it takes for each drop to disappear from sight.

I also made 'U' brackets for the number plates and, while the paint dries, I'm trying to decide whether to use them, zip ties, or zip ties plus safety wire. The decision isn't as simple as it sounds since mounting the plates at identical heights on both sides of the forks would be easier with the zip ties, but steel brackets would be stronger against the hurricane-like wind as the Ariel blasts down the road.

Attached Files IMG_8138.JPG
Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741356
07/10/18 2:52 am
07/10/18 2:52 am
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 328
Irene, South Africa
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Don't underestimate the strength of zip ties, I did an emergency repair on an old car of mine whose exhaust hanger rubbers were all perished and broken. I replaced them all with heavy duty ties to get to an exhaust shop and decided they were working so well I there was no urgency to go there - that was a few months ago and I travel about 10 miles on rough dirt roads every day. There are also stainless steel ties available.

Rob C

Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741377
07/10/18 9:46 am
07/10/18 9:46 am
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 9,375
Scotland
kommando Online content
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Sundig SD-563b

https://www.amazon.com/Waterproof-Computer-Odometer-Speedometer-Backlight/dp/B01N41RKSA

I have the screen showing temp and time but you can change that. Has a backlight but never use that as it really used to show true speed as the Vaguelia clocks fitted to the Commando are way out and there are too many speed cameras around.

[Linked Image]

Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: kommando] #741399
07/10/18 2:17 pm
07/10/18 2:17 pm
Joined: Nov 2011
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Magnetoman Online content OP

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Originally Posted by kommando
Sundig SD-563b
Thanks very much. I just ordered one, although Amazon quotes a wide spread of possible delivery dates that could have me installing and calibrating it in Maine.

Originally Posted by robcurrie
Don't underestimate the strength of zip ties,
Typically they're very strong, although enough have snapped when I've tightened them that I don't have 100% confidence in their strength when used in "structural" applications. If I go that route rather than using my bespoke steel brackets I'd position the plates with the zip ties but add a loop of safety wire to seal the deal.

Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741515
07/11/18 3:58 pm
07/11/18 3:58 pm
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Magnetoman Online content OP

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The fire extinguisher "sock" arrived yesterday but isn't the perfect solution I hoped it would be. It has plenty of straps, and the Ariel has plenty of stays, but the straps and stays don't match as well as one might hope. Perhaps a little more time moving it around, or adding a cross-piece to the package tray, may result in a better mounting scheme. Peeking out of the sock in the photograph is a 1 lb. extinguisher, that I suspect would be sufficient. If by the time an extinguisher were deployed a gasoline fire was large enough that 1 lb. couldn't handle it, it probably would be hopeless. That said, a 2.5 lb extinguisher is due for delivery later today.

We have workers at the house through tomorrow so I can't sneak off on another ride until they finish. However, meanwhile I've been working on an organizational scheme for packing the tools, spares and supplies so that I'll know if there are issues with shipping the volume needed, as well as have a chance of remembering that I have them if/when they're needed.

For anyone planning to show up at the start or finish of the Cannonball, the following time-sensitive email from the organizer arrived today and may be of interest:

------------------------------
We have some extra rooms in both Portland, Maine and in Portland Oregon. If you have any friends, family, or acquaintances that would like to stay in the same hotel as us you can send them this link.

If I release these rooms back to the Hotels the price if you try to book will go up by about $100.00 each per night!!!!

We will have the link open and available to people to reserve rooms until midnight Mountain time 7/14/2018 after that the remaining rooms will be released back to the hotels.

http://motorcyclecannonball.com/hotel-signup/

-------------------------------

Attached Files FireExtSock.jpg
Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741524
07/11/18 5:10 pm
07/11/18 5:10 pm
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 4,359
New Jersey USA
Tridentman Online content

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Hi MMan---thanks for the hotel link.
I have just reserved rooms so look forward to meeting you in ME in person.
I shall be driving up from NJ so if there is anything big/heavy you will need at the start that I can bring then please say so.
For example I have a set of roller starters.

Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741535
07/11/18 6:12 pm
07/11/18 6:12 pm
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Originally Posted by Tridentman
look forward to meeting you in ME in person.
And likewise. I'll be landing there late Tues. (assuming I get around to booking a ticket). The schedule in ME is:

Wed.: Registration (noon-4pm)

Thurs: Registration (8am-4pm), tech inspection (8am-4pm) and optional practice run (1-3pm)

Fri.: Re-registration and tech re-inspection (for those who failed one or both on Thurs., 8-9am), rider and support crew briefings (9am-noon), mandatory ride to location for official photograph (1:30-4pm), social hour (6-7pm), and banquet (7-9pm)

Sat.: depart for Keene, NH (7am)

I appreciate your offer of hauling but I hope everything I think I will need fits in the shipping box. Thanks to having to survive multiple times with my BSA beyond the Pale in Ireland I have a pretty comprehensive list of tools, spares and clothes needed to travel by motorcycle in uncivilized parts of the world, like Co. Cork or South Dakota. However, as I begin assembling items for this misadventure the reality of it is finally starting to sink in. How did I ever agree to do this??!!

Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741543
07/11/18 7:23 pm
07/11/18 7:23 pm
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 328
Irene, South Africa
robcurrie Offline
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robcurrie  Offline
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Posts: 328
Irene, South Africa
You could always close the oil tap at the start of day one and save a lot of bum ache.
Only kidding, we all want to see 6 drips a minute every day!

Rob C

Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741598
07/12/18 7:36 am
07/12/18 7:36 am
Joined: Aug 2016
Posts: 40
Canterbury, New Zealand
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BevanC Offline
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Canterbury, New Zealand
Regarding the difficulty in seeing the oil drips - I'm happy to be told this is a really dumb suggestion, but - there are a wide range of highly coloured petroleum dyes available; I'm sure you could find one that would make the oil drips more visible under the conditions you will be riding. Obviously, they are readily oil soluble and intensely coloured, so you'd only need to carry a tiny amount of the stuff to add to your topup oil.
Just a thought...
Cheers,
Bevan

Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741683
07/12/18 11:20 pm
07/12/18 11:20 pm
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 4,488
U.S.
Magnetoman Online content OP

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Magnetoman  Online Content OP

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U.S.
Originally Posted by robcurrie
You could always close the oil tap at the start of day one and save a lot of bum ache.
Shh, I don't want my teammate to know this is my backup plan ("Sorry, my bike broke so I'll have to ride inside the truck today when we cross the Rockies in the freezing sleet.")

Originally Posted by BevanC
there are a wide range of highly coloured petroleum dyes available;
Thanks for the suggestion, which is a good one. I thought about this but decided against trying because a thin coat of oil builds up at the base of the cup that probably would make it hard to distinguish between a new drop that hit a second earlier, and remnants of oil that had been there for the past seven seconds. The screen makes each new drop linger longer so I have time to spot it when only glancing down occasionally (to avoid doing a George Clooney on a stopped car).

Re: 1928 Ariel Model C [Re: Magnetoman] #741732
07/13/18 9:21 am
07/13/18 9:21 am
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 3,743
Sydney Australia
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BSA_WM20 Offline
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Sydney Australia
Quote
The fire extinguisher "sock" arrived yesterday but isn't the perfect solution I hoped it would be. It has plenty of straps, and the Ariel has plenty of stays, but the straps and stays don't match as well as one might hope. Perhaps a little more time moving it around, or adding a cross-piece to the package tray, may result in a better mounting scheme. Peeking out of the sock in the photograph is a 1 lb. extinguisher, that I suspect would be sufficient. If by the time an extinguisher were deployed a gasoline fire was large enough that 1 lb. couldn't handle it, it probably would be hopeless. That said, a 2.5 lb extinguisher is due for delivery later today.


How is the size of the fire extinguisher as comparred to a wine bottle ?
Lots of bottle caddies about that could be mounted on the bike and most have a reasonably good cap that is quickly removable
Use a 2 bottle one for some rider extinguisher as well.


Bike Beesa
Trevor
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